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Bootstrap vs React: What are the differences?

What is Bootstrap? Simple and flexible HTML, CSS, and JS for popular UI components and interactions. Bootstrap is the most popular HTML, CSS, and JS framework for developing responsive, mobile first projects on the web.

What is React? A JavaScript library for building user interfaces. Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.

Bootstrap belongs to "Front-End Frameworks" category of the tech stack, while React can be primarily classified under "Javascript UI Libraries".

"Responsiveness", "UI components" and "Consistent" are the key factors why developers consider Bootstrap; whereas "Components", "Virtual dom" and "Performance" are the primary reasons why React is favored.

Bootstrap and React are both open source tools. Bootstrap with 134K GitHub stars and 66K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than React with 132K GitHub stars and 24.5K GitHub forks.

According to the StackShare community, Bootstrap has a broader approval, being mentioned in 7044 company stacks & 1115 developers stacks; compared to React, which is listed in 3224 company stacks and 3094 developer stacks.

Advice on Bootstrap and React
Needs advice
on
ReactReactNode.jsNode.js
and
BootstrapBootstrap

Hello Experts,

I'm trying to build a demo app to show an image, and it's metadata (EXIF data or read relevant image data from XML/DB). I need to display the image and data side-by-side. As a novice web developer, I am trying to understand what tools to pick, so it's easy to develop, maintain, and at the same time, it performs well for a huge volume of images display (something like picture/file gallery). We also want to offer one-click on one file/picture that needs to be shown in a split view. Please advise and let me know if my problem statement is unclear.

Thank you. SSK

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Replies (1)
Tarun Batra
Back End Developer at instabox · | 5 upvotes · 14.5K views

Hi Sara,

You need to decide if this is a demo app or an app which you'll want to scale and maintain. For a quick demo, I would spin up a Node.js server with server rendered frontend using Handlebars template. This way, the whole project can be maintained in one repository without much moving parts.

If you are extracting data from image itself and not from a database, you wouldn't even need Node.js. Just a React app will do. Data extraction from image can be done on client side.

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Needs advice
on
Tailwind CSSTailwind CSS
and
BootstrapBootstrap

I am planning to redesign my entire application, which is currently in Bootstrap. I heard about Tailwind CSS, and I think its really cool to work with. Is it okay if I use Bootstrap and Tailwind together? I can't remove Bootstrap altogether, as my application is using the js dependencies of Bootstrap, which I don't want to disturb.

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Replies (3)
Ivo Pereira

Factually talking about systems, we gotta make two bold headlines about each one: Bootstrap has been around for a while, has a vast community and much probably will not be gone in a while. Tailwind in the other hand, is the trendy framework starting from the past year. Referring to UI, I really prefer Tailwind, however I can't ignore the fact that a lot of libraries that emerged felt short in the end after a few years (a point where Bootstrap kept his status).

You are able to use both them together but I advise you — it will be a mess. And you gotta hope that you won't have any kind of conflicts between class naming and other general styling.

My recommendation would be to use one and only one. Perhaps rebuild the UI with a specific framework in mind, otherwise you will start to workaround things of both frameworks to contradict each other - and your team (if you work with one) will hate you.

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Arslan Ameer
at Synares Systems Pvt Ltd · | 5 upvotes · 301.6K views
Recommends
BootstrapBootstrap

You might have heard about bootstrap 5. Bootstrap is now totally jQuery free. i have tried foundation and bulma too. but eventually fall again for bootstrap, as it is most convenient and stable. i use bootstrap with less or sass.

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Barry Hylton
Recommends
BootstrapBootstrap

I use both of these regularly. If you're going to have to use Bootstrap due to your js dependencies, stick with Bootstrap. I actually prefer Tailwind, but trying to use both of them and make them "play nice" feels like making things more complex with no real benefit.

EDIT: Sorry for the late response, I just noticed how old this is. StackShare sent me this in an email for some reason so I assumed it was relatively fresh.

