WordPress logo

WordPress

A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability.
71.7K
18K
+ 1
2K

What is WordPress?

The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family.
WordPress is a tool in the Self-Hosted Blogging / CMS category of a tech stack.
WordPress is an open source tool with 14.5K GitHub stars and 9.1K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to WordPress's open source repository on GitHub

Who uses WordPress?

Companies
48557 companies reportedly use WordPress in their tech stacks, including Hdbest.net, LinkedIn, and Accenture.

Developers
22822 developers on StackShare have stated that they use WordPress.

WordPress Integrations

WooCommerce, Mailgun, Zendesk, AddThis, and Optimizely are some of the popular tools that integrate with WordPress. Here's a list of all 245 tools that integrate with WordPress.
Public Decisions about WordPress

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose WordPress in their tech stack.

Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 754.1K views

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

See more

I'm building a web and mobile application for transferring virtual digital currencies between 3 types of users for real-world applications, not in-game. I've been contacting companies for recommendations and estimates, and two have come back with Laravel and either Flutter or Android Studio/Swift. I've been studying Flutter, and I think that's the way to go, but for the web app and backend, Laravel just doesn't seem right. Maybe, I'm so used to PHP that it looks like a step backward or being stuck in the past or for bloated WordPress sites and text document management. And the components of Laravel, although they look handy, are rather pricey. Looking at similar kinds of apps, I see them being built in AngularJS, TypeScript, Node.js. What do you folks think? Thank You.

See more
Khalid Joharji
Business Developer at Joharji MVPs · | 6 upvotes · 56.8K views
Shared insights
on
WordPress
Webflow
Bubble

So I've been working as a freelancer building websites using Wordpress, limiting myself to available templates and customizing it (drag and drop no code involvement) and blending between plugins to get the requirements as much as possible. and I have spent my day job doing everything related to web portals (business case, business plans, marketing, back-office operations, project management, product management) but never got my hands into code yet. I heard of zero-code solutions such as Bubble and Webflow and I would like to be able to develop an MVP (Minimal Viable Product) to launch those ideas quickly to make sure that I make some sales before we invest into building a state of the art app.

Those MVPs are a struggle since most of it has its own unique processes therefore WordPress doesn't come in handy most of the time. This is where Bubble and Webflow come to the fore. Before I start my journey to learn one of these tools, where I imagine I will spend weeks to months learning, I need to know which road I should take while I am standing at the crossroads.

Objective: 1- Build MVPs with unique workflows to secure sales and transactions to confirm the product is viable

Requirements: 1- No coding knowledge required 2- Drag and drop workflows 3- Can use RTL (right to left) and build websites in Arabic 4- Cost-effective 5- High-quality online courses (free/paid) are available

Your advice is much appreciated.

See more
Tyson Fowler
Senior Analytics Consultant at ArcBlue Consulting · | 6 upvotes · 4.4K views

Currently, we are using WordPress in the organisation to deliver content externally to clients via a portal. However, we have installed way too many plugins for our liking, and they are starting to conflict with one another. Also, there were issues around scalability in the way we initially designed it. A few people in the organisation are leaning toward a Microsoft SharePoint solution using Livetiles, but we've been told it is mainly geared towards internal/intranet solutions as opposed to external solutions (which we provide). I was wondering if anyone has some high-level thoughts to share in regards to moving to a Microsoft Sharepoint environment vs. a more flexible solution like Umbraco.

See more

WordPress's Features

  • Flexibility
  • Publishing Tools
  • User Management
  • Media Management
  • Full Standards Compliance
  • Easy Theme System
  • Extend with Plugins
  • Built-in Comments
  • Search Engine Optimized
  • Multilingual
  • Easy Installation and Upgrades
  • Importers
  • Own Your Data

WordPress Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to WordPress?
Shopify
Shopify powers tens of thousands of online retailers including General Electric, Amnesty International, CrossFit, Tesla Motors, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Foo Fighters, GitHub, and more. Our platform allows users to easily and quickly create their own online store without all the technical work involved in developing their own website, or the huge expense of having someone else build it. Shopify lets merchants manage all aspects of their shops: uploading products, changing the design, accepting credit card orders, and viewing their incoming orders and completed transactions.
Joomla!
Joomla is a simple and powerful web server application and it requires a server with PHP and either MySQL, PostgreSQL, or SQL Server to run it.
Wix
Creating your stunning website for free is easier than ever. No tech skills needed. Just pick a template, change anything you want, add your images, videos, text and more to get online instantly.
Squarespace
Whether you need simple pages, sophisticated galleries, a professional blog, or want to sell online, it all comes standard with your Squarespace website. Squarespace starts you with beautiful designs right out of the box — each handcrafted by our award-winning design team to make your content stand out.
Drupal
Drupal is an open source content management platform powering millions of websites and applications. It’s built, used, and supported by an active and diverse community of people around the world.
See all alternatives

WordPress's Followers
17977 developers follow WordPress to keep up with related blogs and decisions.