Alternatives to React Native logo

Alternatives to React Native

Flutter, Swift, Xamarin, NativeScript, and React are the most popular alternatives and competitors to React Native.
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What is React Native and what are its top alternatives?

React Native enables you to build world-class application experiences on native platforms using a consistent developer experience based on JavaScript and React. The focus of React Native is on developer efficiency across all the platforms you care about - learn once, write anywhere. Facebook uses React Native in multiple production apps and will continue investing in React Native.
React Native is a tool in the Cross-Platform Mobile Development category of a tech stack.
React Native is an open source tool with 107.4K GitHub stars and 22.9K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to React Native's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to React Native

  • Flutter
    Flutter

    Flutter is a mobile app SDK to help developers and designers build modern mobile apps for iOS and Android. ...

  • Swift
    Swift

    Writing code is interactive and fun, the syntax is concise yet expressive, and apps run lightning-fast. Swift is ready for your next iOS and OS X project — or for addition into your current app — because Swift code works side-by-side with Objective-C. ...

  • Xamarin
    Xamarin

    Xamarin’s Mono-based products enable .NET developers to use their existing code, libraries and tools (including Visual Studio*), as well as skills in .NET and the C# programming language, to create mobile applications for the industry’s most widely-used mobile devices, including Android-based smartphones and tablets, iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. ...

  • NativeScript
    NativeScript

    NativeScript enables developers to build native apps for iOS, Android and Windows Universal while sharing the application code across the platforms. When building the application UI, developers use our libraries, which abstract the differences between the native platforms. ...

  • React
    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • Electron
    Electron

    With Electron, creating a desktop application for your company or idea is easy. Initially developed for GitHub's Atom editor, Electron has since been used to create applications by companies like Microsoft, Facebook, Slack, and Docker. The Electron framework lets you write cross-platform desktop applications using JavaScript, HTML and CSS. It is based on io.js and Chromium and is used in the Atom editor. ...

  • React Navigation
    React Navigation

    Start quickly with built-in navigators that deliver a seamless out-of-the box experience. Navigation views that deliver 60fps animations, and utilize native components to deliver a great look and feel. ...

  • Ionic
    Ionic

    Free and open source, Ionic offers a library of mobile and desktop-optimized HTML, CSS and JS components for building highly interactive apps. Use with Angular, React, Vue, or plain JavaScript. ...

React Native alternatives & related posts

Flutter logo

Flutter

13.2K
13.2K
1.1K
Cross-platform mobile framework from Google
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13.2K
+ 1
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PROS OF FLUTTER
  • 131
    Hot Reload
  • 109
    Cross platform
  • 100
    Performance
  • 85
    Backed by Google
  • 70
    Compiled into Native Code
  • 56
    Fast Development
  • 55
    Open Source
  • 49
    Fast Prototyping
  • 45
    Single Codebase
  • 45
    Expressive and Flexible UI
  • 35
    Reactive Programming
  • 32
    Material Design
  • 27
    Widget-based
  • 26
    Dart
  • 24
    Target to Fuchsia
  • 18
    IOS + Android
  • 15
    Great CLI Support
  • 14
    Easy to learn
  • 13
    You can use it as mobile, web, Server development
  • 13
    Tooling
  • 12
    Have built-in Material theme
  • 11
    Debugging quickly
  • 11
    Community
  • 11
    Target to Android
  • 11
    Good docs & sample code
  • 10
    Support by multiple IDE: Android Studio, VS Code, XCode
  • 9
    Easy Testing Support
  • 9
    Written by Dart, which is easy to read code
  • 8
    Real platform free framework of the future
  • 8
    Have built-in Cupertino theme
  • 8
    Target to iOS
  • 7
    Easy to Widget Test
  • 7
    Easy to Unit Test
CONS OF FLUTTER
  • 28
    Need to learn Dart
  • 10
    No 3D Graphics Engine Support
  • 9
    Lack of community support
  • 7
    Graphics programming
  • 6
    Lack of friendly documentation
  • 2
    Lack of promotion
  • 1
    Https://iphtechnologies.com/difference-between-flutter

related Flutter posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 2.3M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

See more
Jose Luis Alvarado Ramirez

The only two programming languages I know are Python and Dart, I fall in love with Dart when I learned about the type safeness, ease of refactoring, and the help of the IDE. I have an idea for an app, a simple app, but I need SEO and server rendering, and I also want it to be available on all platforms. I can't use Flutter or Dart anymore because of that. I have been searching and looks like there is no way to avoid learning HTML and CSS for this. I want to use Supabase as BASS, at the moment I think that I have two options if I want to learn the least amount of things because of my lack of time available:

  1. Quasar Framework: They claim that I can do all the things I need, but I have to use JavaScript, and I am going to have all those bugs with a type-safe programming language avoidable. I guess I can use TypeScript?, but that means learning both, and I am not sure if I will be able to use 100% Typescript. Besides Vue.js, Node.js, etc.