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Whitney Collins
markeint at wicksroofingandsolar.com · | 10 upvotes · 25K views
Needs advice
on
WebflowWebflowReactReact
and
BootstrapBootstrap

Local roofing and solar installation company with 50 employees and growing quickly. We are rebuilding the company to scale from mom-and-pop to region leader.

We want to rebuild our website > http://wicksroofing.com/ < so that we can create a customer login portal for both our clients and our employees that will pipe in progress reports from data scraped out of our ERP Acumatica.

We want to make sure to pick a website platform with the best potential for integrating with cloud-based tools to help seamless tool integrations in our operational workflows. We also want a site that loads quickly, feels high value, device reactive, and can be edited and updated by non-coding staff. I've never been on stackshare, this seems like a great resource, any advice on which website platform we should choose that meets our needs is much appreciated.

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Replies (2)
Mert Torun
Product designer at Mert Torun · | 13 upvotes · 17.2K views
Recommends
appear.inappear.in

First of all, it seems that you are comparing apples to hammers to wristwatches. Webflow, React and Bootstrap are entirely different tools trying to solve entirely different problems. So, with respect, I want to ignore that part of the question and focus on what you probably need as I understand it.

Second; the marketing website and the customer portal are different beasts entirely. They will probably have completely different problems to solve, and those will require completely different tools.

Third; as I understand from your explanation, it is yet too early to decide on a tech stack for the systems you want to build. You have some goals in mind, but those must first turn into well-thought designs that include user flows, information architecture, service design blueprints etc. as needed. Only then it may be possible to make a sensible comparison of tech tools and components that would best support that architecture.

Most techies have their favorite tools that they would vouch for, and some others that they disdain. They have their reasons for that, but those are not your reasons. A tool that has worked wonders for someone's project may create friction for you, while another that was a disaster for for someone else's project may just solve your most critical problem. There is no one size fits all answer to choice of tools. So please take all sorts of "Tool X rocks/sucks" advice with a grain of salt.

As I understand it, your company does not have the intrinsic capability or tech acumen to get this done with its own people. That's ok. Your core business is something else. But this is an important supporting business function, so I think it deserves some care and attention.

So my primary advice is: The first tool you need is a capable and experienced consultant. (If you were a bigger company, I'd say employ one full time, but with your current scale, a long-term contract with an independent professional or consulting firm will be more cost-effective). This consultant is supposed to guide you through the entire process of design and implementation of the systems you need. They should be your guide and advocate when you hire contractors to design or build your site/portal/whatever. They should make sure that the end result is aligned with your business goals.

The second thing you need is a solid design process that clearly defines the things you need (portal/website/etc.) for your -guess what again?- business goals. Decide with your consultant from step 1 on how to best get that. Contracting, partnering, and forming an internal team should all be on the table.

Only then you may realistically start to think about how to build these things. When you have your implementers (again, contracted, partnered or internal) and your detailed design documentation describing what you want in detail. those people should be able to make the best call on what sort of tech stack to use, in order to bring that design to life.

All this may sound daunting and arduous but it is not. The practice is established and solid. A simpler project can go through all that within weeks and go live. Even a larger project can launch in a couple of months and keep building on that afterwards.

On a side note, projects like this are living projects. they are never "done". Please account for having time/money/resources for these as long as they stay up. Going live is just the beginning.

So, start by finding your consultant :)

PS. StackShare forces me to "recommend a tool" before I can post this, so I'm "recommending" my favorite videoconferencing tool (which was recently renamed to Whereby but SS seems to have missed that). Feel free to get in touch for a video call if you have more questions :)

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Christopher Wray
Web Developer at Soltech LLC · | 7 upvotes · 17.4K views
Recommends
WebflowWebflow
at

Hi Whitney, I would recommend using Webflow to design the marketing website, and use Laravel for the customer portal. You can also use Webflow for the design of the customer portal area, but as far as the marketing goes, I would keep your marketing site separate from your customer app, as you won't want marketing people to have access to customer info easily, and you will want to separate concerns to keep things easy to manage.

Your desire for employees to easily update site content is easy to do with Webflow, and will be the best cms for the marketing side.

Reason why I recommend Laravel for the customer app, is that it is secure, highly scalable, well designed, and you will easily find people to help with future development of the site.

