Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Discord

1K
1K
+ 1
758
Slack

79.1K
59.2K
+ 1
6K
Add tool

Discord vs. Slack - Help me Decide


In mankind's history, there’s been an ever-growing need for effective communication amongst individuals of different backgrounds, races and in different locations. Our world’s technological achievement has led to the creation of various tools that make communication, between a wide range of audiences, seamless.

In this article, we will compare two popular tools used for communication on a global scale:

  1. Discord, which is mostly known for enabling communication among gamers.
  2. Slack, which is mostly reckoned for communication within work teams.

Let's dive right in!

General Overview

s_58159A8E75D397C341D5454276F43F7C6312126EA50EDBA1807866228087C4EB_1545499141934_image.png

Discord, on one hand, is a proprietary VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) application and digital content distribution platform. It is designed to aid video gaming communities by enabling users to communicate via video, audio, images and text as the need may be. It was first released in May 2015.

linux_screenshot.png

Slack, on the other hand, is a cloud-based collaboration software used by businesses and teams as some sort of virtual office where conversations happen, decisions are made, and useful information is shared.

Discord and Slack are generally very similar, both being software used by teams for communication within an environment that is sub-categorized into channels for effective organization of discussions. The major difference between these tools is in their target audiences and as a result, they possess different strengths feature-wise.

Target Audience

Slack primarily targets being the communication tool for businesses. In their words "Slack is where your team comes together to collaborate, important information can be found by the right people, and your tools pipe in information when and where you need it.” Discord, however, targets the gaming community. It aims to stand as the go-to communication platform for gamers.

As a result of the different audiences targeted, Slack focuses on features that are business-enabling such as audit, document management, identity management, and searching. Discord, on the other hand, focuses on chat, voice calls, and high-speed performance.

On the subject of suitability, one could argue that a platform that can be used for gaming where split seconds are important, would definitely suffice for real-time communication and information distribution within businesses.

Common Features

Both platforms have very similar features. They both support text, audio and video communications, files sharing, channels, direct-messaging, one-click invite system, advanced search, notifications, multiple team support, push notifications on mobile, bots etc.

Because their target audiences are different, each of these communication tools tend to promote some features above others. For Slack features like file sharing and direct integration with over 800 applications would suffice. For Discord, its audio chat room feature is a case in point.

Performance

In this section, we will look into the technical specifications of both platforms as well as highlight their resource consumption capabilities.

Slack runs on the web and the following Operating Systems: Chrome, iOS, Android, Mac OS and Windows. It permits screen sharing and allows for integration with a wide range of productivity tools used by businesses for various tasks. It text chats, allows file sharing (media inclusive), private and public channels and advanced search.

On the topic of resource consumption, Slack isn't very much favoured as it is widely observed that CPU and memory usage increase linearly as you add more accounts to the Slack desktop client. There’s even a famous joke that tells how in the past, scientists sent people to the moon with computers that ran on just a few kilobytes of RAM, whereas modern devices with over 2GB of RAM have a hard time running Slack.

Like Slack, Discord also supports usage on a wide range of platforms from the web, Android, iOS and Mac, to Windows and Linux. In addition to text chatting, it allows for audio and video communication. It also permits file sharing (media files inclusive) and message deletion is allowed, although all messages are permanently stored on the server.

Note: This means that whatever messages an individual deletes, they are only deleted for that individual alone.

Discord also supports advanced search, private and public channels as well as user groups.

On the resource consumption side, Discord consumes slightly lesser RAM than Slack does, especially during heavy usage.

The desktop client for both platforms are built with Electron and this means that every update also comes with Chromium( the over 20 million lines of code, ~30MB [packaged] Web runtime), Node and all the other Electron components unless the update is a delta or differential update.