  2. Blazor and .NET: There is MAUI with razor bindings in .Net now, and also a Blazor server. And as far as I can see, the transition from Dart to C# will be easy. I guess that I have to learn some Javascript here and there, but I have to less things I guess, am I wrong? But Blazor is a new technology, Vue is widely used.

See more
Swift logo

Swift

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11.9K
1.3K
An innovative new programming language for Cocoa and Cocoa Touch.
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11.9K
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PROS OF SWIFT
  • 257
    Ios
  • 179
    Elegant
  • 125
    Not Objective-C
  • 107
    Backed by apple
  • 92
    Type inference
  • 60
    Generics
  • 54
    Playgrounds
  • 49
    Semicolon free
  • 38
    OSX
  • 35
    Tuples offer compound variables
  • 24
    Easy to learn
  • 23
    Clean Syntax
  • 22
    Open Source
  • 20
    Beautiful Code
  • 20
    Functional
  • 11
    Linux
  • 11
    Dynamic
  • 10
    Promotes safe, readable code
  • 10
    Protocol-oriented programming
  • 8
    No S-l-o-w JVM
  • 8
    Explicit optionals
  • 7
    Storyboard designer
  • 5
    Best UI concept
  • 5
    Super addicting language, great people, open, elegant
  • 5
    Type safety
  • 5
    Optionals
  • 4
    Feels like a better C++
  • 4
    Swift is faster than Objective-C
  • 4
    Its friendly
  • 4
    Faster and looks better
  • 4
    Powerful
  • 4
    Fail-safe
  • 4
    Highly Readable codes
  • 3
    Easy to Maintain
  • 3
    Easy to learn and work
  • 3
    Much more fun
  • 3
    Protocol extensions
  • 3
    Native
  • 3
    Its fun and damn fast
  • 3
    Strong Type safety
  • 2
    Protocol oriented programming
  • 2
    Esay
  • 2
    MacOS
  • 2
    Type Safe
  • 2
    All Cons C# and Java Swift Already has
  • 2
    Protocol as type
  • 1
    Objec
  • 1
    Can interface with C easily
  • 1
    Numbers with underbar
  • 1
    Optional chain
  • 1
    Runs Python 8 times faster
  • 1
    Actually don't have to own a mac
  • 1
    Free from Memory Leak
  • 1
    Swift is easier to understand for non-iOS developers.
  • 1
    Great for Multi-Threaded Programming
CONS OF SWIFT
  • 5
    Must own a mac
  • 2
    Memory leaks are not uncommon
  • 1
    Very irritatingly picky about things that’s
  • 1
    Complicated process for exporting modules
  • 1
    Its classes compile to roughly 300 lines of assembly
  • 1
    Is a lot more effort than lua to make simple functions
  • 0
    Overly complex options makes it easy to create bad code

related Swift posts

Shivam Bhargava
AVP - Business at VAYUZ Technologies Pvt. Ltd. · | 22 upvotes · 460.8K views

Hi Community! Trust everyone is keeping safe. I am exploring the idea of building a #Neobank (App) with end-to-end banking capabilities. In the process of exploring this space, I have come across multiple Apps (N26, Revolut, Monese, etc) and explored their stacks in detail. The confusion remains to be the Backend Tech to be used?

What would you go with considering all of the languages such as Node.js Java Rails Python are suggested by some person or the other. As a general trend, I have noticed the usage of Node with React on the front or Node with a combination of Kotlin and Swift. Please suggest what would be the right approach!

See more
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 13 upvotes · 1.3M views

Excerpts from how we developed (and subsequently open sourced) Uber's cross-platform mobile architecture framework, RIBs , going from Objective-C to Swift in the process for iOS: https://github.com/uber/RIBs

Uber’s new application architecture (RIBs) extensively uses protocols to keep its various components decoupled and testable. We used this architecture for the first time in our new rider application and moved our primary language from Objective-C to Swift. Since Swift is a very static language, unit testing became problematic. Dynamic languages have good frameworks to build test mocks, stubs, or stand-ins by dynamically creating or modifying existing concrete classes.

Needless to say, we were not very excited about the additional complexity of manually writing and maintaining mock implementations for each of our thousands of protocols.

The information required to generate mock classes already exists in the Swift protocol. For Uber’s use case, we set out to create tooling that would let engineers automatically generate test mocks for any protocol they wanted by simply annotating them.

The iOS codebase for our rider application alone incorporates around 1,500 of these generated mocks. Without our code generation tool, all of these would have to be written and maintained by hand, which would have made testing much more time-intensive. Auto-generated mocks have contributed a lot to the unit test coverage that we have today.

