Alternatives to TypeORM logo

Alternatives to TypeORM

Sequelize, Mongoose, LoopBack, Prisma, and MikroORM are the most popular alternatives and competitors to TypeORM.
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What is TypeORM and what are its top alternatives?

It supports both Active Record and Data Mapper patterns, unlike all other JavaScript ORMs currently in existence, which means you can write high quality, loosely coupled, scalable, maintainable applications the most productive way.
TypeORM is a tool in the Microframeworks (Backend) category of a tech stack.
TypeORM is an open source tool with 26.8K GitHub stars and 4.9K GitHub forks. Here鈥檚 a link to TypeORM's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to TypeORM

  • Sequelize

    Sequelize

    Sequelize is a promise-based ORM for Node.js and io.js. It supports the dialects PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, SQLite and MSSQL and features solid transaction support, relations, read replication and more. ...

  • Mongoose

    Mongoose

    Let's face it, writing MongoDB validation, casting and business logic boilerplate is a drag. That's why we wrote Mongoose. Mongoose provides a straight-forward, schema-based solution to modeling your application data and includes built-in type casting, validation, query building, business logic hooks and more, out of the box. ...

  • LoopBack

    LoopBack

    A highly-extensible, open-source Node.js framework that enables you to create dynamic end-to-end REST APIs with little or no coding. Connect to multiple data sources, write business logic in Node.js, glue on top of your existing services and data, connect using JS, iOS & Android SDKs. ...

  • Prisma

    Prisma

    Prisma is an open-source database toolkit. It replaces traditional ORMs and makes database access easy with an auto-generated query builder for TypeScript & Node.js. ...

  • MikroORM

    MikroORM

    TypeScript ORM for Node.js based on Data Mapper, Unit of Work and Identity Map patterns. Supports MongoDB, MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL and SQLite databases. ...

  • Entity Framework

    Entity Framework

    It is an object-relational mapper that enables .NET developers to work with relational data using domain-specific objects. It eliminates the need for most of the data-access code that developers usually need to write. ...

  • GraphQL

    GraphQL

    GraphQL is a data query language and runtime designed and used at Facebook to request and deliver data to mobile and web apps since 2012. ...

  • ExpressJS

    ExpressJS

    Express is a minimal and flexible node.js web application framework, providing a robust set of features for building single and multi-page, and hybrid web applications. ...

TypeORM alternatives & related posts

Sequelize logo

Sequelize

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1.1K
109
Easy-to-use multi SQL dialect ORM for Node.js
598
1.1K
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109
PROS OF SEQUELIZE
  • 33
    Good ORM for node.js
  • 25
    Easy setup
  • 15
    Support MySQL & MariaDB, PostgreSQL, MSSQL, Sqlite
  • 12
    Open source
  • 11
    Free
  • 8
    Promise Based
  • 2
    Recommend for mongoose users
  • 2
    Atrocious documentation, buggy, issues closed by bots
  • 1
    Typescript
CONS OF SEQUELIZE
  • 27
    Docs are awful
  • 5
    Relations can be confusing

related Sequelize posts

Dieudonn茅 ALLOGNON
Junior Fullstack Developer | 5 upvotes 路 72.1K views

Hey! I am actually in internship and have an app to create for my structure. It will be an intern app which will allow crud dashboard actions with some data provided by the use of an API of one of the structure partner and make a correspondence to data contained in a private database. Since it's an intern app, I thought about Electron for a desktop app because I did a lot of web with Laravel and the structure goes more for the desktop app. But it will be my first occasion working with this tech.

Is Electron a good choice? Wich ORM should be more complete and adapted to this between Sequelize and TypeORM? (Database will be MySQL) Some charts will be displayed in the app. Is there a library (preferably without jQuery) that suits this stack?

Thank you !

See more

What is the best way to increase your income as a freelancer in 2019? What frameworks should be the best to learn? React Node.js Docker Kubernetes Sequelize Mongoose MongoDB ExpressJS hapi Based on trends I've picked up a JS full stack. If you need to work under startups you may replace React with Vue.js . If you want to work in outsourcing Angular 2+ may be better.

What is your opinion?

