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Laravel vs Node.js: What are the differences?

  1. Scalability and Performance: One key difference between Laravel and Node.js is their approach to scalability and performance. Laravel, a PHP framework, utilizes a traditional server-side architecture, where each request is handled by a separate PHP process. This can lead to performance limitations and increased resource consumption as the number of concurrent users increases. On the other hand, Node.js, a JavaScript runtime, uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model, allowing it to handle a large number of concurrent requests efficiently and providing better scalability.

  2. Language and Ecosystem: Another difference lies in the languages and ecosystems used. Laravel is based on PHP, a popular server-side scripting language with a vast ecosystem of libraries and frameworks. This enables developers to leverage a wide range of tools and resources when building applications. In contrast, Node.js is built on JavaScript, a versatile language widely used for both front-end and back-end development, giving developers the advantage of using the same language across different areas of a project. Additionally, Node.js benefits from a large and active JavaScript community, providing extensive libraries and packages.

  3. Concurrency and Event-Driven Programming: Laravel and Node.js differ in their approach to concurrency and event-driven programming. Laravel follows a synchronous execution approach, where each request blocks the server until completed. This can lead to a slower response time for applications with high traffic. In contrast, Node.js follows an asynchronous, event-driven architecture, allowing it to handle multiple requests concurrently without blocking the server. This asynchronous nature makes Node.js a suitable choice for real-time web applications, streaming services, and other high-performance scenarios.

  4. Ease of Development: When it comes to ease of development, Laravel and Node.js offer different advantages. Laravel provides a comprehensive and intuitive syntax, allowing developers to build applications quickly and easily. It includes features such as a powerful ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) system, routing, caching, authentication, and more, making it an excellent choice for developers familiar with PHP. On the other hand, Node.js's lightweight and flexible nature provide developers with more control and freedom in building applications. With a focus on simplicity and modularity, Node.js allows for rapid prototyping and customization, especially for developers proficient in JavaScript.

  5. Community and Support: Both Laravel and Node.js have vibrant communities and strong support systems. Laravel has a dedicated and active community, with numerous tutorials, documentation, and forums available to help developers. It also has an extensive ecosystem of packages and extensions contributed by the community. Similarly, Node.js benefits from a large and enthusiastic community, with a vast repository of modules and libraries available through the npm (Node Package Manager) registry. This strong community support ensures that developers using either framework can find help, resources, and solutions easily.

  6. Hosting and Deployment: Laravel and Node.js differ in their hosting and deployment options. Laravel applications are commonly deployed on traditional web servers running PHP, such as Apache or Nginx, making it easier to find hosting providers that support PHP. Moreover, Laravel can be easily deployed on shared hosting plans, which are generally more affordable. On the other hand, Node.js applications are typically hosted on web servers capable of running Node.js, such as Express.js or Next.js. This may require specific hosting providers or dedicated servers, which can be more expensive but provide better performance and scalability.

In Summary, Laravel and Node.js differ in terms of scalability and performance, language and ecosystem, concurrency and event-driven programming, ease of development, community and support, and hosting and deployment options. Each framework has its strengths and weaknesses, allowing developers to choose the one that best suits their project requirements.

Advice on Laravel and Node.js
Needs advice
on
LaravelLaravel
and
Node.jsNode.js

What will be better Laravel or Node.js to handle a logistics portal which displays thousands (20-50k) of delivery data information in an interactive table (searchable, filterable), live delivery tracking, basic user management, and report creation?

Data comes usually in CSV (manually uploaded or via API from courier companies). Live tracking uses checks tracking numbers on the courier page using API.

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Replies (1)
Francis Rodrigues
Recommends
on
LaravelLaravelNode.jsNode.js

My question for you is: "Which one are you familiar with?" Following your needs, both could do it, but think about it. Now talking about Node.js, in my opinion, if you use JavaScript, there are lots of packages to support your entire project, including native ones for testing TDD and others for BDD. Also the best support on AWS (Amazon Web Services) and GCP (Google Cloud Platform).

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Needs advice
on
DjangoDjangoJavaJava
and
Node.jsNode.js

I am starting a new project to build a simple ERP system for small businesses, where the owners can also manage orders on their phones.

I have decided to use JavaScript & React on the front-end and MySQL for the database. But I am really struggling to pick a backend language. I'm familiar with Node.js, but when I search for ERP (CRM & order mgt) projects on Youtube, I see that most build with Python (Django). Many also recommend Java.

So I'm a little confused. Please advice.

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Replies (9)
Luiz H. Rapatão
Tech Lead at rapatao.com · | 8 upvotes · 208.9K views
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

There is no problem to keep using node.js for your backend. Keep in mind that you already have expertise in it, so you could focus on development instead of to learn a new syntax/framework. There are good libraries in node.js that could help you in the development (services, validations, integrations, etc) also keeps you with a single language to the whole system. Django, as far as I know, it will provide a solid base for you, but it could be too much for your purpose, also could be more complex than you could need. Java provides to you many frameworks to simplify your integrations also could achieve a good performance. Anyway, I recommend you to follow using node.js, since you already know the syntax/platform.

