Alternatives to UIkIt logo

Alternatives to UIkIt

Bootstrap, Semantic UI, Bulma, Angular Material , and SwiftUI are the most popular alternatives and competitors to UIkIt.
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What is UIkIt and what are its top alternatives?

UIkit is a lightweight and modular front-end framework that allows users to create fast and responsive websites with ease. It provides a comprehensive set of components and utilities for building web interfaces without the need for extensive customization. However, some limitations of UIkit include a smaller community compared to other popular frameworks and limited customization options for advanced users.

  1. Bootstrap: Bootstrap is a widely-used front-end framework that offers a vast array of components and utilities for building responsive websites. Its key features include a large community for support, extensive documentation, and flexibility in customization. Pros include a wide range of pre-built components, while cons involve its relatively larger file size compared to UIkit.

  2. Foundation: Foundation is another scalable front-end framework that provides a range of customizable components for web development. Its key features include a grid system for layout design, responsive design elements, and a growing community for support. Pros include its flexibility in customization, while cons involve a steeper learning curve for beginners.

  3. Semantic UI: Semantic UI is a design framework that focuses on human-friendly HTML, making it easier for developers to create intuitive and interactive websites. Its key features include a simple syntax, responsive design elements, and a variety of pre-built themes. Pros include its intuitive design language, while cons involve limited community support compared to other frameworks.

  4. Materialize: Materialize is a modern responsive front-end framework based on Google's Material Design principles. Its key features include a grid system, responsive design elements, and pre-built CSS and JavaScript components. Pros include its clean and aesthetic design, while cons involve a smaller community compared to more established frameworks.

  5. Bulma: Bulma is a modern CSS framework based on Flexbox that offers a variety of responsive design components for building websites. Its key features include a modular structure, easy customization, and a lightweight file size. Pros include its simplicity and ease of use, while cons involve a limited number of pre-built components compared to other frameworks.

  6. Tailwind CSS: Tailwind CSS is a utility-first CSS framework that provides a set of low-level utility classes for rapidly building custom designs. Its key features include a customizable design system, responsive utilities, and streamlined development workflow. Pros include its flexibility in creating unique designs, while cons involve a steeper learning curve for beginners.

  7. Ant Design: Ant Design is a design framework with a set of high-quality components and patterns based on the Ant Design language. Its key features include a comprehensive UI library, responsive design elements, and detailed documentation. Pros include its polished design language, while cons involve a more limited range of customization compared to other frameworks.

  8. Spectre.css: Spectre.css is a lightweight and responsive CSS framework that offers a modular set of components for building modern web interfaces. Its key features include a minimalistic design approach, responsive utilities, and a focus on performance. Pros include its simplicity and performance optimization, while cons involve a smaller community compared to more popular frameworks.

  9. Semantic UI Vue: Semantic UI Vue is a Vue.js implementation of the Semantic UI framework, offering native Vue components based on the Semantic design language. Its key features include seamless integration with Vue.js, responsive design elements, and a wide range of pre-built components. Pros include its compatibility with Vue.js projects, while cons involve potential compatibility issues with other JavaScript frameworks.

  10. UIKit 3: Updated version of UIkit with improved features. Pros include enhanced components and utilities, while cons involve the learning curve for transitioning from earlier versions.

Top Alternatives to UIkIt

  • Bootstrap
    Bootstrap

    Bootstrap is the most popular HTML, CSS, and JS framework for developing responsive, mobile first projects on the web. ...

  • Semantic UI
    Semantic UI

    Semantic empowers designers and developers by creating a shared vocabulary for UI. ...

  • Bulma
    Bulma

    Bulma is a CSS framework based on Flexbox and built with Sass

  • Angular Material
    Angular Material

    Sprint from Zero to App. Hit the ground running with comprehensive, modern UI components that work across the web, mobile and desktop. It allows to create material styled angular apps fast and easy. ...

  • SwiftUI
    SwiftUI

    Provides views, controls, and layout structures for declaring your app's user interface. The framework provides event handlers for delivering taps, gestures, and other types of input to your app. ...

  • Foundation
    Foundation

    Foundation is the most advanced responsive front-end framework in the world. You can quickly prototype and build sites or apps that work on any kind of device with Foundation, which includes layout constructs (like a fully responsive grid), elements and best practices. ...