See more
Mongoose logo

Mongoose

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1.2K
54
MongoDB object modeling designed to work in an asynchronous environment
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1.2K
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PROS OF MONGOOSE
  • 17
    Well documented
  • 15
    Several bad ideas mixed together
  • 10
    JSON
  • 8
    Actually terrible documentation
  • 2
    Recommended and used by Valve. See steamworks docs
  • 1
    Can be used with passportjs for oauth
  • 1
    Yeah
CONS OF MONGOOSE
  • 3
    Model middleware/hooks are not user friendly

related Mongoose posts

Repost

Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

See more

Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku. However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

See more
LoopBack logo

LoopBack

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Build modern API applications that require complex integrations
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+ 1
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PROS OF LOOPBACK
  • 9
    Need a nodejs ReST-API, DB, AAA, Swagger? Then loopback
  • 8
    Easy Database Migration
  • 5
    Code generator
  • 3
    The future of API's
  • 2
    GraphQL
  • 0
    Typescript
CONS OF LOOPBACK
  • 7
    Community is slow
  • 1
    Backward compatibility

related LoopBack posts

Samuel Olugbemi
Software Engineer at Payzone UK | 6 upvotes 路 122.1K views
Shared insights
on
LoopBackLoopBackExpressJSExpressJS
at

I use LoopBack because it is: * It is truly and Unbelievably Extensible * it is default integrated with OpenAPI (Swagger) Spec Driven REST API * I write lesser codes, because most of the user stories have been covered using the code generation * It's documentation is more compact and well detailed than ExpressJS * It is very easy to learn, hence you can build a basic Rest API App in minutes * It has built in NPM packages required to build my Rest API which saves me time on installation and configuration * The Datasource/Service/Controller concept is just Brilliant (that's mostly all you need to get your app speaking with an External API services) * The support for SOAP and Rest API services is amazing!

See more
Shared insights
on
NestJSNestJSJestJestLoopBackLoopBack

We inherited this project and the backend is using LoopBack v3. I haven't taken a look at Loopback.io v4, but I'm planning to replace it. The reason being is that Loopback v3 documentation is a bit confusing and we are having trouble packaging the build using Webpack. Not to mention, integrating unit tests (latest Jest).

I still think Loopback is a great tool, but their documentation is really "messy" and hard to navigate through. There's also a constraint of time from our side. So what's the best option out there?

Should I try upgrading to Loopback v4, or trying other stuff? (i.e. NestJS)

Thanks!

See more
Prisma logo

Prisma

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578
47
Modern Database Access for TypeScript & Node.js
387
578
+ 1
47
PROS OF PRISMA
  • 10
    Type-safe database access
  • 9
    Open Source
  • 8
    Auto-generated query builder
  • 6
    Increases confidence during development
  • 5
    Supports multible database systems
  • 4
    Built specifically for Postgres and TypeScript
  • 4
    Productive application development
  • 1
    Supports multible RDBMSs
  • 0
    Robust migrations system
CONS OF PRISMA
  • 1
    Doesn't support downward/back migrations

related Prisma posts

Divine Bawa
at PayHub Ghana Limited | 16 upvotes 路 306.6K views

I just finished a web app meant for a business that offers training programs for certain professional courses. I chose this stack to test out my skills in graphql and react. I used Node.js , GraphQL , MySQL for the #Backend utilizing Prisma as a database interface for MySQL to provide CRUD APIs and graphql-yoga as a server. For the #frontend I chose React, styled-components for styling, Next.js for routing and SSR and Apollo for data management. I really liked the outcome and I will definitely use this stack in future projects.

See more
Munkhtegsh Munkhbat
Software Engineer Consultant at LoanSnap | 9 upvotes 路 138K views

In my last side project, I built a web posting application that has similar features as Facebook and hosted on Heroku. The user can register an account, create posts, upload images and share with others. I took an advantage of graphql-subscriptions to handle realtime notifications in the comments section. Currently, I'm at the last stage of styling and building layouts.

For the #Backend I used graphql-yoga, Prisma, GraphQL with PostgreSQL database. For the #FrontEnd: React, styled-components with Apollo. The app is hosted on Heroku.