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Recommends
on
DjangoDjango

Django is best suited for your requirement and has a very good community base to reach out for any queries. I have myself built and seen a lot of stuffs which match your requirement.

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Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

Hello, Node.js is simply a better option than python if you wish to make your application real-time operations. Also Node.js is a better choice than python for server side development.

But let's get your problem now. For most ERP projects, Node.js is a better choice. Also, since you are already familiar with Node.js, continue with it. Personally, I think Node.js is way better than Django mainly because JS is the god of ERP projects. Java is a good counterpart though.

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Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

I personally suggest NodeJs as you are also familiar with it. Even nodeJS has its own strong frameworks such as NestJS, Loopback etc. And the community is pretty much strong though. If you are looking for a faster development , then always you can go for NodeJS. And its pretty fast though.

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Sinisha Mihajlovski
Design Lead | Senior Software Developer · | 3 upvotes · 199K views
Recommends
on
SugarCRMSugarCRM

Will you build it from scratch? There are some open source ERP/CRM solutions that you can use as a base for your solution. SugarCrm is an example. By looking at those, you can then decide which language you'll use for the backend.

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Ruslan Rayanov
Recommends

I can recommend you a flexible constructor for this purpose. To create a system, you only need sql, and you can connect to any database without any problems. Please see the introductory article about the features, and if you are interested, I can provide access to the test site. My contacts for communication are on the site page https://falconspace.site/docs/vvedenie-v-falcon-space--c-chego-nachat https://falconspace.site/for-it

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Nicolai Kamphenkel
Full-Stack-Engineer at Kamphenkel Datensysteme GmbH · | 2 upvotes · 197.5K views
Recommends
on
AdonisJSAdonisJSNode.jsNode.js

Hey if you are allready familar with nodejs then just go with it. There are some very nice frameworks out there that can be hold with the big ones.

Examples: AdonisJS or SailsJS

AdonisJS is even very similar like django.

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anas mattar
Technical Lead at DPO International · | 2 upvotes · 196.1K views
Recommends

I prefer to use Node.js because you have experainse in it and also you can do anything for this language.

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John Nguyen

Go with Node.js and use a framework. I can recommend NestJS or Fastifiy as a Backend Framework. They both have a strong community and Fastify is the successor of Express but much faster.

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Needs advice
on
DjangoDjangoLaravelLaravel
and
Node.jsNode.js

I am looking to make a website builder web app, where users can publish built websites with a custom or subdomain (much like Wix, Weebly, Squarespace, etc.), and I was wondering about any advice on which web framework to build it on? I currently know Node.js, but I would be excited to learn Laravel or Django if those would be better options. Any advice would be much appreciated!

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Replies (3)

The tools you mentioned are all backend focused frameworks. I will say, you can choose one of them as you may prefer (maybe Laravel and Django will be better since it's more organized than Node.js). But no matter what, if you will create a website builder application, today you'll need a frontend framework like Vue.js, React or Angular - or maybe Ember.js, Svelte and Meteor.

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Đam Lê Đình
Senior Software Engineer at NAB · | 6 upvotes · 362.7K views
Recommends
on
LaravelLaravel

If you use Nodejs, you should use one more frontend language like reactjs or angularjs. Laravel is the better option. They are more power for rendering.

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Recommends
on
AngularJSAngularJSReactReact

React or Angular bro!

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Needs advice
on
Node.jsNode.js
and
SpringSpring

I am provided with the opportunity to learn one of these technologies during my training. I have prior experience with Spring and found it tough and still haven't figured out when to use what annotations among the thousands of annotations provided. On the other hand, I am very proficient in Java data structures and algorithms (custom comparators, etc.)

I have used Node.js and found it interesting, but I am wondering If I am taking the risk of choosing a framework that has a comparatively lesser scope in the future. One advantage I see with the node.js is the number of tutorials available and the ease with which I can code.

Please recommend which path to take. Is Spring learnable, or should I spend my energy on learning Node.js instead?

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Replies (2)
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on
Node.jsNode.jsTypeScriptTypeScript

I do not know Spring or your company/specialty. Of course it must be learnable and I won't tell you to give up on anything. Java is and will remain valuable.

Regardless, I don't think "lesser scope" is a valid strike against Node.js here. Node.js fulfills JavaScript's original vision of an everywhere language and can run anywhere that Java can. It serves webpages, communicates with hardware, powers command line tools, and builds desktop applications. A huge complexity-saver for teams running many environments (my biggest regret is that it cannot run a microcontroller).

Node.js' biggest practical weakness is that JavaScript is less structured than Java. Luckily, the large influx of Java developers has been helping with this: gaps like constants and private properties are gradually filling in, and TypeScript firms up the types to the point where JavaScript looks a lot like Java.

Probably more potential competition from the larger pool of JS developers, but the compensation is allegedly similar so I guess there is a similar supply/demand situation.

