MariaDB vs MongoDB vs MySQL

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MariaDB

10K
7.4K
+ 1
467
MongoDB

56.6K
46.3K
+ 1
4.1K
MySQL

75.5K
59.8K
+ 1
3.7K
Advice on MariaDB, MongoDB, and MySQL
Ilias Mentzelos
Software Engineer at Plum Fintech · | 8 upvotes · 17.2K views
Needs advice
on
MongoDB
and
Couchbase

Hey, we want to build a referral campaign mechanism that will probably contain millions of records within the next few years. We want fast read access based on IDs or some indexes, and isolation is crucial as some listeners will try to update the same document at the same time. What's your suggestion between Couchbase and MongoDB? Thanks!

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Replies (2)
Jon Clarke
Enterprise Account Exec at ScyllaDB · | 3 upvotes · 11.1K views
Recommends
Scylla
Couchbase

I am biased (work for Scylla) but it sounds like a KV/wide column would be better in this use case. Document/schema free/lite DBs data stores are easier to get up and running on but are not as scalable (generally) as NoSQL flavors that require a more rigid data model like ScyllaDB. If your data volumes are going to be 10s of TB and transactions per sec 10s of 1000s (or more), look at Scylla. We have something called lightweight transactions (LWT) that can get you consistency.

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Recommends
MongoDB

I have found MongoDB highly consistent and highly available. It suits your needs. We usually trade off partion tolerance fot this. Having said that, I am little biased in recommendation as I haven't had much experience with couchbase on production.

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Needs advice
on
PostgreSQL
MySQL
and
MongoDB

I'm planning to build a freelance marketplace website, using tools like Next.js, Firebase Authentication, Node.js, but I need to know which type of database is suitable with performance and powerful features. I'm trying to figure out what the best stack is for this project. If anyone has advice please, I’d love to hear more details. Thanks.

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Replies (3)
malekmfs
at Meam Software Engineering Group · | 6 upvotes · 24.2K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

Postgres and MySQL are very similar, but Mongo has differences in terms of storage type and the CAP theorem. For your requirement, I prefer Postgres (or MySQL) over MongoDB. Mongo gives you no schema which is not always good. on the other hand, it is more common in NodeJS community, so you may find more articles about Node-Mongo stuff. I suggest to stay with RDBMS if possible.

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Ruslan Rayanov
Recommends
MySQL

We have a ready-made engine for the online exchange and marketplace. To customize it, you only need to know sql. Connecting any database is not a problem. https://falconspace.site/list/solutions

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Recommends
PostgreSQL
MySQL

This is a little about experience. Postgresql is fine. You can use either the related table structure or the json table structure.

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Dennis Kraaijeveld
Needs advice
on
PostgreSQL
MongoDB
and
ExpressJS

For learning purposes, I am trying to design a dashboard that displays the total revenue from all connected webshops/marketplaces, displaying incoming orders, total orders, etc.

So I will need to get the data (using Node backend) from the Shopify and marketplace APIs, storing this in the database, and get the data from the back end.

My question is:

What kind of database should I use? Is MongoDB fine for storing this kind of data? Or should I go with a SQL database?

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Replies (3)
Arash JalaliGhalibaf
Software Engineer at Cafe Bazaar · | 10 upvotes · 36K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

Postgres is a solid database with a promising background. In the relational side of database design, I see Postgres as an absolute; Now the arguments and conflicts come in when talking about NoSQL data types. The truth is jsonb in Postgres is efficient and gives a good performance and storage. In a comparison with MongoDB with the same resources (such as RAM and CPU) with better tools and community, I think you should go for Postgres and use jsonb for some of the data. All in all, don't use a NoSQL database just cause you have the data type matching this tech, have both SQL and NoSQL at the same time.

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Recommends
MongoDB

I have found MongoDB easier to work with. Postgres and SQL in general, in my experience, is harder to work with. While Postgres does provide data consistency, MongoDB provides flexibility. I've found the MongoDB ecosystem to be really great with a good community. I've worked with MongoDB in production and it's been great. I really like the aggregation system and using query operators such as $in, $pull, $push.

While my opinion may be unpopular, I have found MongoDB really great for relational data, using aggregations from a code perspective. In general, data types are also more flexible with MongoDB.

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Luciano Bustos
Senior Software Developer · | 1 upvotes · 26.6K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

I will use PostgreSQL because you have more powerfull feature for data agregation and views (the raw data from shopify and others could be stored as is) and then use views to produce diff. kind of reports unless you wanna create those aggregations/views in nodejs code. HTH

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Decisions about MariaDB, MongoDB, and MySQL
Usman Sadiq
Student at University of Toronto · | 7 upvotes · 16.7K views
Migrated
from
PostgreSQL
to
MongoDB

MongoDB's document-oriented paradigm is nicely suited to the results of our ML model. We felt that this compatibility offered some time savings on figuring out and implementing an extensive data formatting and processing system. MongoDB's flexible schemas schemas (due to it being non-relational) were also attractive as a source of additional agility for our development process. The MongoDB ecosystem also has great GUI tools to simplify testing.