See more
MikroORM logo

MikroORM

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TypeScript ORM for Node.js based on Data Mapper, Unit of Work and Identity Map patterns
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PROS OF MIKROORM
  • 2
    Supports both SQL and NoSQL
  • 2
    Typescript
  • 2
    DRY Entities
  • 2
    Allows multiple ways to define entities
  • 1
    EntityGenerator to reverse engineer existing database
  • 1
    SQL layer built on top of Knex
  • 1
    Powered by Unit of Work and Identity Map
  • 1
    Implicit Transactions
CONS OF MIKROORM
    Be the first to leave a con

    related MikroORM posts

    Entity Framework logo

    Entity Framework

    225
    140
    8
    An object-relational mapper that enables .NET developers to work with relational data
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    140
    + 1
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    PROS OF ENTITY FRAMEWORK
    • 1
      LINQ
    • 1
      Multiple approach (Model/Database/Code) first
    • 1
      Strongly Object-Oriented
    • 1
      Code first approach
    • 1
      Object Oriented
    • 1
      Model first approach
    • 1
      Auto generated code
    • 1
      Strongly typed entities
    • 0
      Database first
    CONS OF ENTITY FRAMEWORK
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Entity Framework posts

      GraphQL logo

      GraphQL

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      A data query language and runtime
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      PROS OF GRAPHQL
      • 70
        Schemas defined by the requests made by the user
      • 62
        Will replace RESTful interfaces
      • 59
        The future of API's
      • 47
        The future of databases
      • 12
        Self-documenting
      • 11
        Get many resources in a single request
      • 5
        Ask for what you need, get exactly that
      • 4
        Query Language
      • 3
        Type system
      • 3
        Evolve your API without versions
      • 3
        Fetch different resources in one request
      • 2
        Ease of client creation
      • 2
        Easy setup
      • 2
        GraphiQL
      • 1
        Good for apps that query at build time. (SSR/Gatsby)
      • 1
        Backed by Facebook
      • 1
        Easy to learn
      • 1
        "Open" document
      • 1
        Better versioning
      • 1
        Standard
      • 1
        1. Describe your data
      • 1
        Fast prototyping
      CONS OF GRAPHQL
      • 3
        Hard to migrate from GraphQL to another technology
      • 3
        More code to type.
      • 1
        Works just like any other API at runtime
      • 1
        Takes longer to build compared to schemaless.

      related GraphQL posts

      Shared insights
      on
      Node.jsNode.jsGraphQLGraphQLMongoDBMongoDB

      I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

      For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

      1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

      2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

      3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

      See more
      Nick Rockwell
      SVP, Engineering at Fastly | 44 upvotes 路 1.8M views

      When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

      So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

      React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

      Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

      See more
      ExpressJS logo

      ExpressJS

      20.7K
      16.7K
      1.5K
      Sinatra inspired web development framework for node.js -- insanely fast, flexible, and simple
      20.7K
      16.7K
      + 1
      1.5K
      PROS OF EXPRESSJS
      • 368
        Simple
      • 323
        Node.js
      • 235
        Javascript
      • 186
        High performance
      • 148
        Robust routing
      • 67
        Middlewares
      • 66
        Open source
      • 53
        Great community
      • 34
        Hybrid web applications
      • 10
        Well documented
      • 8
        Sinatra inspired
      • 5
        Isomorphic js.. superfast and easy
      • 4
        Rapid development
      • 2
        Npm
      • 2
        Resource available for learning
      • 2
        Socket connection
      • 2
        Xxx
      • 2
        Light weight
      • 2
        Event loop
      • 1
        Data stream
      • 1
        Callbacks
      CONS OF EXPRESSJS
      • 24
        Not python
      • 16
        Overrated
      • 14
        No multithreading
      • 6
        Javascript
      • 5
        Not fast
      • 2
        Easily Insecure for Novices
      • 1
        Nnnn
      • 1
        Not a lion

      related ExpressJS posts

      Simon Reymann
      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH | 25 upvotes 路 2.2M views

      Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

      • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
      • npm as package manager
      • NestJS as Node.js framework
      • TypeScript as programming language
      • ExpressJS as web server
      • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API鈥檚 resources
      • Postman as a tool for API development
      • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
      • JSON Web Token for access token management

      The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

      • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
      • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
      • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
      • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
      See more

      Repost

      Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

      Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

      Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

      Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

      See more