Note: RAM consumption isn’t always what most people (who complain about these tools) think it is. Naturally, the operating system is optimized to pull up RAM from places where it's not in use whenever it needs it. This means that after making use of memory, these tools will not dump memory until the system needs it for something else as there is a chance of the application needing it again. On this ground, the high resource consumption claims are somewhat dismissable as it is determined by an individual’s usage.

Pricing

Both platforms operate a "freemium model." This means that basic features are offered and accessible at no cost at all while users have to pay to unlock extra (premium) features.

Slack has three pricing tiers — Free, Standard, and Plus with prices ranging from $0 to $12.50 per month when billed annually and $0 to $15 per month when billed monthly. A primary differentiating factor among these tiers is in the amount of storage available and the number of integrations allowed which is 5GB and 10 integrations respectively for the free tier.

On Discord, users can access most of its features on the free plan and there is no limit to the number of members allowed per server. There is also the optional upgrade available; the Discord Nitro subscription model unlocks a few more (extra) features.

Slack, on the other hand, has a very limited free version which restricts access to just 10K of your team's most recent messages and 10 third-party or custom integrations. Access to most of its features (e.g shared channels, single-channel guests, multi-channel guests, OAuth with Google, voice and video calls, screen sharing etc.) are tied to the paid version.

This might be somewhat alarming as some of these are basic features that one would expect to be available for free just like on Discord.

Integrations

Slack supports over 800+ application integrations for different purposes. It integrates seamlessly with the following tools: Asana, Sentry, Trello, Guru, Adobe CC, GitHub, Dropbox, MailChimp, and dozens of other tools that can be found here. These enable teams to keep everything about their discussions in one place and properly organize work and information distribution.

Discord on its part doesn’t support nearly as many integrations as Slack does, however, its rich presence feature makes it possible for developers to create experiences that allow players to jump into games with friends, spectate during matches and send party invites. As described on the official website, rich presence allows you to leverage the totally overhauled "Now Playing" section in a Discord user's profile to help people play your game together.

Conclusion

Slack and Discord are both amazing communication and collaboration tools for teams. They are specifically engineered for different audiences, however, the striking similarities in the features offered indicate that both platforms would suffice in more use cases than generally intended.

Hence, it is mostly a thing of preference in cases where both platforms meet the requirements of the individual.

Further Reading

Find more information on this topic via the following links:

Discord vs Slack: What are the differences?

What is Discord? All-in-one voice and text chat for gamers that’s free, secure, and works on both your desktop and phone. Discord is a modern free voice & text chat app for groups of gamers. Our resilient Erlang backend running on the cloud has built in DDoS protection with automatic server failover.

What is Slack? Bring all your communication together in one place. Imagine all your team communication in one place, instantly searchable, available wherever you go. That’s Slack. All your messages. All your files. And everything from Twitter, Dropbox, Google Docs, Asana, Trello, GitHub and dozens of other services. All together.

Discord can be classified as a tool in the "Web and Video Conferencing" category, while Slack is grouped under "Group Chat & Notifications".

"Fast and easy set-ups and connections" is the primary reason why developers consider Discord over the competitors, whereas "Easy to integrate with" was stated as the key factor in picking Slack.

Airbnb, Dropbox, and Medium are some of the popular companies that use Slack, whereas Discord is used by Bitupper, Kistriver, and SuperBuddy. Slack has a broader approval, being mentioned in 4796 company stacks & 3483 developers stacks; compared to Discord, which is listed in 45 company stacks and 38 developer stacks.

Advice on Discord and Slack
Needs advice
on
Zoom
and
Discord

I want to host an online Jeopardy game with less than 30 participants. During each round of the game, I'll stream some videos. The point is to gather friends together to play the Jeopardy game and watch random stuff. Please let me know if there's a more suitable platform other than Discord and Zoom. Thanks, everyone!