We built these code generation tools ourselves for a number of reasons, including that there weren’t many open source tools available at the time we started our effort. Today, there are some great open source tools to generate resource accessors, like SwiftGen. And Sourcery can help you with generic code generation needs:

https://eng.uber.com/code-generation/ https://eng.uber.com/driver-app-ribs-architecture/

(GitHub : https://github.com/uber/RIBs )

See more
Xamarin logo

Xamarin

1.2K
1.5K
784
Create iOS, Android and Mac apps in C#
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1.5K
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784
PROS OF XAMARIN
  • 121
    Power of c# on mobile devices
  • 81
    Native performance
  • 78
    Native apps with native ui controls
  • 73
    No javascript - truely compiled code
  • 67
    Sharing more than 90% of code over all platforms
  • 45
    Ability to leverage visual studio
  • 44
    Mvvm pattern
  • 44
    Many great c# libraries
  • 36
    Amazing support
  • 34
    Powerful platform for .net developers
  • 19
    GUI Native look and Feel
  • 16
    Nuget package manager
  • 12
    Free
  • 9
    Backed by Microsoft
  • 9
    Enables code reuse on server
  • 8
    Faster Development
  • 7
    Use of third-party .NET libraries
  • 7
    It's free since Apr 2016
  • 7
    Best performance than other cross-platform
  • 7
    Easy Debug and Trace
  • 7
    Open Source
  • 6
    Mac IDE (Xamarin Studio)
  • 6
    Xamarin.forms is the best, it's amazing
  • 5
    That just work for every scenario
  • 5
    C# mult paradigm language
  • 5
    Power of C#, no javascript, visual studio
  • 4
    Great docs
  • 4
    Compatible to develop Hybrid apps
  • 4
    Microsoft stack
  • 4
    Microsoft backed
  • 3
    Well Designed
  • 3
    Small learning curve for Mobile developers
  • 2
    Ionic
  • 2
    Ability to leverage legacy C and C++
CONS OF XAMARIN
  • 9
    Build times
  • 5
    Visual Studio
  • 3
    Complexity
  • 3
    Scalability
  • 3
    Price
  • 2
    Nuget
  • 2
    Maturity
  • 2
    Build Tools
  • 2
    Support
  • 0
    Maturidade
  • 0
    Performance

related Xamarin posts

Greg Neumann
Indie, Solo, Developer · | 8 upvotes · 1M views

Finding the most effective dev stack for a solo developer. Over the past year, I've been looking at many tech stacks that would be 'best' for me, as a solo, indie, developer to deliver a desktop app (Windows & Mac) plus mobile - iOS mainly. Initially, Xamarin started to stand-out. Using .NET Core as the run-time, Xamarin as the native API provider and Xamarin Forms for the UI seemed to solve all issues. But, the cracks soon started to appear. Xamarin Forms is mobile only; the Windows incarnation is different. There is no Mac UI solution (you have to code it natively in Mac OS Storyboard. I was also worried how Xamarin Forms , if I was to use it, was going to cope, in future, with Apple's new SwiftUI and Google's new Fuchsia.

This plethora of techs for the UI-layer made me reach for the safer waters of using Web-techs for the UI. Lovely! Consistency everywhere (well, mostly). But that consistency evaporates when platform issues are addressed. There are so many web frameworks!

But, I made a simple decision. It's just me...I am clever, but there is no army of coders here. And I have big plans for a business app. How could just 1 developer go-on to deploy a decent app to Windows, iPhone, iPad & Mac OS? I remembered earlier days when I've used Microsoft's ASP.NET to scaffold - generate - loads of Code for a web-app that I needed for several charities that I worked with. What 'generators' exist that do a lot of the platform-specific rubbish, allow the necessary customisation of such platform integration and provide a decent UI?

I've placed my colours to the Quasar Framework mast. Oh dear, that means Electron desktop apps doesn't it? Well, Ive had enough of loads of Developers saying that "the menus won't look native" or "it uses too much RAM" and so on. I've been using non-native UI-wrapped apps for ages - the date picker in Outlook on iOS is way better than the native date-picker and I'd been using it for years without getting hot under the collar about it. Developers do get so hung-up on things that busy Users hardly notice; don't you think?. As to the RAM usage issue; that's a bit true. But Users only really notice when an app uses so much RAM that the machine starts to page-out. Electron contributes towards that horizon but does not cause it. My Users will be business-users after all. Somewhat decent machines.

Looking forward to all that lovely Vue.js around my TypeScript and all those really, really, b e a u t I f u l UI controls of Quasar Framework . Still not sure that 1 dev can deliver all that... but I'm up for trying...