If you would like help with any of this, I would be happy to help. I have a small web development and design company.

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Daniel Hernández Alcojor
Frontend Developer at atSistemas · | 8 upvotes · 442.1K views
Needs advice
on
UIkItUIkItBulmaBulma
and
BootstrapBootstrap

I'm building, from scratch, a webapp. It's going to be a dashboard to check on our apps in New Relic and update the Apdex from the webapp. I have just chosen Next.js as our framework because we use React already, and after going through the tutorial, I just loved the latest changes they have implemented.

But we have to decide on a CSS framework for the UI. I'm partial to Bulma because I love that it's all about CSS (and you can use SCSS from the start), that it's rather lightweight and that it doesn't come with JavaScript clutter. One of the things I hate about Bootstrap is that you depend on jQuery to use the JavaScript part. My boss loves UIkIt, but when I've used it in the past, I didn't like it.

What do you think we should use? Maybe you have another suggestion?

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Replies (6)
Recommends
UIkItUIkIt

I have used bulma in several projects. We could not customize with the websites very well. Also when we need "quick solutions" Bulma is not suitable (I mean basic animations, to-top buttons, transparent navbar solutions etc. For these solutions, you need extra js codes).

Everybody knows about Bootstrap (heavy but popular).

Now we start a new project with UI kit, I like it. Pros: It is fast and lightweight and imho it has very good UI. Cons: Small community. Documentation.

Check this link for kick-off. https://github.com/zzseba78/Kick-Off

Maybe it is helpful.

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Damien Lucchese
Recommends
BulmaBulma

Been checking out Bulma, myself, and really dig it. I like that it's a great base level jumping off point. You can get a layout going with it, pretty quickly, and then customize as you want. It definitely sounds like it's the one you're leaning towards but a big factor would be who will be using it most? Your boss, yourself, others? Whichever you like best, you'll prob be most productive with but if in the end your boss says it has to be UIkit, then best to be open-minded and give it another shot. Sometimes you may not jive with new tools in your stack, at first, but then they can become tools you learn to love. Best to you in your decision! Take care & keep safe.

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Recommends
DiezDiez

I've moved away from the concept of UI kits. Not that many support CSS grid. A lot of the icons are easier to use in SVG. I've had success in the concept of design framework and design tokens. I build my brand identity in Figma, and extract in Diez. Then Diez integrates into React and SASS. Much easier because design is decoupled from software in a central authority, and software updates automatically from design changes.

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Recommends
BulmaBulma

Honestly - pick whatever you are the most comfortable with. You can achieve almost the same effects with different tools, so why not use something I like using?

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Tomer Fishaimer
Frontend Architect at Aqua Security · | 2 upvotes · 284.8K views
Recommends
Tailwind CSSTailwind CSS

Actually it really depends on your needs, there are 3 types of UI frameworks you can use:

  1. A complete set of UI components like: https://react-bulma.dev/en/getting-started.

    Pros:

    Having a lot of pre-built UI components saves a lot of time

    Cons:

    need to learn the react framework and the bulma styles, and it's harder to customize to your needs

  2. A pure css framework, like Bulma, where you write all the components yourself.

    Pros:

    A lot of flexibility to build the components you need

    Cons:

    You are bound to Bulma classes and markup.

    Takes more time since you need to build the components

  3. A utility class framework like: https://tailwindcss.com/.

Pros:

Most flexible, mix and match classes as you like and build your own markup

Very easy to customize to your needs

Cons:

Might take time to get used to and takes more time since you need to build the components

If you choose options one, then it's just a matter of deciding what style you like (material,ant, bulma) and go with the library that implements it If you go with pure css and build your own components, I can't recommend tailwind enough, I've been finding myself building entire pages without writing a single line of css.

And if later on, the designer wants to make a change to some color, or size, I just need to change one value in the config file, and the entire app is updated.

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Needs advice
on
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact
and
AngularJSAngularJS

What is the best MVC stack to build mobile-friendly, light-weight, and fast single-page application with Spring Boot as back-end (Java)? Is Bootstrap still required to front-end layer these days?