See more
Replies (1)
Rural Anemone
Head Devoloper/coder at Super Smash Eternal · | 2 upvotes · 80K views

Personally, I think that Discord works much better than anything else, even if you don't have Nitro (which is what they call their premium plan). You could seriously do this Jeopardy thing with just Discord (and maybe a bot to make it easier)

Zoom would only let you have a crappy meeting that hackers could easily join. Discord actually has DDoS protection, Zoom just has things that can easily be bypassed.

And if you do want Nitro, it's only $9/mo or $99/yr

See more
Needs advice
on
Slack
Discord
and
Gitter

From a StackShare Community member: “We’re about to start a chat group for our open source project (over 5K stars on GitHub) so we can let our community collaborate more closely. The obvious choice would be Slack (k8s and a ton of major projects use it), but we’ve seen Gitter (webpack uses it) for a lot of open source projects, Discord (Vue.js moved to them), and as of late I’m seeing Spectrum more and more often. Does anyone have experience with these or other alternatives? Is it even worth assessing all these options, or should we just go with Slack? Some things that are important to us: free, all the regular integrations (GitHub, Heroku, etc), mobile & desktop apps, and open source is of course a plus."

See more
Replies (4)
Arnaud Lemercier
Expert En Dveloppement Web Et Systmes Dinformations, Designer UX, UI, Co-grant at Wixiweb · | 4 upvotes · 119.5K views
Recommends
Discord
at

We use Discord to tracking some action and errors (logs / alerting / assertion). it's free and simple to use with mobile application et notifications

See more
Rebecca Driscoll
Recommends
Slack
at

We use Slack to increase productivity by simplifying communication and putting Slack in the middle of our communication workflow #Communications #Collaboration

See more
Michael Ionita
Recommends
Slack
at

We use Slack because we can let "tools talk to us" and automate processes in our dev team using bots.

See more
Julien Tanay
Lead DevOps. Every day product hacker. at Dior · | 2 upvotes · 116K views
Recommends
Discord
at

Our Discord Server is our n°1 community stop; we gather feedback from our users from here, discuss about new features, announce new releases, and so on.

We even use it for internal meetings and calls !

See more
View all (4)
Decisions about Discord and Slack
Chose
Discord
over
Zoom

as many people say that you can only hold 30 to 10 people in one discord call if you were to make a server and add a chat or a VC you can hold up to 99 which is more than zoom and you can also use the text chat, general chat or anything else that you add and the best part you can hold pretty much infinite people I have personally seen servers with up to 100k people in it. One of the better parts is that you don't necessarily have to download it you can search it up on google and make an account it's as easy as that. Another thing is due to the original purpose of the website/app is that it's very customizable meaning that your students can customize heir profile pictures and names, but not to worry in a discord server you can have it where only you can change their nicknames so let's say things get too confusing or you want to be able to see who they really are you can just change it to their name. One last thing I will say is that you can have customizable ranks and so on so if you desire to split people into teams you can do so and with that, you can customize what they can do like give people ranks or de-rank them. Like I mentioned earlier about VC's you can also screen share and do videos so you can see their screen or their face.

See more
Remotor Consulting
at Remotor Consulting Group · | 10 upvotes · 48.6K views

Keybase is a powerful and secure team-organizing software. And because Keybase is so transparently good at what it does, Keybase is a foundational software that facilitates the future of work: effective, inclusive, secure Remote Teams.

Keybase is a free, end-to-end encrypted, open-source program with almost limitless flexibility. Each Keybase user or team is a unique cryptographic identity. Each message or interaction that a user has with a team or other user, is verifiable and digitally-signed. Custom combinations of users/teams/bots, can be designed to catalyze Remote Teams of all kinds, this process can also be automated. Keybase includes Git integration for versioning, bots from multiple platforms to facilitate audio/video-conferencing, a Cryptocurrency wallet, and many advanced privacy features to make you more or less traceable.