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Sergey Rodovinsky

At Pushnami we were looking at several alternative databases that would support following architectural requirements: - very quick prototyping for an unknown domain - ability to support large amounts of data - native ability to replicate and fail over - full stack approach for Node.js development After careful consideration MongoDB came on top, and 3 years later we are still very happy with that decision. Currently we keep almost 2TB of data in our cluster, and start thinking about sharding.

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Gabriel Pa

After using couchbase for over 4 years, we migrated to MongoDB and that was the best decision ever! I'm very disappointed with Couchbase's technical performance. Even though we received enterprise support and were a listed Couchbase Partner, the experience was horrible. With every contact, the sales team was trying to get me on a $7k+ license for access to features all other open source NoSQL databases get for free.

Here's why you should not use Couchbase

Full-text search Queries The full-text search often returns a different number of results if you run the same query multiple types

N1QL queries Configuring the indexes correctly is next to impossible. It's poorly documented and nobody seems to know what to do, even the Couchbase support engineers have no clue what they are doing.

Community support I posted several problems on the forum and I never once received a useful answer

Enterprise support It's very expensive. $7k+. The team constantly tried to get me to buy even though the community edition wasn't working great

Autonomous Operator It's actually just a poorly configured Kubernetes role that no matter what I did, I couldn't get it to work. The support team was useless. Same lack of documentation. If you do get it to work, you need 6 servers at least to meet their minimum requirements.

Couchbase cloud Typical for Couchbase, the user experience is awful and I could never get it to work.

Minimum requirements The minimum requirements in production are 6 servers. On AWS the calculated monthly cost would be ~$600. We achieved better performance using a $16 MongoDB instance on the Mongo Atlas Cloud

writing queries is a nightmare While N1QL is similar to SQL and it's easier to write because of the familiarity, that isn't entirely true. The "smart index" that Couchbase advertises is not smart at all. Creating an index with 5 fields, and only using 4 of them won't result in Couchbase using the same index, so you have to create a new one.

Couchbase UI The UI that comes with every database deployment is full of bugs, barely functional and the developer experience is poor. When I asked Couchbase about it, they basically said they don't care because real developers use SQL directly from code

Consumes too much RAM Couchbase is shipped with a smaller Memcached instance to handle the in-memory cache. Memcached ends up using 8 GB of RAM for 5000 documents! I'm not kidding! We had less than 5000 docs on a Couchbase instance and less than 20 indexes and RAM consumption was always over 8 GB

Memory allocations are useless I asked the Couchbase team a question: If a bucket has 1 GB allocated, what happens when I have more than 1GB stored? Does it overflow? Does it cache somewhere? Do I get an error? I always received the same answer: If you buy the Couchbase enterprise then we can guide you.

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Pros of MariaDB
Pros of MongoDB
Pros of MySQL
  • 149
    Drop-in mysql replacement
  • 100
    Great performance
  • 74
    Open source
  • 54
    Free
  • 44
    Easy setup
  • 15
    Easy and fast
  • 14
    Lead developer is "monty" widenius the founder of mysql
  • 6
    Also an aws rds service
  • 4
    Learning curve easy
  • 4
    Consistent and robust
  • 2
    Native JSON Support / Dynamic Columns
  • 1
    Real Multi Threaded queries on a table/db
  • 823
    Document-oriented storage
  • 589
    No sql
  • 545
    Ease of use
  • 463
    Fast
  • 405
    High performance
  • 253
    Free
  • 214
    Open source
  • 178
    Flexible
  • 140
    Replication & high availability
  • 108
    Easy to maintain
  • 40
    Querying
  • 36
    Easy scalability
  • 35
    Auto-sharding
  • 34
    High availability
  • 30
    Map/reduce
  • 26
    Document database
  • 24
    Easy setup
  • 24
    Full index support
  • 15
    Reliable
  • 14
    Fast in-place updates
  • 13
    Agile programming, flexible, fast
  • 11
    No database migrations
  • 7
    Enterprise
  • 7
    Easy integration with Node.Js
  • 5
    Enterprise Support
  • 4
    Great NoSQL DB
  • 3
    Aggregation Framework
  • 3
    Support for many languages through different drivers
  • 3
    Drivers support is good
  • 2
    Schemaless
  • 2
    Fast
  • 2
    Awesome
  • 2
    Managed service
  • 2
    Easy to Scale
  • 1
    Consistent
  • 790
    Sql
  • 673
    Free
  • 557
    Easy
  • 527
    Widely used
  • 485
    Open source
  • 180
    High availability
  • 158
    Cross-platform support
  • 103
    Great community
  • 78
    Secure
  • 75
    Full-text indexing and searching
  • 25
    Fast, open, available
  • 14
    SSL support
  • 13
    Reliable
  • 13
    Robust
  • 8
    Enterprise Version
  • 7
    Easy to set up on all platforms
  • 2
    NoSQL access to JSON data type
  • 1
    Replica Support
  • 1
    Easy, light, scalable
  • 1
    Relational database
  • 1
    Sequel Pro (best SQL GUI)

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Cons of MariaDB
Cons of MongoDB
Cons of MySQL
    Be the first to leave a con
    • 5
      Very slowly for connected models that require joins
    • 3
      Not acid compliant
    • 1
      Proprietary query language
    • 14
      Owned by a company with their own agenda
    • 1
      Can't roll back schema changes

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