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Recommends

hi this depends where you want to advance . If you want to work for an big aged company with a lot of legacy go the spring way (banks, insurances netflix etc ) if you want to go the new agile fast cloud way learn node js it is much more suited for cloud and micro service even spring cloud can do that as well but it is much more heavier

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Needs advice
on
ASP.NETASP.NETLaravelLaravel
and
Node.jsNode.js

Hi. We are planning to develop web, desktop, and mobile app for procurement, logistics, and contracts. Procure to Pay and Source to pay, spend management, supplier management, catalog management. ( similar to SAP Ariba, gap.com, coupa.com, ivalua.com vroozi.com, procurify.com

We got stuck when deciding which technology stack is good for the future. We look forward to your kind guidance that will help us.

We want to integrate with multiple databases with seamless bidirectional integration. What APIs and middleware available are best to achieve this? SAP HANA, Oracle, MySQL, MongoDB...

ASP.NET / Node.js / Laravel. ......?

Please guide us

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Replies (1)
Recommends
on
ASP.NETASP.NET

i recommended .NET because the library so rich, you can integrated any sources to computed , compiling, integrating, your apps to high complexity, easy to communicated with SAP BAPI. used Oracle DB, Cheers.

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Needs advice
on
LaravelLaravel
and
Node.jsNode.js

I would like to share my stack in Web/Mobile application Development for Mid Sized Applications.

Project-1 : Laravel + jQuery + Android Java + IOS Swift

Project-2 : Node.js + React + React Native + Electron.

This is my current Stack, Can you comment on my selection and add your thoughts if my choice is a perfect match? Thanks

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Replies (2)
John Clifford de Vera
Software Engineer at CircleYY · | 6 upvotes · 326.2K views
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

I would say go for Node.js since you probably would only build a REST API that would talk to the frontend and some communication with the database.

On the other hand, Laravel is a much heavier framework that follows MVC pattern. Since you don't need the V in the MVC of Laravel. You can go for a straight Express that just handles the API request and return a response.

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Nathan De Pachtere
Fullstack Developer at Alpsify · | 3 upvotes · 330.7K views
Recommends
on
FlutterFlutter
at

Hello Varun S,

Project-1 : If the Laravel part is an API, you should check Flutter or Quasar Framework for your frontend in order to reduce the development time and process.

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Eva Maciejko
Needs advice
on
ExpressJSExpressJSLaravelLaravel
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

Hello, I am a fullstack web developer. I have been working for a company with Java/ Spring Boot and client-side JavaScript(mainly jQuery, some AngularJS) for the past 4 years. As I wish to now work as a freelancer, I am faced with a dilemma: which stack to choose given my current knowledge and the state of the market?

I've heard PHP is very popular in the freelance world. I don't know PHP. However, I'm sure it wouldn't be difficult to learn since it has many similarities with Java (OOP). It seems to me that Laravel has similarities with Spring Boot (it's MVC and OOP). Also, people say Laravel works well with Vue.js, which is my favorite JS framework.

On the other hand, I already know the Javascript language, and I like Vue.js, so I figure I could go the fullstack Javascript route with ExpressJS. However, I am not sure if these techs are ripe for freelancing (with regards to RAD, stability, reliability, security, costs, etc.) Is it true that Express is almost always used with MongoDB? Because my experience is mostly with SQL databases.

The projects I would like to work on are custom web applications/websites for small businesses. I have developed custom ERPs before and found that Java was a good fit, except for it taking a long time to develop. I cannot make a choice, and I am constantly switching between trying PHP and Node.js/Express. Any real-world advice would be welcome! I would love to find a stack that I enjoy while doing meaningful freelance coding.

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Replies (10)
Recommends
on
Spring BootSpring Boot

Hi Eva, As you have solid experience with Spring already, you should jump into freelancing with that. It would be quite stressful to start freelancing with a tech stack you don't know well. Then in the background you can keep learning/practicing an alternative and switch over when you are confident enough (eg. 0.5-1 year later). I think you should learn Laravel as you already like it and find it easier. Express has better performance but that is not required for most of the small freelancer projects.

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Benoît Hubert
JavaScript Instructor at Wild Code School · | 6 upvotes · 684.4K views
Recommends
on
Spring BootSpring Boot

I think Patrik and Alex are right: if you're comfortable with Spring Boot already, you'll be more productive right from the start.

If you wish to learn something else besides, both Laravel and Express are good choices. They aren't in the same category of frameworks: Laravel is an all-in-one solution, while Express is more like "build your own stack from different parts". Which implies that you can use whatever you want as a database engine: MySQL or PostgreSQL are perfectly valid choices (in my school, we teach Express with MySQL, because SQL is still a big thing here in France, and a sought-after skill). You can use Sequelize or TypeORM which support all major SQL DBMS.

Express is widely used, but if you're seeking the JavaScript equivalent of Spring Boot or Laravel, you probably want to look at NestJS. The only potential downside is that it's still young, maintained by a small commmunity, compared to those behind Spring Boot and Laravel.

Bottom line: using a stack tech, that you enjoy and are comfortable with, matters. Spring Boot + Vue.js seem perfectly fine to me. But do forget jQuery if you're using Vue.js, React or Angular, because it will definitely bring more harm than good!