The idea is to host on-premise initially with the potential to move to the cloud. Which combo would have minimal developer ramp-up time and low long-term maintenance costs (BAU support)?

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Replies (3)
Carolyne Stopa
Full Stack Developer at Contabilizei · | 10 upvotes · 260.5K views
Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

React might be a good option if you're considering a mobile app for the future, because of react native. Although, Vue.js has the easiest learning curve and offers a better developer ramp-up time. Vue.js is great to build SPAs, very clean and organized and you won't have a lot of long-term maintenance problems (like AngularJS, for example). Bootstrap can still be used, but with flexbox there's no need anymore.

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Chaitanya Chunduri
Recommends
ReactReact

I recommend React because of less memory occupant compare to Angular, but this will depend on your organisation flexibility. When you use React you need to import different libraries as per your need. On the other side angular is a complete framework.

Performance-wise I vote for react js as it loads up quickly and lighter on the mobile. You can make good PWA with SSR as well.

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Recommends
ReactReact

If you are new to all three react will be a good choice considering, react-native will be useful if you want to build cross platform mobile application today or tomorrow. If you are talking about bootstrap styling framework than it's a choice you can style ur components by ur self or use bootstrap 4.0 framework. The complete stack mentioned above is platform agnostic u can run it anywhere you want be it cloud or on-premise.

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Needs advice
on
UIkItUIkItTailwind CSSTailwind CSS
and
BootstrapBootstrap

We are re-modifying the existing portal to the new one. Looking out for a CSS framework where over-rides are possible, the performance of page loading, extendable, etc Please suggest between tailwind, UIkit and bootstrap frameworks explaining in detail on different factors. I request your help on the same.

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Replies (2)
Brett Stevenson
Recommends
BootstrapBootstrap

I'm a big proponent of Tailwind and I personally use it whenever I get the chance, mostly because it's not really a UI-kit, but it sounds like in this case a UI-kit like Bootstrap with pre-defined components is more what you are looking for. Bootstrap is (relatively) extendable and overridable and makes it really simple to make a decent looking UI using a handful of pre-defined classes, whereas with Tailwind you configure the classes and create your own components. My main reason for replacing Bootstrap in my workflow is that it feels like the component creation has become so abstracted from the developer that any meaningful customization becomes a chore, resulting in many websites having the generic "Bootstrap-look". Nonetheless, it is effective for creating a pleasant and responsive UI. Though, I don't have any experience with UIkit.

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Collins Ogbuzuru
Front-end dev at Evolve credit · | 0 upvotes · 259.4K views
Recommends
Tailwind CSSTailwind CSS

Hey Sai, My thoughts on UIkit - It's beautiful, it's fast and it has good animation too. Why would I choose it ? Nothing other than giving the internet a new look .

My thoughts on Bootstrap - it's beautiful, if used well. It's very fast and has clean class naming convention unlike Uikit.

Why I would choose it ? It's been tested and trusted, I can find a whole lot of resources and a community around it. Also with the type of project you working on I bet Bootstrap would do the job .

My thoughts on tailwind - classic, difficult to set up and clean utilities. I wouldn't think of tailwind the way I would to Bootstrap or UIkit. What do I mean ? Tailwind is more like a tool set to create your own design flow rather than giving you a pre-designed button it gives you the ability to design yours.

My final thoughts.

If you have the time , setup and use tailwind it will give you a great chance when it comes to extending and performance.

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Needs advice
on
Vue.jsVue.jsMoment.jsMoment.js
and
ReactReact

Simple datepickers are cumbersome. For such a simple data input, I feel like it takes far too much effort. Ideally, the native input[type="date"] would just work like it does on FF and Chrome, but Safari and Edge don't handle it properly. So I'm left either having a diverging experience based on the browser or I need to choose a library to implement a datepicker since users aren't good at inputing formatted strings.

For React alone there are tons of examples to use https://reactjsexample.com/tag/date/. And then of course there's the bootstrap datepicker (https://bootstrap-datepicker.readthedocs.io/en/latest/), jQueryUI calendar picker, https://github.com/flatpickr/flatpickr, and many more.