Services like Slack and Discord are centralized platforms that perform analytics on your behavior and can sell or leak this data to 3rd parties. Any audio/video features available within Slack or Discord, are bound to be less secure and less flexible than excellent alternatives such as Jitsi. Slack and Discord do have a fun, causal feel to them, which can potentially facilitate social engagement in certain conditions (also many users are already on these platforms).

Centralized and Proprietary team platforms such as Discord and Slack have a large market presence (at least in the USA) based on their first-mover advantage, name recognition, and network effects from size. However these products do not have the flexibility or power of Keybase. Keybase excels on its own excellence, and also has an open and active developer community.

Find us on Keybase: @remotorteam (Keybase username) @remotor.public (Public Keybase Team)

See more
Luke Carr
CEO at Omnio Interactive · | 16 upvotes · 151.4K views

We tried out a handful of communication tools including Slack, Microsoft Teams, and Google Hangouts Chat, before settling with Mattermost.

The customisability offered through your server's system console is unrivalled and in some ways overwhelming with the sheer amount of options that you're provided with.

All communication tools share 99% of their UI with each other, and Mattermost is no different, but that's not a bad thing. It also seems to have a less cluttered interface than the others we had tried, although I can't pinpoint the specific design choice that is the reason for this.

The fact that we can have control over all of our data (we're self-hosting it through AWS on a single EC2 instance) is also a great plus which none of the options that we looked into offered.

See more
Get Advice from developers at your company using Private StackShare. Sign up for Private StackShare.
Learn More
Pros of Discord
Pros of Slack
  • 55
    Unlimited Users
  • 52
    Unlimited Channels
  • 48
    Easy to use
  • 45
    Fast and easy set-ups and connections
  • 45
    Voice Chat
  • 41
    Clean UI
  • 39
    Mobile Friendly
  • 37
    Free
  • 29
    Android App
  • 25
    Mention system
  • 25
    Customizable notifications on per channel basis
  • 24
    Customizable ranks/permissions
  • 20
    IOS app
  • 20
    Good code embedding
  • 18
    Vast Webhook Support
  • 16
    Dark mode
  • 14
    Roles
  • 14
    Easy context switching between work and home
  • 12
    Bot control
  • 12
    Great Customer Support
  • 12
    Great Communities
  • 12
    Easy to develop for
  • 12
    Very Resource Friendly
  • 11
    Robust
  • 11
    Video Call Conference
  • 11
    Video call meeting
  • 10
    Sharing screen layer
  • 10
    Able to hold 99 people in one call
  • 9
    Great browser experience
  • 9
    Shares screen with other member
  • 9
    Cool
  • 9
    Easy Server Setup and joining system
  • 8
    Easy
  • 7
    Easy to code bots for
  • 7
    Better than Zoom
  • 7
    Lower bandwidth requirements than competitors
  • 4
    Noice
  • 4
    Everyone look at my con (it's a pro disguised as a con)
  • 3
    Not got wierd emojis like everything made by google
  • 2
    Easily set up custom emoji
  • 1.2K
    Easy to integrate with
  • 877
    Excellent interface on multiple platforms
  • 848
    Free
  • 694
    Mobile friendly
  • 690
    People really enjoy using it
  • 330
    Great integrations
  • 315
    Flexible notification preferences
  • 197
    Unlimited users
  • 184
    Strong search and data archiving
  • 155
    Multi domain switching support
  • 80
    Easy to use
  • 40
    Beautiful
  • 27
    Hubot support
  • 22
    Unread/read control
  • 21
    Slackbot
  • 19
    Permalink for each messages
  • 17
    Text snippet with highlighting
  • 15
    Quote message easily
  • 14
    Per-room notification
  • 13
    Awesome integration support
  • 12
    IRC gateway
  • 12
    Star for each message / attached files
  • 11
    Good communication within a team
  • 11
    Dropbox Integration
  • 10
    Jira Integration
  • 10
    Slick, search is great
  • 9
    New Relic Integration
  • 8
    Great communication tool
  • 8
    Combine All Services Quickly
  • 8
    Asana Integration
  • 7
    Awesomeness
  • 7
    This tool understands developers
  • 7
    Google Drive Integration
  • 6
    Replaces email
  • 6
    BitBucket integration
  • 6
    XMPP gateway
  • 6
    Twitter Integration
  • 6
    Google Docs Integration
  • 5
    GREAT Customer Support / Quick Response to Feedback
  • 5
    Jenkins Integration
  • 5
    Guest and Restricted user control
  • 4
    Gathers all my communications in one place
  • 4
    Excellent multi platform internal communication tool
  • 4
    GitHub integration
  • 4
    Mention list view
  • 3
    Easy to start working with
  • 3
    Visual Studio Integration
  • 3
    Perfect implementation of chat + integrations
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Easy to add a reaction
  • 3
    Clean UI
  • 3
    Timely while non intrusive
  • 3
    Great on-boarding
  • 3
    Threaded chat
  • 2
    Intuitive, easy to use, great integrations
  • 2
    Simplicity
  • 2
    Great interface
  • 2
    So much better than email
  • 2
    Message Actions
  • 2
    Great Channel Customization
  • 2
    It's basically an improved (although closed) IRC
  • 2
    Eases collaboration for geographically dispersed teams
  • 2
    Android app
  • 1
    Great API
  • 1
    Very customizable
  • 1
    API
  • 1
    Easy remote communication
  • 1
    Get less busy
  • 1
    Targetprocess integration
  • 1
    Better User Experience
  • 1
    Finally with terrible "threading"—I miss Flowdock
  • 1
    Archive Importing
  • 1
    Great Support Team
  • 1
    Complete with plenty of Electron BLOAT
  • 1
    Markdown
  • 1
    Multi work-space support
  • 1
    Flexible and Accessible
  • 1
    Travis CI integration
  • 1
    It's the coolest IM ever
  • 1
    I was 666 star :D
  • 1
    Community
  • 1
    Dev communication Made Easy
  • 1
    Integrates with just about everything
  • 0
    Easy to useL
  • 0
    Platforms