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Recommends
on
ExpressJSExpressJS

Looking at current technological trends and rise of JavaScript, you cannot go wrong with JavaScript. - There's an abundance of libraries to get most things done - You can use JavaScript for both the frontend and the backend - this allows you potentially share your logic/models/code across both stacks - A dynamic/interpreted language such as JavaScript is great for serverless (there's somewhat of a trend towards serverless aswell - especially in modern projects) - If you like/need static typing, you can always migrate seemlessly to Typescript - VueJS is a lightweight framework (compared to Angular), it has more GitHub stars and most would argue it's easier to work with (beginner friendly). Additionally most modern webapps do not use JQuery anymore (even though a lot of legacy projects continue to do so). You don't need JQuery if you use Vue/Angular/React

Additionally it doesn't seem like performance is a hugely important metric in your scenario, so JavaScript would suffice.

Note: These are all my opinions and what I've seen in the current market when recently searching for jobs.

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Muhammad Waleed
The Community Management · | 5 upvotes · 693K views
Recommends
on
Spring BootSpring Boot

I would definitely recommend you to go with Spring Boot + AngularJS + jQuery. Reasons: 1- You have an experience of 4 years with the above-mentioned stack. 2- As you mentioned that you wish to work as a freelancer, your stack is the perfect one for finding good bids with a little less effort than that of PHP + Laravel + Vue.js.

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Hi as someone who employs and select developers i agree with a lot almost sayed but think of what are your strengths and where you are or better where your customers are. If you search for big enterprise projects spring boot is ok sql is must and html css as well. if you want to go more to internet related companies (like airbnb, what sup, facebook ) or similar (and not asia) then react is a must node js as well. The libraries tools etc which are used you need to adopt fast. If asia then VUE is a must. but if you like small projects with individuals or like wordpress or similar then you can learn php but i think in 2020 it is wasted time. Same for python in that area. and i also see that we often have problem that developer at least must understand docker docker compose better as it works with kubernetes ,.. just my 5 cents

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Rubin Thomas
Software Cloud Developer at RUBIN THOMAS · | 4 upvotes · 623.9K views
Recommends
on
PerlPerlPHPPHPPythonPython

As a developer myself, I would recommend you not to restrict yourself to JAVA, PHP or any other language. New Tools/languages keep coming every day. If you do plan to move to freelancing. PHP has a lot of options in the freelance space and a lot of competition too.

Learning PHP is as simple as learning any other language. It depends merely on your interest.

Personally if you can code, you should not restrict yourself. I have had to code in many languages, PHP, Perl, shell script, Python, Java, Javascript, Ruby etc... I would keep your developing skills and logic, algorithms etc.. and increase your knowledge and experience in the different languages.

I agree with you JAVA is a lot more time consuming. But it also has its enterprise level scope.

At the same time learning a new language should not be a barrier for you to stop exploring what's out there and keeping your skills up to date. Learning new technologies should be your primary focus and getting project out of your stack helps you build a good reputation.

There are many options for you to pursue. Having an open mindset will help you move forward. If you look to learn now, you are setting yourself up for a brighter future.

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Alex Spieslechner
Recommends
on
Spring BootSpring Boot

in order to stay employable, I'd work with something you can deliver with. if I'd be your client and you'd have to get comfortable with a new stack, I would 100% not pay you for this startup time. learn new stuff in your free-time. or set aside time for learning.

that said, if you want to reorientate, php (even though i personally hate it) is extremely wide spread. but so are java and nodejs. so I'm not a fan of that argument... i recommend building something in each language, and see what you enjoy more. for me it was nodejs, because I already enjoy frontend JavaScript, and appreciate the ecosystem and community.

regarding expressjs and mongodb: yes, it is a goto solution for a lot of tutorials, because its as simple as it gets. especially wben using something like monk. BUT if you want to use mysql, posgres or similar, check out TypeORM, Prism or another ORM-like solution. you can use any db with express, and there's plenty of abstraction layers, which make your life easier. but i noticed that expressjs does a lot less "holding hands" compared to .net core (c#), or laravel (php). can be a pro or a con.

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Recommends
on
ExpressJSExpressJSLaravelLaravel

I like fullstack freelancers who stacks are clean as one of below

  1. PHP (laravel ) + Jquery + Bootstrap

  2. Python(Django) + Angular JS or VueJS

  3. NODEJS + REACTJS

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Recommends
on
ExpressJSExpressJS

Hey There, I would recommend going fullstack javascript since you already have experience with javascript on the front end it would be very easy to pickup node and express js. You can use sql with node and express if you please, but mongo is pretty easy to get going with.

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Ahmed Gamal

Please, try to work with your comfortable stack, here is some recommendation

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Muhammad Shaheer khan
Freelancer at Freelancer.com · | 9 upvotes · 612.3K views
Needs advice
on
DjangoDjangoMagentoMagento
and
Node.jsNode.js

Currently, I am a university student, and it is my second last semester with a major in Computer science. I want to start my career in full-stack web development. I know Python with Django + PHP with Laravel, and my focus is on learning MERN stack. I am a little bit confused as to which technology I should choose: Django or Magento or MERN stack.