  • Cocoa (OS X)
    Cocoa (OS X)

    Much of Cocoa is implemented in Objective-C, an object-oriented language that is compiled to run at incredible speed, yet employs a truly dynamic runtime making it uniquely flexible. Because Objective-C is a superset of C, it is easy to mix C and even C++ into your Cocoa applications. ...

  • React
    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

UIkIt alternatives & related posts

Bootstrap logo

Bootstrap

55.4K
13.1K
7.7K
Simple and flexible HTML, CSS, and JS for popular UI components and interactions
55.4K
13.1K
+ 1
7.7K
PROS OF BOOTSTRAP
  • 1.6K
    Responsiveness
  • 1.2K
    UI components
  • 943
    Consistent
  • 779
    Great docs
  • 677
    Flexible
  • 472
    HTML, CSS, and JS framework
  • 411
    Open source
  • 375
    Widely used
  • 368
    Customizable
  • 242
    HTML framework
  • 77
    Easy setup
  • 77
    Popular
  • 77
    Mobile first
  • 57
    Great grid system
  • 52
    Great community
  • 38
    Future compatibility
  • 34
    Integration
  • 28
    Very powerful foundational front-end framework
  • 24
    Standard
  • 23
    Javascript plugins
  • 19
    Build faster prototypes
  • 18
    Preprocessors
  • 14
    Grids
  • 9
    Good for a person who hates CSS
  • 8
    Clean
  • 4
    Easy to setup and learn
  • 4
    Love it
  • 4
    Rapid development
  • 3
    Great and easy to use
  • 2
    Easy to use
  • 2
    Devin schumacher rules
  • 2
    Boostrap
  • 2
    Community
  • 2
    Provide angular wrapper
  • 2
    Great and easy
  • 2
    Powerful grid system, Rapid development, Customization
  • 2
    Great customer support
  • 2
    Popularity
  • 2
    Clean and quick frontend development
  • 2
    Great and easy to make a responsive website
  • 2
    Sprzedam opla
  • 1
    Painless front end development
  • 1
    Love the classes?
  • 1
    Responsive design
  • 1
    Poop
  • 1
    So clean and simple
  • 1
    Design Agnostic
  • 1
    Numerous components
  • 1
    Material-ui
  • 1
    Recognizable
  • 1
    Intuitive
  • 1
    Vue
  • 1
    Felxible, comfortable, user-friendly
  • 1
    Pre-Defined components
  • 1
    It's fast
  • 1
    Geo
  • 1
    Not tied to jQuery
  • 1
    The fame
  • 1
    Easy setup2
CONS OF BOOTSTRAP
  • 26
    Javascript is tied to jquery
  • 16
    Every site uses the defaults
  • 15
    Grid system break points aren't ideal
  • 14
    Too much heavy decoration in default look
  • 8
    Verbose styles
  • 1
    Super heavy

related Bootstrap posts

Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Technical Lead · | 19 upvotes · 4.9M views

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

See more
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 13 upvotes · 1.6M views

For Etom, a side project. We wanted to test an idea for a future and bigger project.

What Etom does is searching places. Right now, it leverages the Google Maps API. For that, we found a React component that makes this integration easy because using Google Maps API is not possible via normal API requests.

You kind of need a map to work as a proxy between the software and Google Maps API.

We hate configuration(coming from Rails world) so also decided to use Create React App because setting up a React app, with all the toys, it's a hard job.

Thanks to all the people behind Create React App it's easier to start any React application.

We also chose a module called Reactstrap which is Bootstrap UI in React components.

An important thing in this side project(and in the bigger project plan) is to measure visitor through out the app. For that we researched and found that Keen was a good choice(very good free tier limits) and also it is very simple to setup and real simple to send data to

Slack and Trello are our defaults tools to comunicate ideas and discuss topics, so, no brainer using them as well for this project.