How do you recommend going about handling date and time inputs? And then there's always moment.js, but I've observed some users getting stuck when presented with a blank text field. I'm curious to hear what's worked well for people...

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Replies (1)
Recommends
ReactReact

In my view, the upside of React is you're likely to find more existing, robust design systems (e.g. sets of components containing anything from buttons to datepickers) in the React ecosystem than Vue. UI frameworks aside, momentjs comes in when you want operate on the date(times) you get back from whatever datepicker you choose (e.g. date formatting, date match).

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Needs advice
on
ReactReact
and
Vue.jsVue.js

I find using Vue.js to be easier (more concise / less boilerplate) and more intuitive than writing React. However, there are a lot more readily available React components that I can just plug into my projects. I'm debating whether to use Vue.js or React for an upcoming project that I'm going to use to help teach a friend how to build an interactive frontend. Which would you recommend I use?

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Replies (16)
Johnny Bell
Recommends
ReactReact

I've used both Vue.js and React and I would stick with React. I know that Vue.js seems easier to write and its much faster to pick up however as you mentioned above React has way more ready made components you can just plugin, and the community for React is very big.

It might be a bit more of a steep learning curve for your friend to learn React over Vue.js but I think in the long run its the better option.

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Thomas LEVEIL
Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

I chose to use Vue.js a few years ago mainly for the easy learning curve. I have no experience with React, so I won't make any comparison here. Regarding available components, I never felt locked in because of Vue when looking for components. It happens that a component I wish to use is not available as a Vue component (and nobody published any Vue wrapper for it), but in such cases I was able to quickly hack a Vue wrapper component. In the end I don't think a decision to choose one framework over another should be made solely because of the number of components available. (And not all components in either framework is maintained, bug free, documented or easy to use)

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Recommends
ReactReact

I would also go with React. The learning curve can be a little more difficult but as soon as you got the concepts it's really easy to create things. As everybody has mentioned the React community is huge and it keeps growing, anything you may need for your project there are super high probabilities that you will find it.

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Oguzhan Cetin
Senior Developer at Melantis · | 5 upvotes · 144.3K views
Recommends
ReactReact

React is great, Vue.js is also great. But I'm personally using React, because React is changing the way I look at how JavaScript should be. This is a really big plus for me. Vue is good, but it's just another alternative. Also, too many big companies are using React, that means you can trust it for big projects.

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Ben Shichman
Recommends
ReactReact

I'd have to concur that I'd advise React. In addition to the reasons mentioned, the developer pool is significantly larger (and also slightly more expensive) for React. In time, engineering costs will even out as more and more teams adopt it. The community support is fantastic, and the available components significant.

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Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js
at

Both have their pro's and con's; however to agree what has been mentioned here before; Using Vue.js will be easier as it's learning curve isn't steep; plus learning Vue.js will teach you fundamentals which (in a sense) can be applied to React as well. Community support for React is indeed very big, but Vue.js is also still growing. Component wise, I wouldn't worry to much about that, writing your own components is also a good tool for learning a language.

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Michael R.
Full-Stack Web Developer at STHCoders · | 3 upvotes · 143.4K views
Recommends
ReactReact

Anything that interacts with the Internet, websites, applications, etc., while it may be more complex to build, will be easier to maintain in the long run. React offers more flexibility, a much larger support base for knowledge and opinion, and is just as stable asVue.

To make the best comparison in my opinion, think of React as the Android OS and Vue more like iOS. While Vue may be advantageous in some cases, it is limited by constricting parameters. On the other hand, while React may be more complex and incorporate more open-source/third-party constructs, it is supported by over 50,000 npm packages and allows for the use of JSX. Which I might add, once learned, becomes second nature to employ and offers more flexibility.

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Mark Scott
Personal Development at Mark Scott · | 3 upvotes · 144.8K views
Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

Having developed in both Vue.js and React, I agree with your assessment of Vue. It does feel light and easier to understand and therefore learn. Seeing that Vue has some genetic roots with React, I would say start your friend out on Vue. If they need to learn React later, that should give them a good foundation. If you have a Pluralsight subscription, look for my course on Vue.js and feel free to use the demo project as a starting point.