#newbie

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Replies (2)
Recommends
on
ReactReact

I suggest you to go with MERN Stack (Mongo,express,react,Node). As you know python and django which is a plus point because you can use python and node as your backend and for front-end use react(easy to learn) and database of your choice.(Mongo or SQL)

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Moinul Moin
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

GO For MERN Stack... brother

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Max Loua
FullStack Dev at Nouvelles Donnes · | 3 upvotes · 374.1K views
Needs advice
on
Node.jsNode.jsRailsRails
and
Rails APIRails API

Currently working on my company's new saas, the main goal is to manage content and user. I'm familiar with the rails framework and how it is easy to code and deploy. The thing is I'm the only dev on the project, and in terms of the tech stack, there is no preference. However, because Node.js is everywhere and there is enough dev on the market, I am stuck between choosing Rails or Node.js. I don't mind implementing Vue.js or React on the frontend, but I need a solid argument to explain to people that aren't necessarily tech-savvy as to why we should choose Rails over Nodejs.

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Replies (6)
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

You are probably referring to ruby on rails for web development and nodejs for building the backend. Nodejs has frameworks such as express and next which not only provides a minimal code to build a backend but also gives the flexibility to try and experiment with the framework choices. For example you can have express framework + Passport for OAuth .... etc. The flexibility and the constant improvement of the language provides a good reason to opt for nodejs. Nodejs uses javascript which makes your code uniform when you are working full stack i.e react in front end and nodejs in backend.

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Recommends
on
Rails APIRails API

I'd use the following metaphor to non-technical people. Rails is like a prepackaged toolkit, which can get most of the common tasks done fairly with ease. Whereas, node.js with whatever backend framekwork of choice, is like a DIY toolkit assembled by mix-and-match different tools in a large tool shop. Of course, at times DIY toolkit can do better on specific tasks. Given that you are the only dev on the project, I'd assume that the resource is fairly limited. And looks like you are not building some next-gen super duper fast smart application. So Just go with the prepackaged toolkit then. Rails is a very opinionated framework, there're pros and cons to it. But thanks to that, many of the gems are coded with it in mind. For example, they are all designed with same naming convention. Many will work well together out-of-box, for example devise and cancancan. Besides, many stuff are built in the framework. For example, logging utility, csrf protection, session encryption, etc. Yes, many of those stuff may not be useful or necessary at the beginning of the project life-cycle. However, down the road, there is a good chance you will need some of those. And the moment you realize that you already have it, it's so delightful. In addition, it's usually easier to debug a rails app than a node app in my experience. Personally, the cases where I would pick node.js over rails would be projects either require a) high-performance, or b) certain core functionality that has been implemented by some node packages but not by any ruby gems. In term of performance, node has a clear advantage over any other major web frameworks, except the ones built with go. It's simply a language feature. Node allows developer to easily write code that runs db query, external api calls, or other stuff of that nature in parallel. And that is THE MOST COMMON performance bottleneck of web applications.

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Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 4 upvotes · 324.8K views
Recommends
on
Rails APIRails API
at

Rails is currently a very mature and feature complete framework.

It's the ideal one if you're the only dev for your project because you get so many things already baked-in the framework that you'd only need to deeply care about specific stuff.

I won't say any NodeJS framework isn't good enough but in my experience with NodeJS frameworks you have to code a lot of the things Rails already provides. There's many people in Twitter and IRL asking for a "Rails for JavaScript" framework.

And you know? In the early stages of any project we have to validate it first with real users/customers. With Rails you can get to production real quick and fast.

I'm going to mention some of the features you get from day 1 when you run rails new app_name:

  • File uploading with Active Storage
  • Rich text editor with Action Text
  • Emailing with Action Mailer
  • ORM, migrations, validations with Active Record
  • Web sockets with Action Cable
  • Internationalization
  • Modern frontend stuff with Webpacker

and more.

The JavaScript community is on its moment, growing and gathering more people everyday but the Rails community is also a big one and there's always going to be a Rails developer to hire whenever you're ready to hire someone.

I suggest you to go with Rails because is a good choice, gives you less things to worry about and it's a very good and mature framework.

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Dan Pickett
Co-Founder at Launch Academy · | 4 upvotes · 324.4K views
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

I hate to admit it, because I loved my time with Rails (and I still love the framework), I have a hard time justifying new Rails applications these days. Core team has made some tragic design decisions, and developers just don't perceive it as being "cool" any more. The latter is a terrible metric for which to base a technology decision, but I think you'll find it more difficult to recruit additional engineers if you choose Ruby on Rails.

Without knowing too much of the details, Node/Express (ideally with Typescript) seems like a better solution here, given you'll be building out the front-end in Vue or React. It might be worth looking at NestJS, as it's the closest I've seen to a well-formed opinionated framework on the Node side of things. We're also fans of Objection ORM.

I hope that's helpful!