See more
Semantic UI logo

Semantic UI

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673
A UI Component library implemented using a set of specifications designed around natural language
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PROS OF SEMANTIC UI
  • 157
    Easy to use and looks elegant
  • 92
    Variety of components
  • 64
    Themes
  • 61
    Has out-of-the-box widgets i would actually use
  • 57
    Semantic, duh
  • 44
    Its the future
  • 42
    Open source
  • 37
    Very active development
  • 31
    Far less complicated structure
  • 28
    Gulp
  • 9
    Already has more features than bootstrap
  • 8
    Just compare it to Bootstrap and you'll be hooked
  • 7
    Clean and consistent markup model
  • 7
    UI components
  • 6
    Responsiveness
  • 4
    Because it is semantic :-D
  • 4
    Elegant. clean. readable. maintainable
  • 4
    Good-Looking
  • 2
    Is big and look really great, nothing like this
  • 2
    Consistent
  • 2
    Great docs
  • 2
    Modular and scalable
  • 1
    Easy to use
  • 1
    Blends with reactjs
  • 1
    Jquery
CONS OF SEMANTIC UI
  • 5
    Outdated build tool (gulp 3))
  • 3
    Poor accessibility support
  • 3
    HTML is not semantic (see list component)
  • 2
    Javascript is tied to jquery

related Semantic UI posts

ReactQL is a React + GraphQL front-end starter kit. #JSX is a natural way to think about building UI, and it renders to pure #HTML in the browser and on the server, making it trivial to build server-rendered Single Page Apps. GraphQL via Apollo was chosen for the data layer; #GraphQL makes it simple to request just the data your app needs, and #Apollo takes care of communicating with your API (written in any language; doesn't have to be JavaScript!), caching, and rendering to #React.

ReactQL is written in TypeScript to provide full types/Intellisense, and pick up hard-to-diagnose goofs that might later show up at runtime. React makes heavy use of Webpack 4 to handle transforming your code to an optimised client-side bundle, and in throws back just enough code needed for the initial render, while seamlessly handling import statements asynchronously as needed, making the payload your user downloads ultimately much smaller than trying to do it by hand.

React Helmet was chosen to handle <head> content, because it works universally, making it easy to throw back the correct <title> and other tags on the initial render, as well as inject new tags for subsequent client-side views.

styled-components, Sass, Less and PostCSS were added to give developers a choice of whether to build styles purely in React / JavaScript, or whether to defer to a #css #preprocessor. This is especially useful for interop with UI frameworks like Bootstrap, Semantic UI, Foundation, etc - ReactQL lets you mix and match #css and renders to both a static .css file during bundling as well as generates per-page <style> tags when using #StyledComponents.

React Router handles routing, because it works both on the server and in the client. ReactQL customises it further by capturing non-200 responses on the server, redirecting or throwing back custom 404 pages as needed.

Koa is the web server that handles all incoming HTTP requests, because it's fast (TTFB < 5ms, even after fully rendering React), and its natively #async, making it easy to async/await inside routes and middleware.

See more
Hassan Mugabo
Software Developer at Codeparl Digital Services · | 3 upvotes · 71.6K views

Hi, I'm using Tailwind CSS for my project but I found Bootstrap and Semantic UI offering pre-built components like Model, Sidebars, and so forth. Is it possible to use Semantic UI or Bootstrap under Tailwind CSS?

See more
Bulma logo

Bulma

755
855
38
Free, open source, & modern CSS framework based on Flexbox
755
855
+ 1
38
PROS OF BULMA
  • 12
    Easy setup
  • 6
    Easy-to-customize the sass build
  • 6
    Community-created themes
  • 5
    Responsive
  • 5
    Great docs
  • 4
    Easy to learn and use
CONS OF BULMA
  • 2
    Not yet supporting Vue 3

related Bulma posts

CDG

I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

See more
Daniel Hernández Alcojor
Frontend Developer at atSistemas · | 8 upvotes · 1M views

I'm building, from scratch, a webapp. It's going to be a dashboard to check on our apps in New Relic and update the Apdex from the webapp. I have just chosen Next.js as our framework because we use React already, and after going through the tutorial, I just loved the latest changes they have implemented.

But we have to decide on a CSS framework for the UI. I'm partial to Bulma because I love that it's all about CSS (and you can use SCSS from the start), that it's rather lightweight and that it doesn't come with JavaScript clutter. One of the things I hate about Bootstrap is that you depend on jQuery to use the JavaScript part. My boss loves UIkIt, but when I've used it in the past, I didn't like it.

What do you think we should use? Maybe you have another suggestion?