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Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

Would start with Vue especially if you want to progress more quickly and don't want/need to spend time learning React just for the sake of it. You can always pick up React later if necessary. I would caution about using "more readily available React components" just because they exist.

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Recommends
ReactReact

Virtual dom and JSX. Vue is just a baby to the race. React has it's mobile platform version as react native . so it would be easy for you and you wont reinvent the wheel again for mobile apps.

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Recommends
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact

I would recommend both of them since Vue is a UI library and helps you to design beautiful website while react allows you to handle backend problems like comment management and onspot reloading more efficiently also react includes useState and react is a framework while vue is a library

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Rajeev Borborah
Vice President Technology at WebMD · | 1 upvotes · 143.3K views
Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

We did a comparison between React, Vue and Angular and while found each capable of supporting our needs, we ended up using VueJS because of its ease of use, the ability to use templates, large and growing community and good documentation. After developing on it for a around 4 months we re-evaluated and agreed that we had made the right choice and continue to migrate our products/platform to it.

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S Milliken
Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

As others have stated there are more canned components available for React, but your observation about it's complexity is an important one. There are architectural aspects of Vue.js that lead to cleaner more concise solutions. As React apps get bigger they become a little unwieldy. Depending on your requirements you need to weigh those competing concerns. Our team is using React, but I am beginning to question that choice as time goes on. Another consideration is that Vue.js is becoming more mature as we speak. Also as others join the project, react developers should be productive in Vue.js within days. Just my 2 cents...

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Recommends
Vue.jsVue.js

VueJS hands down. Which components do you need? Have a look at Vuetify, mature project, plenty of components ready to plug and play. If on the other side you need more customization, have a look at tailwindcss. VueJS is much cleaner and IMO will overtake React soon. It's simply a better React.

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Recommends
ReactReact

It is hard to say which is good. I've used both. Vue is easier. But I feel more comfortable with React. That is why I chose React.

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Recommends
ReactReact

It all depends. Vue.js is smaller, and from what I saw (benchmarks) faster. It's also slightly more intuitive and easier to grasp. React is more popular, and the adoption rate is much higher.

Again, it all depends.

If I may, my personal choice would perhaps be either React or Svelte.

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Decisions about Bootstrap and React
Kamaleshwar BN
Head of Engineering at Dibiz Pte. Ltd. · | 10 upvotes · 321.3K views

It was easier to find people who've worked on React than Vue. Angular did not have this problem, but seemed way too bloated compared to React. Angular also brings in restrictions working within their MVC framework. React on the other hand only handles the view/rendering part and rest of the control is left to the developers. React has a very active community, support and has lots of ready-to-use plugins/libraries available.

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José Oberto
Head of Engineering & Development at Chiper · | 14 upvotes · 283.6K views

It is a very versatile library that provides great development speed. Although, with a bad organization, maintaining projects can be a disaster. With a good architecture, this does not happen.

Angular is obviously powerful and robust. I do not rule it out for any future application, in fact with the arrival of micro frontends and cross-functional teams I think it could be useful. However, if I have to build a stack from scratch again, I'm left with react.

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Valeriy Bykanov
Founder, CEO at X1 Group · | 4 upvotes · 209.8K views

Working on a new SaaS web/mobile app and ended up with React as our choice of Frontend JavaScript framework for SPA web version with React Native for iOS, Android, Windows clients.

The key takeaways:

  • Both frameworks can do the job quite well for us. This might be true for the majority of utility web apps being built out there as well, so there was no "wrong" decision here.

  • Vue is often cited as easier to learn and code on. But only in case your engineers never worked with either Vue or React and start learning them from scratch. In our case, we knew we'll be hiring engineers who already have experience in the framework we'll select - so it was not a big argument for Vue.

  • We're building our engineering team in Ukraine and realised we have 3(!) times more engineers with React experience on the market than having Vue experience.