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Jean-Pierre Pommet
Recommends
on
React on RailsReact on Rails

I need a solid argument to explain to people that aren't necessarily tech-savvy as to why we should choose Rails over Nodejs

Hi Max, it sounds like that you are proficient in both stacks and probably have a higher expertise in Rails (correct me if I am wrong) and since you are the only dev on a project, a good argument that comes to mind is probably the velocity and maturity (enterprise grade, battle tested in production) that Rails provide with proven success stories in the tech industry such as Airbnb, Stripes, Shopify to name a few. You can also make the argument that Rails is great to run the backend and React+Vue (and nodejs for tooling) is ideal for the front-end development (see or find companies example that use both). You can also build and show a prototype using both and share your experience which could help you find and forge the selling points to those non tech savvy folks, why not.

Eventually, are you going to have other developers on your project? if yes then you will need to take in account, onboarding and ramp up to contribution time when they are hired.

IMHO, I am not a fan of the debate Rails vs Nodejs, they are just tools at the disposal of the developer it's just a matter of figuring out what makes the most sense.

Let me know if you wanna discuss further, happy to help out!

ps: markdown preview on stack share... no good.

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Recommends
on
Rails APIRails API

Rails has advantages over node.js (specifically express) when working a more complicated backend. While Express has some speed advantages to Rails, this is mitigated if your software is more CPU intensive.

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Needs advice
on
DjangoDjango
and
Node.jsNode.js

I have learned both Python and JavaScript. I also tried my hand at Django. But i found it difficult to work with Django, on frontend its Jinja format is very confusing and limited. I have not tried Node.js yet and unsure which tool to go ahead with. I want an internship as soon as possible so please answer keeping that in mind.

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Replies (7)
Recommends
on
DjangoDjango

If you are currently not working my first suggestion is to study both the frameworks and get a good grasp of those. If you didn't get confident with Django in the first place you should reconsider going back and study more. Get a video course with some code-along and produce some simple application you can showcase on your interviews. If you already took a course take a different one. Another trainer could be more effective and you could experience something new with different excercises. There are lots of both free and paid courses out there. When you will get confident with Django get your feet wet with Node.js because it surely worth it. Node is very different from Django from some perspective, it looks more like an asynchronous version of Flask to me. Be sure to have a good knowledge of ES6 first, because it will be really useful to understand the Node best practices. Study as much as you can now if you are not working. It will supercharge you for the future...

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Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 10 upvotes · 884.3K views
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js
at

From my experience of the early startup world, a majority of companies these days use Node.js. Python and Go are the next biggest languages, but significantly smaller than Node.

However, if you're having trouble with the front end aspect of Django, using Node probably won't make that easier for you. You'll have a lot more options between front end frameworks (React, Vue.js, Angular 2) , but they'll definitely take more time to learn than Django's templating system.

Think about whether you want to focus on front end or back end for now, and make a decision from there.

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Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

I would suggest to go with js, it's the craze now when you enter into the stack it has variety of options and tools that you can adopt , and more than that the demand for js engineers is exponentially increasing and js can do magic in any type of application or architecture.

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George Krachtopoulos
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

I had the same question myself a few months ago. I finally chose Node.js, and it was one of the best options I did back then. From when I started programming, I always believed that Python was for me the best language, secure and stable. However, it is not flexible for web development, there are more packages & libraries that are built and work only with JavaScript / TypeScript, and the community, resources & support is much bigger. I was also fascinated by the Django ORM, which I still am, & the admin interface. But those are things, that can be replaces by other tools, such as TypeORM, and the admin interface was not needed at all finally for my case. I know understand that Python is not the language that I should use everywhere and every time, but I can say that it is really good for algorithms, computer science, maths, statistics, analytics & AI. To be honest, I chose TypeScript (TS) with Node.js & Express, because it has auto-completion and "strict" code checking. I hope this helps you, and let you take a look at various aspects of choosing a programming language to work with.

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Yousuf Jawwad
Principal Software Architect at Breu Inc. · | 4 upvotes · 480.2K views
Recommends
on
JinjaJinja

Jinja is a template rendering engine and you will encounter some sort of template rendering engine in each language. Jinja is a pretty standard tool and almost every language has some sort of Jinja equivalent. Ruby has Liquid, Node has Nunjucks, Java has Jinjava, Go's default templating engine is easy to pick up if you know Jinja, Helm charts are easier to pick if know Jinja . So learning Jinja is a good thing.

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Recommends
on
DjangoDjango

Actually, you could get very good solution with implementing BE and admin panel with Django and FE with React.js or Vue.js. it will provide you a pretty flexible and powerful environment.

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Recommends
on
DjangoDjango

If you already know some django stuff you should keep that learning path. And for the job if you really want an internship you should learn to make rest APIs using django or nodejs, and a front end that consumes those APIs using some framework

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Decisions about Laravel and Node.js

We choose Next.js for our React framework because it's very minimal and has a very organized file structure. Also, it offers key features like zero setups, automatic server rendering and code splitting, typescript support. Our app requires some loading time to process the video, server-side rendering will allow our website to display faster than client-side rending.

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I am planning to develop project management system SAAS based. Can any one help me with selection of platforms from Django or Laravel and for database MongoDB or Firebase/Firestore or MySql? On front end I am going to use Quasar Framework (VueJS). Note : project will be Webapp, Mobile app and desktop app.