See more
Angular Material  logo

Angular Material

621
752
32
Easy to use material design for angular
621
752
+ 1
32
PROS OF ANGULAR MATERIAL
  • 12
    Components
  • 8
    Backed by a well known company
  • 4
    Simple
  • 3
    Easy
  • 2
    Very good documentation
  • 2
    Rte
  • 1
    Implements well known material design
CONS OF ANGULAR MATERIAL
  • 4
    Fairly large
  • 2
    Look like 90s stuffs
  • 2
    Suck
  • 2
    Shit

related Angular Material posts

I am a novice to AngularJS, but I have a strong web development background. I need help with the pros and cons of choosing the Angular Material or PrimeNg for our new application. Our new application will be using Angular for the front-end and .NET Core for the Web API. I looked at both tools and leaned toward Angular Material. It would be beneficial if I could obtain some expert advice from the community.

See more
Babak Khademi
Frontend Developer at Freelance · | 2 upvotes · 182.2K views

What is the best and fastest developing UI CSS Framework to couple with Angular Material ? Mostly for making responsive components and writing less sass. I have Bootstrap and Tailwind CSS in mind.

See more
SwiftUI logo

SwiftUI

553
529
6
Build user interfaces across all Apple platforms with Swift
553
529
+ 1
6
PROS OF SWIFTUI
  • 2
    XCode Canvas feature
  • 2
    Live previews
  • 2
    Smaller Scalable views
CONS OF SWIFTUI
    Be the first to leave a con

    related SwiftUI posts

    Greetings everyone. I ran a design studio for 8 years in which we designed mobile and web apps. I also lead development teams when our client asked us to carry out the development of the projects. I always had an interest in learning to code to help me understand what is going on on the dev side and also build small apps as a hobby. I tried several times to get on a learning path, but challenges always put me down, so I quit after a couple of weeks. I tried JavaScript, Python, PHP, and Objective-C.

    Now I am retrying to teach myself Swift and especially SwiftUI for more than a month, and It's been going well so far. I want to build my own small apps, and I'm not focused on getting hired as a developer. I want to ask if it's the right language to start learning to program or should I learn something else first as a foundation. I'm currently taking a 100 days of code challenge and reading the Swift 5.3 PDF if I want to get more information on a specific topic. It feels like none of the stuff is sticking, but I'm not sure if it's the way it goes or my approach is wrong.

    I would appreciate any kind of guidance. Thanks

    See more

    I have been using Firebase with almost all my web projects as well as SwiftUI projects. I use it for the database as well as the user authentication via Google.

    Is it good enough?? I have learned MySQL but I'm not that comfortable…

    So for user authentication and database should I keep using firebase or switch to MySQL or MongoDB?? Or any other combination?

    See more
    Foundation logo

    Foundation

    1.2K
    1.2K
    740
    The most advanced responsive front-end framework in the world
    1.2K
    1.2K
    + 1
    740
    PROS OF FOUNDATION
    • 160
      Responsive grid
    • 93
      Mobile first
    • 80
      Open source
    • 75
      Semantic
    • 72
      Customizable
    • 52
      Quick to prototype
    • 50
      Simple ui
    • 45
      Fast
    • 44
      Best practices
    • 39
      Easy setup
    • 6
      Neutral style
    • 6
      HTML, SCSS and JS
    • 5
      Accessibility support
    • 5
      Professional
    • 3
      Xy grid
    • 2
      Sass
    • 2
      Every new version is smaller, smarter & more efficient
    • 1
      Robust
    CONS OF FOUNDATION
    • 5
      Requires jQuery
    • 4
      Awful site

    related Foundation posts

    ReactQL is a React + GraphQL front-end starter kit. #JSX is a natural way to think about building UI, and it renders to pure #HTML in the browser and on the server, making it trivial to build server-rendered Single Page Apps. GraphQL via Apollo was chosen for the data layer; #GraphQL makes it simple to request just the data your app needs, and #Apollo takes care of communicating with your API (written in any language; doesn't have to be JavaScript!), caching, and rendering to #React.

    ReactQL is written in TypeScript to provide full types/Intellisense, and pick up hard-to-diagnose goofs that might later show up at runtime. React makes heavy use of Webpack 4 to handle transforming your code to an optimised client-side bundle, and in throws back just enough code needed for the initial render, while seamlessly handling import statements asynchronously as needed, making the payload your user downloads ultimately much smaller than trying to do it by hand.