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Discord
Cons of Slack
  • 9
    Not as many integrations as Slack
  • 8
    For gamers
  • 4
    Limited file size
  • 3
    Sends data to US Gov
  • 3
    Discord is great, what are you talking about?
  • 3
    For everyone
  • 2
    Are u mad u ever heard of DMs???
  • 1
    Unsupportive Support
  • 1
    Suspected Pedophiles in few servers
  • 1
    What i mean by this is someone said u cant chat lol
  • 1
    Undescriptive in global ban reasons
  • 0
    Zoom is WAY better bc you can't even chat on Discord
  • 12
    Can be distracting depending on how you use it
  • 6
    Requires some management for large teams
  • 5
    Limit messages history
  • 4
    Too expensive
  • 4
    You don't really own your messages
  • 3
    Too many notifications by default

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

What is Discord?

Discord is a modern free voice & text chat app for groups of gamers. Our resilient Erlang backend running on the cloud has built in DDoS protection with automatic server failover.

What is Slack?

Imagine all your team communication in one place, instantly searchable, available wherever you go. That’s Slack. All your messages. All your files. And everything from Twitter, Dropbox, Google Docs, Asana, Trello, GitHub and dozens of other services. All together.

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Jobs that mention Discord and Slack as a desired skillset
What companies use Discord?
What companies use Slack?
See which teams inside your own company are using Discord or Slack.
Sign up for Private StackShareLearn More

Sign up to get full access to all the companiesMake informed product decisions

What tools integrate with Discord?
What tools integrate with Slack?