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Omran Jamal
CTO & Co-founder at Bonton Connect · | 7 upvotes · 566.3K views

We actually initially wrote a lot of networking code in Kotlin but the complexities involved prompted us to try and compile NodeJS for Android and port over all the networking logic to Node and communicate with node over the Java Native Interface.

This turned out to be a great decision considering our battery usage fell by 40% and rate of development increased by a factor of 2.

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washie mugo
Chose
DjangoDjango
over
LaravelLaravel

i find python quite resourceful. given the bulk of libraries that python has and the trends of the tech i find django which runs on python to be the framework of choice to the upcoming web services and application. Laravel on the other hand which is powered by PHP is also quite resourceful and great for startups and common web applications.

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As a small team, we wanted to pick the framework which allowed us to move quickly. There's no option better than Rails. Not having to solve the fundamentals means we can more quickly build our feature set. No other framework can beat ActiveRecord in terms of integration & ease-of use. To top it all of, there's a lot of attention paid to security in the framework, making almost everything safe-by-default.

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Hey guys,

My backend set up is Prisma / GraphQL-Yoga at the moment, and I love it. It's so intuitive to learn and is really neat on the frontend too, however, there were a few gotchas when I was learning! Especially around understanding how it all pieces together (the stack). There isn't a great deal of information out there on exactly how to put into production my set up, which is a backend set up on a Digital Ocean droplet with Prisma/GraphQL Yoga in a Docker Container using Next & Apollo Client on the frontend somewhere else. It's such a niche subject, so I bet only a few hundred people have got a website with this stack in production. Anyway, I wrote a blog post to help those who might need help understanding it. Here it is, hope it helps!

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Christopher Wray
Web Developer at Soltech LLC · | 6 upvotes · 390.5K views

When I started on this project as the sole developer, I was new to web development and I was looking at all of the web frameworks available for the job. I had some experience with Ruby on Rails and I had looked into .net for a bit, but when I found Laravel, it felt like the best framework for me to get the product to market. What made me choose Laravel was the easy to read documentation and active community. Rails had great documentation, but lacked some features built in that I wanted out of the box, while .net had a ton of video documentation tutorials, but nothing as straightforward as Laravels. So far, I am happy with the decision I made, and looking forward to the website release!

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This basically came down to two things: performance on compute-heavy tasks and a need for good tooling. We used to have a Meteor based Node.js application which worked great for RAD and getting a working prototype in a short time, but we felt pains trying to scale it, especially when doing anything involving crunching data, which Node sucks at. We also had bad experience with tooling support for doing large scale refactorings in Javascript compared to the best-in-class tools available for Java (IntelliJ). Given the heavy domain and very involved logic we wanted good tooling support to be able to do great refactorings that are just not possible in Javascript. Java is an old warhorse, but it performs fantastically and we have not regretted going down this route, avoiding "enterprise" smells and going as lightweight as we can, using Jdbi instead of Persistence API, a homegrown Actor Model library for massive concurrency, etc ...

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I was researching multiple high performance, concurent//parallel languages for the needs of authentication and authorization server, to be built on microservice architecture and Linux OS. Node.js with its asynchronous behavior and event loop suits the case best. Python Django & Flash turns to be slower and .NET Core & Framework wasn't the best choice for the Linux environment at the time (summer 2018).

I also tested Go lang and Rust, although they didn't meet the quick prototyping criteria as both languages are young and lacking libraries or battle-tested ORM.

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Radoslaw Fabisiak

We builded Duomly with: BE: Node.JS & Nest.JS & TypeScript & PostgreSQL and FE: React & Sass & Javascript.

The whole of the stack is JS related what helps us to keep development on a track. When building backend we decided to go go for TS & Nest.js because we had experience with Javascript and still wanted to have control over types.