  • Mobile - React Native, despite being a different framework, still shares a lot with React and it's just easier for React developers to start using React Native in days.

The strongest points for our decision:

  • React community is larger, means more/faster answers to your questions and existing components.

  • Way more experienced React engineers on the market.

  • React + React Native is a great combo if you're building web and mobile clients of the same app.

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John Clifford de Vera
Software Engineer at CircleYY · | 21 upvotes · 176.2K views

I used React not just because it is more popular than Angular. But the declarative and composition it gives out of the box is fascinating and React.js is just a very small UI library and you can build anything on top of it.

Composing components is the strongest asset of React for me as it can breakdown your application into smaller pieces which makes it easy to reuse and scale.

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Bridget Sarah
Full Stack Developer at Bridget Sarah · | 10 upvotes · 352.6K views

I do prefer to write things from scratch however when it came to wanting to jump-start the frontend, I found that it was taking me a lot longer hence why needing to use something very fast.

Bootstrap was the boom when it came out, I didn't like it, to be honest, set in its way and a pain to over-ride and in addition, you can tell from a distance if you're using boostrap and as everything looks the same.

I came across Tailwind CSS as I wanted more dynamic features, you could say, I've been now doing it for a few days and I love it a lot. I've been practising with the full stack part installed but I an't we wait until I do a new project, and I'll e able to select exactly what I want. Much faster.

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Máté Homolya
Senior developer at Self-employed · | 11 upvotes · 117.8K views
Migrated
from
ReactReact
to
SvelteSvelte

Svelte is everything a developer could ever want for flexible, scalable frontend development. I feel like React has reached a maturity level where there needs to be new syntactic sugar added (I'm looking at you, hooks!). I love how Svelte sets out to rebuild a new language to write interfaces in from the ground up.

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Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 20 upvotes · 809.6K views

Our whole Vue.js frontend stack (incl. SSR) consists of the following tools:

  • Nuxt.js consisting of Vue CLI, Vue Router, vuex, Webpack and Sass (Bundler for HTML5, CSS 3), Babel (Transpiler for JavaScript),
  • Vue Styleguidist as our style guide and pool of developed Vue.js components
  • Vuetify as Material Component Framework (for fast app development)
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • Apollo / GraphQL (incl. GraphiQL) for data access layer (https://apollo.vuejs.org/)
  • ESLint, TSLint and Prettier for coding style and code analyzes
  • Jest as testing framework
  • Google Fonts and Font Awesome for typography and icon toolkit
  • NativeScript-Vue for mobile development

The main reason we have chosen Vue.js over React and AngularJS is related to the following artifacts:

  • Empowered HTML. Vue.js has many similar approaches with Angular. This helps to optimize HTML blocks handling with the use of different components.
  • Detailed documentation. Vue.js has very good documentation which can fasten learning curve for developers.
  • Adaptability. It provides a rapid switching period from other frameworks. It has similarities with Angular and React in terms of design and architecture.
  • Awesome integration. Vue.js can be used for both building single-page applications and more difficult web interfaces of apps. Smaller interactive parts can be easily integrated into the existing infrastructure with no negative effect on the entire system.
  • Large scaling. Vue.js can help to develop pretty large reusable templates.
  • Tiny size. Vue.js weights around 20KB keeping its speed and flexibility. It allows reaching much better performance in comparison to other frameworks.
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Malek Boubakri
Web developer at Quicktext · | 0 upvote · 56.1K views

The project is a web gadget previously made using vanilla script and JQuery, It is a part of the "Quicktext" platform and offers an in-app live & customizable messaging widget. We made that remake with React eco-system and Typescript and we're so far happy with results. We gained tons of TS features, React scaling & re-usabilities capabilities and much more!

What do you think?

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Manatsawin Hanmongkolchai
Chose
jQueryjQuery
over
ReactReact
in

When I started TipMe, I thought about using React frontend. At the end, plain, simple jQuery won.

I had to build this iteration of the site fast and by using jQuery I could keep using Django as a full stack development tool. One important point is Django form (combined with Django Bootstrap3) means that I don't have to reinvent form rendering again, which will be the case with React.