Sign up to get full access to all the tool integrationsMake informed product decisions

Blog Posts

Sep 29 2020 at 7:36PM

WorkOS

+17
6
2349
+2
1
883
+42
46
38954
What are some alternatives to Discord and Slack?
Skype
Skype’s text, voice and video make it simple to share experiences with the people that matter to you, wherever they are.
Zoom
Zoom unifies cloud video conferencing, simple online meetings, and cross platform group chat into one easy-to-use platform. Our solution offers the best video, audio, and screen-sharing experience across Zoom Rooms, Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, and H.323/SIP room systems.
Gitter
Free chat rooms for your public repositories. A bit like IRC only smarter. Chats for private repositories as well as organisations.
Google Hangouts
Message contacts, start free video or voice calls, and hop on a conversation with one person or a group.
WhatsApp
It is a cross-platform mobile messaging app for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia. It allows users to send text messages and voice messages, make voice and video calls, and share images, documents, user locations, and other media.
See all alternatives
Reviews of Discord and Slack
Review of
Slack

Today the impossible happened, our beloved Slack crashed sending chaos into offices around the globe. “Wow, how am I now going to vote for the flavour of our new office candy???”, I thought. But even though it might not have felt like it, everything else around us was still working: the world was still spinning, South Korea was winning over Germany at the World Cup, and today’s quotas and goals had to be met. In these situations, people most often turn towards traditional messaging tools like messenger, WhatsApp or email and hope for the best — that Slack will be back up soon. However, these temporary remedies are not without their complications: undelivered messages that you thought were read, lost documents, mental breakdowns, wasted time, etc.… In general, for us it creates a problematic gap in our office chat history.

But what if I told you that these crashes could potentially never occur again?

Yes, this is real life, and it’s exactly what mesh technology is about so we are going to explain it. In this scenario, if Slack ran with mesh networks, its users would not have been affected by its current technology’s single point of failure, which in this case was the crash of the server.

Lol okay, how is this possible bc this is real life???

Mesh networks might not sound familiar to everyone so let’s compare it with other well-known networking topologies. Consider a Local Area Network (LAN), where devices are connected to a central access point (imagine it like a star with the central access point in the middle and the devices located at the ends). Be it LAN or wifi, the idea is the same, so when I send a message on Slack, it first arrives at the Slack server (the central access point) and from there it is sent to the recipient.

In mesh networks, devices are directly connected to each other. They form a local network using existing connectivity technologies such as Bluetooth or Wi-Fi as “connectors”. Devices can act as “routers” and forward messages and files to others, enabling the content to hop between them until it reaches a destination. This eliminates the need for a central entity.

Let’s apply this concept to today’s crisis. If slack ran on top of mesh networks, their consumers would still be able to communicate and send files even though they were not connected to the crashed server. Once it was up and running again, all their group conversations which would have taken place during the outrage would be uploaded back to Slack’s server once they were back online.

Honestly, it’s that simple. To Slack, it would not only be convenient for its customers in situations like these (because we would never have Slack crashes), it would also considerably reduce their own infrastructure costs and prevent them from having moments that they might find embarrassing.

So slack, if you see that mesh networks could potentially help you, come talk to us.

HypeLabs https://hypelabs.io

Gamer at Romulex
Review of
Discord

Discord combines the text and image sharing of Skype and Teamspeak 3's high speed voice connection to create this reliable software platform. With the implementation of choosing whether you wish to chat with friends in a 1-on-1 conversation, to joining a community channel and meet up with new people.

Discord provides the opportunity of letting the user join a channel with ease using nothing but a link they can paste into their browser. Discord also gives their members a wider experience being cross-platform, including Windows, Mac, Linux as well as IOS and Android mobile devices.

Discord, on top of all the above, allows the user to post images in both channels and 1-on-1 messaging, aswell as play .gif and .mp4 files.

Implemented also is the custom profile and friend system, allowing the user to add or remove friends, giving the user a vaster experience customizing their own way they wish.

Discord is an overall very well produced platform allowing a diverse experience in communication and multimedia.

Senior Software Engineer
Review of
Slack

Slack is gorgeous and runs on multiple platforms - that's benefit #1. You can easily talk on your iMac then switch to your Android device on the fly.