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Pros of Laravel
Pros of Node.js
  • 553
    Clean architecture
  • 392
    Growing community
  • 370
    Composer friendly
  • 344
    Open source
  • 324
    The only framework to consider for php
  • 220
    Mvc
  • 210
    Quickly develop
  • 168
    Dependency injection
  • 156
    Application architecture
  • 143
    Embraces good community packages
  • 73
    Write less, do more
  • 71
    Orm (eloquent)
  • 66
    Restful routing
  • 57
    Database migrations & seeds
  • 55
    Artisan scaffolding and migrations
  • 41
    Great documentation
  • 40
    Awesome
  • 30
    Awsome, Powerfull, Fast and Rapid
  • 29
    Build Apps faster, easier and better
  • 28
    Eloquent ORM
  • 26
    Promotes elegant coding
  • 26
    Modern PHP
  • 26
    JSON friendly
  • 25
    Most easy for me
  • 24
    Easy to learn, scalability
  • 23
    Beautiful
  • 22
    Blade Template
  • 21
    Test-Driven
  • 15
    Security
  • 15
    Based on SOLID
  • 13
    Clean Documentation
  • 13
    Easy to attach Middleware
  • 13
    Cool
  • 12
    Simple
  • 12
    Convention over Configuration
  • 11
    Easy Request Validatin
  • 10
    Simpler
  • 10
    Fast
  • 10
    Easy to use
  • 9
    Get going quickly straight out of the box. BYOKDM
  • 9
    Its just wow
  • 8
    Laravel + Cassandra = Killer Framework
  • 8
    Simplistic , easy and faster
  • 8
    Friendly API
  • 7
    Less dependencies
  • 7
    Super easy and powerful
  • 6
    Great customer support
  • 6
    Its beautiful to code in
  • 5
    Speed
  • 5
    Eloquent
  • 5
    Composer
  • 5
    Minimum system requirements
  • 5
    Laravel Mix
  • 5
    Easy
  • 5
    The only "cons" is wrong! No static method just Facades
  • 5
    Fast and Clarify framework
  • 5
    Active Record
  • 5
    Php7
  • 4
    Ease of use
  • 4
    Laragon
  • 4
    Laravel casher
  • 4
    Easy views handling and great ORM
  • 4
    Laravel Forge and Envoy
  • 4
    Cashier with Braintree and Stripe
  • 3
    Laravel Passport
  • 3
    Laravel Spark
  • 3
    Intuitive usage
  • 3
    Laravel Horizon and Telescope
  • 3
    Laravel Nova
  • 3
    Rapid development
  • 2
    Laravel Vite
  • 2
    Scout
  • 2
    Deployment
  • 1
    Succint sintax
  • 1.4K
    Npm
  • 1.3K
    Javascript
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 1K
    High-performance
  • 805
    Open source
  • 486
    Great for apis
  • 477
    Asynchronous
  • 423
    Great community
  • 390
    Great for realtime apps
  • 296
    Great for command line utilities
  • 84
    Websockets
  • 83
    Node Modules
  • 69
    Uber Simple
  • 59
    Great modularity
  • 58
    Allows us to reuse code in the frontend
  • 42
    Easy to start
  • 35
    Great for Data Streaming
  • 32
    Realtime
  • 28
    Awesome
  • 25
    Non blocking IO
  • 18
    Can be used as a proxy
  • 17
    High performance, open source, scalable
  • 16
    Non-blocking and modular
  • 15
    Easy and Fun
  • 14
    Easy and powerful
  • 13
    Future of BackEnd
  • 13
    Same lang as AngularJS
  • 12
    Fullstack
  • 11
    Fast
  • 10
    Scalability
  • 10
    Cross platform
  • 9
    Simple
  • 8
    Mean Stack
  • 7
    Great for webapps
  • 7
    Easy concurrency
  • 6
    Typescript
  • 6
    Fast, simple code and async
  • 6
    React
  • 6
    Friendly
  • 5
    Control everything
  • 5
    Its amazingly fast and scalable
  • 5
    Easy to use and fast and goes well with JSONdb's
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 5
    Great speed
  • 5
    Fast development
  • 4
    It's fast
  • 4
    Easy to use
  • 4
    Isomorphic coolness
  • 3
    Great community
  • 3
    Not Python
  • 3
    Sooper easy for the Backend connectivity
  • 3
    TypeScript Support
  • 3
    Blazing fast
  • 3
    Performant and fast prototyping
  • 3
    Easy to learn
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Scales, fast, simple, great community, npm, express
  • 3
    One language, end-to-end
  • 3
    Less boilerplate code
  • 2
    Npm i ape-updating
  • 2
    Event Driven
  • 2
    Lovely
  • 1
    Creat for apis
  • 0
    Node

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Laravel
Cons of Node.js
  • 54
    PHP
  • 33
    Too many dependency
  • 23
    Slower than the other two
  • 17
    A lot of static method calls for convenience
  • 15
    Too many include
  • 13
    Heavy
  • 9
    Bloated
  • 8
    Laravel
  • 7
    Confusing
  • 5
    Too underrated
  • 4
    Not fast with MongoDB
  • 1
    Slow and too much big
  • 1
    Not using SOLID principles
  • 1
    Difficult to learn
  • 46
    Bound to a single CPU
  • 45
    New framework every day
  • 40
    Lots of terrible examples on the internet
  • 33
    Asynchronous programming is the worst
  • 24
    Callback
  • 19
    Javascript
  • 11
    Dependency hell
  • 11
    Dependency based on GitHub
  • 10
    Low computational power
  • 7
    Very very Slow
  • 7
    Can block whole server easily
  • 7
    Callback functions may not fire on expected sequence
  • 4
    Breaking updates
  • 4
    Unstable
  • 3
    Unneeded over complication
  • 3
    No standard approach
  • 1
    Bad transitive dependency management
  • 1
    Can't read server session

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

What is Laravel?

It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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What are some alternatives to Laravel and Node.js?
Symfony
It is written with speed and flexibility in mind. It allows developers to build better and easy to maintain websites with PHP..
CodeIgniter
CodeIgniter is a proven, agile & open PHP web application framework with a small footprint. It is powering the next generation of web apps.
Django
Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
CakePHP
It makes building web applications simpler, faster, while requiring less code. A modern PHP 7 framework offering a flexible database access layer and a powerful scaffolding system.
Rails
Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.
See all alternatives