Over time, more interactivity seeped into the site and React components start making its way into the codebase.

I now wish the site is built using React so that I could add more user friendly interfaces easier (no more fuddling with server states) but I would still say jQuery helped me get past those early days.

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Jonas Stendahl

React has by far and away been our most important library choice throughout the history of Sellpy. It is a library that offers great flexibility supported by a really strong core. The React team is doing incredible work bringing quality features to the core project and tons of quality third party libraries fill in the gaps.

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    Consistent
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    Great docs
  • 677
    Flexible
  • 466
    HTML, CSS, and JS framework
  • 411
    Open source
  • 375
    Widely used
  • 368
    Customizable
  • 241
    HTML framework
  • 76
    Popular
  • 76
    Easy setup
  • 75
    Mobile first
  • 56
    Great grid system
  • 50
    Great community
  • 38
    Future compatibility
  • 34
    Integration
  • 28
    Very powerful foundational front-end framework
  • 24
    Standard
  • 23
    Javascript plugins
  • 19
    Build faster prototypes
  • 18
    Preprocessors
  • 14
    Grids
  • 8
    Clean
  • 7
    Good for a person who hates CSS
  • 4
    Easy to setup and learn
  • 4
    Rapid development
  • 4
    Love it
  • 3
    Great and easy to use
  • 2
    Great and easy
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    Provide angular wrapper
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    Community
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    Powerful grid system, Rapid development, Customization
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    Popularity
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    Great customer support
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    Clean and quick frontend development
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    Easy to use
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    Great and easy to make a responsive website
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    Sprzedam opla
  • 1
    Material-ui
  • 1
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    It's fast
  • 1
    Boostrap
  • 1
    Pre-Defined components
  • 1
    Not tied to jQuery
  • 1
    Responsive design
  • 1
    Design Agnostic
  • 1
    Recognizable
  • 1
    Intuitive
  • 1
    Love the classes?
  • 1
    Reactjs
  • 1
    Felxible, comfortable, user-friendly
  • 1
    The fame
  • 1
    Easy setup2
  • 1
    Painless front end development
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    So clean and simple
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    Numerous components
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  • 19
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  • 16
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    Built by Facebook
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    Functional
  • 3
    Server side views
  • 3
    Props
  • 2
    Rich ecosystem
  • 2
    Obama
  • 2
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 2
    Has functional components
  • 2
    Simple
  • 2
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 2
    Super easy
  • 2
    Has arrow functions
  • 2
    Strong Community
  • 2
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 2
    SSR
  • 2
    Fast evolving
  • 2
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 2
    Excellent Documentation
  • 2
    Scales super well
  • 2
    Just the View of MVC
  • 2
    Server Side Rendering
  • 2
    Cross-platform
  • 1
    Fragments
  • 1
    Start simple
  • 1
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 1
    Permissively-licensed
  • 1
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 1
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 1
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  • 1
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 1
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Cons of Bootstrap
Cons of React
  • 25
    Javascript is tied to jquery
  • 16
    Every site uses the defaults
  • 15
    Grid system break points aren't ideal
  • 14
    Too much heavy decoration in default look
  • 8
    Verbose styles
  • 1
    Super heavy
  • 35
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 23
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 21
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 8
    JSX
  • 7
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 4
    One-way binding only
  • 2
    State consistency with backend neglected
  • 2
    Bad Documentation

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What is Bootstrap?

Bootstrap is the most popular HTML, CSS, and JS framework for developing responsive, mobile first projects on the web.

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Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.

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What are some alternatives to Bootstrap and React?
Semantic UI
Semantic empowers designers and developers by creating a shared vocabulary for UI.
jQuery
jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML.
Material
Express your creativity with Material, an animation and graphics framework for Google's Material Design and Apple's Flat UI in Swift.
Foundation
Foundation is the most advanced responsive front-end framework in the world. You can quickly prototype and build sites or apps that work on any kind of device with Foundation, which includes layout constructs (like a fully responsive grid), elements and best practices.
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Material Design is a unified system that combines theory, resources, and tools for crafting digital experiences.
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