The one thing I don't really like about it is how it handles multiple organization accounts.

I am a software consultant so I typically work with multiple teams over the months and it's odd to 'log into the right account'. It's not intuitive at all.

I would like there to be a way for users to easily pick a 'Persona' and not accidentally post to the wrong company.

Review of
Slack

Slack filled a very complicated role and did it elegantly.

Its very well designed and easy to use. Adding integrations can be complicated but their documentation with images makes it very easy.

Also I contacted support and get a relevant answer quickly!

All this on the free plan, you better bet we will be upgrading soon.

Product Manager at StackShare
Review of
Slack

Internal Communications made easy

How developers use Discord and Slack
StackShare uses
Slack

I first heard about Slack from my friend Matt (shout out to Final!). He was helping me out with some Rails issues so we started using Slack and I liked it. Specifically, the chat interaction. But also all the integrations. I wasn’t thinking of it as a tool to end all tools at first, just a chat tool with some cool integrations. Then I created a Slack account for StackShare, and that’s when things got real.

Sentry got easier to stay on top of, Heroku was easier to see activity from, discussions were more fluid, and the mobile app was killer. Most of the tools I use either don’t have a mobile app or have shitty ones. Slack is like a replacement for all the mobile apps my tools should have.

I don’t find Slack particularly useful for focused discussions, so I doubt it will replace email anytime soon for us. Things like product discussions/debates are best via email. It forces you to think before you type and have a clear back and forth with someone.

Small gripe: I wish Slack would disable email notifications by default, I still haven’t figured out how to turn those off.

shridhardalavi uses
Slack

Slack is an instant messaging and collaboration system It unifies your entire team communications, making your workflow, well, flow a lot better. It is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services. Slack teams allow communities, groups, or teams to join through a specific URL or invitation sent by a team admin or owner.

SaberEsPoder uses
Slack

Slack is our go-to communication tool and it's slowly replacing emails across all departments of the company. We built our own Slack Bot to help us with simple DevOps stuff; Honeybadger notifies us in real time of errors happening on production in our monitoring channel; CircleCI reports builds status and deployment info as well.

Eldoria uses
Discord

Durch die einfache und plattformübergreifende Nutzung sowie die Möglichkeit schnell rollenbasierte Kanäle zu erstellen, bietet sich Discord hervorragend für die Kommunikation im Team sowie auch mit den Spielern an. Wir nutzen Discord statt Slack, da wir unseren Fokus im Gaming Bereich haben und Discord hier stark vertreten ist.

Mick Dekkers uses
Discord

Discord is home to many game development communities, including AGDG (Amateur Game Development General), RGD (Reddit Game Development), and Game Dev League. When I'm working with WebGL, they are always very knowledgeable and helpful in answering my questions about physics, vectors and data structures.

Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) uses
Discord

We first used slack and switched to Discord later to stay near at where the community is at, while still be able to have private conversations and stay in contact. Discord offered everything we needed and used from Slack previously, plus the community-part, so it was an easy decision.

Andrew Gatenby uses
Slack

Team comms is essential. The R&D team is distributed over two offices, as well as the chance that people are working from home. Slack provides lots of options of keeping individuals and groups up to date. We also use it to integrate into services such as Github and Sentry.

Refractal uses
Slack

Slack is a lifesaver, not only for our day to day team communications and it's direct links into our other tools, but for Beta testing as well, with our custom Slack bot in our beta group being an invaluable asset to avoid giving our testers direct JIRA access.

osu! Ripple uses
Discord

Discord is used for all the discussions with our community, and discussions between our entire staff (including Community Managers, Chat Moderators and BATs). We also use a Discord bot we developed to deploy new code to the server.

ShadowICT uses
Discord

We use Discord for our community as well as generic staff communications. It works as a main selling point for ShadowICT as well as a central place for monitoring alerts and announcements to go.