    React Helmet was chosen to handle <head> content, because it works universally, making it easy to throw back the correct <title> and other tags on the initial render, as well as inject new tags for subsequent client-side views.

    styled-components, Sass, Less and PostCSS were added to give developers a choice of whether to build styles purely in React / JavaScript, or whether to defer to a #css #preprocessor. This is especially useful for interop with UI frameworks like Bootstrap, Semantic UI, Foundation, etc - ReactQL lets you mix and match #css and renders to both a static .css file during bundling as well as generates per-page <style> tags when using #StyledComponents.

    React Router handles routing, because it works both on the server and in the client. ReactQL customises it further by capturing non-200 responses on the server, redirecting or throwing back custom 404 pages as needed.

    Koa is the web server that handles all incoming HTTP requests, because it's fast (TTFB < 5ms, even after fully rendering React), and its natively #async, making it easy to async/await inside routes and middleware.

    See more
    Shared insights
    on
    BootstrapBootstrapFoundationFoundation

    Should I go with Foundation CSS instead of Bootstrap? Or, if any other popular responsive frameworks are out there, please suggest them to me. My site mainly targets mobile or tablet

    See more
    Cocoa (OS X) logo

    Cocoa (OS X)

    37
    52
    6
    The Cocoa frameworks consist of libraries, APIs, and runtimes that form the development layer for all of OS...
    37
    52
    + 1
    6
    PROS OF COCOA (OS X)
    • 3
      Great community
    • 2
      IOS
    • 1
      Backed by apple
    CONS OF COCOA (OS X)
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Cocoa (OS X) posts

      React logo

      React

      170.4K
      140.7K
      4.1K
      A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
      170.4K
      140.7K
      + 1
      4.1K
      PROS OF REACT
      • 830
        Components
      • 672
        Virtual dom
      • 578
        Performance
      • 508
        Simplicity
      • 442
        Composable
      • 186
        Data flow
      • 166
        Declarative
      • 128
        Isn't an mvc framework
      • 120
        Reactive updates
      • 115
        Explicit app state
      • 50
        JSX
      • 29
        Learn once, write everywhere
      • 22
        Easy to Use
      • 21
        Uni-directional data flow
      • 17
        Works great with Flux Architecture
      • 11
        Great perfomance
      • 10
        Javascript
      • 9
        Built by Facebook
      • 8
        TypeScript support
      • 6
        Speed
      • 6
        Server Side Rendering
      • 5
        Feels like the 90s
      • 5
        Excellent Documentation
      • 5
        Props
      • 5
        Functional
      • 5
        Easy as Lego
      • 5
        Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
      • 5
        Cross-platform
      • 5
        Easy to start
      • 5
        Hooks
      • 5
        Awesome
      • 5
        Scalable
      • 4
        Super easy
      • 4
        Allows creating single page applications
      • 4
        Server side views
      • 4
        Sdfsdfsdf
      • 4
        Start simple
      • 4
        Strong Community
      • 4
        Fancy third party tools
      • 4
        Scales super well
      • 3
        Has arrow functions
      • 3
        Beautiful and Neat Component Management
      • 3
        Just the View of MVC
      • 3
        Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
      • 3
        Fast evolving
      • 3
        SSR
      • 3
        Great migration pathway for older systems
      • 3
        Rich ecosystem
      • 3
        Simple
      • 3
        Has functional components
      • 3
        Every decision architecture wise makes sense
      • 3
        Very gentle learning curve
      • 2
        Split your UI into components with one true state
      • 2
        Recharts
      • 2
        Permissively-licensed
      • 2
        Fragments
      • 2
        Sharable
      • 2
        Image upload
      • 2
        HTML-like
      • 1
        React hooks
      • 1
        Datatables
      CONS OF REACT
      • 41
        Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
      • 30
        No predefined way to structure your app
      • 29
        Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
      • 13
        JSX
      • 10
        Not enterprise friendly
      • 6
        One-way binding only
      • 3
        State consistency with backend neglected
      • 3
        Bad Documentation
      • 2
        Error boundary is needed
      • 2
        Paradigms change too fast

      related React posts

      Johnny Bell

      I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

      I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

      I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

      Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

      Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

      With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

      If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

      See more
      Zach Holman

      Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

      But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

      But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

      Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

      See more