See more
Bhupendra Madhu
Web Developer at Ecombooks · | 8 upvotes · 70.4K views

I want to learn cross-platform application frameworks like React Native, Flutter, Xamarin, or Ionic, and I'm a web developer. I can learn other programming languages as well. But I'm confused about what to learn, which framework is best, and which framework will last long as the application grows further into complexity.

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NativeScript logo

NativeScript

531
1.1K
516
Build truly native apps with JavaScript
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1.1K
+ 1
516
PROS OF NATIVESCRIPT
  • 75
    Access to the entire native api
  • 47
    Support for native ios and android libraries
  • 46
    Support for javascript libraries
  • 46
    Angular 2.0 support
  • 44
    Native ux and performance
  • 37
    Typescript support
  • 35
    Backed up by google and telerik
  • 29
    Css support
  • 27
    Cross-platform declarative ui and code
  • 25
    Fully open source under apache 2.0 license
  • 11
    Vuejs support
  • 9
    60fps performance
  • 6
    Powerful data visualization with native UI
  • 5
    VS Code integration
  • 5
    No need for Mac to build iOS apps in Telerik Platform
  • 5
    Angular, typescript and javascript support
  • 4
    Extended CLI support
  • 4
    Cloud builds as part of Telerik PLatform
  • 4
    Truly Object-Oriented with Typescript
  • 4
    On-device debugging
  • 4
    Extensibility
  • 3
    Access to entire native api
  • 3
    0 day support for new OS updates
  • 3
    Easiest of all other frameworks
  • 3
    Easy to learn
  • 3
    Backed by google
  • 3
    Live reload
  • 3
    Publishing modules to NPM
  • 2
    Vue.js support out of the box
  • 2
    VueJS support
  • 2
    Svelte support
  • 2
    Powerfull mobile services as part of Telerik Platform
  • 2
    Native ui with angular
  • 2
    Vue support
  • 1
    Playground
  • 1
    Hot Reload
  • 1
    HMR via webpack
  • 1
    Very small app size
  • 1
    Write once, use anywhere
  • 1
    Easy to use, support for almost all npm packages
  • 1
    Rich ecosystem
  • 1
    Compile to Apple/Google Stores via CloudCompiler
  • 1
    Has CSS ;-)
  • 1
    It works with Angular
  • 1
    Code reuse with your website
  • 0
    Dart
CONS OF NATIVESCRIPT
  • 5
    Lack of promotion
  • 1
    Slower Performance compared to competitors

related NativeScript posts

Hello,

We're just brainstorming for the moment and we have a few questions.

We have an idea for an app that we want to develop, here are the prerequisites:

1) cross-platform (iOS, Android, and website);

2) as easy to maintain as possible / well documented / widely used;

3) Visual Studio Code and Copilot compatible;

4) Text to speech;

5) Speech recognition;

6) Running in background (screen off with TTS and speech recognition);

7) could be using TypeScript;

8) Monetized through ad and in-App payment for premium version;

9) Display on lock screen (Android only I guess)

So what would you recommend?

I've been trying to review the options available, and I've considered:

  • NativeScript

  • React Native

  • Flutter

  • Any other?

Thanks in advance for your help, and I'm open to any comments.

See more
leonardo silveira
Software Engineer at Jobsity · | 5 upvotes · 237.7K views

So, i am preparing to adopt NativeScript.

For years my hybrid projects used Apache Cordova.

"Let's avoid to maintain two teams and double the deliver velocity".

It was good for a few years, we had those september issues, (i.e. apple broke some backward compatibility) , but for the last years, things seems to be losing the grip faster.

Last breaking changes, for instance, seems to have a workaround, however that growing feeling that simple things can not rely on so fragile webviews keeps growing faster and faster.

I've tested nativescript not only on it's "helloworld", but also on how do they respond on issues.

I got tweed support. I opened an github issue and got answers on less than 10 hours (yes i did it on another timezone and very close to a weekend). I saw the faulty docs get corrected in two days.

The bad news is i only can adopt nativescript on newer projects, since there is no budget to revamp the current solutions.

The good news is i can keep coding on Vue.js , without vou router, but that's ok. I've already exchanged vanilla html for real native app with background magic enabled, the router can be easily reproduced.

See more
React logo

React

146.8K
121.4K
4K
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
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PROS OF REACT
  • 801
    Components
  • 663
    Virtual dom
  • 572
    Performance
  • 500
    Simplicity
  • 442
    Composable
  • 183
    Data flow
  • 165
    Declarative
  • 126
    Isn't an mvc framework
  • 116
    Reactive updates
  • 113
    Explicit app state
  • 44
    JSX
  • 27
    Learn once, write everywhere
  • 20
    Uni-directional data flow
  • 20
    Easy to Use
  • 16
    Works great with Flux Architecture
  • 11
    Great perfomance
  • 9
    Built by Facebook
  • 9
    Javascript
  • 7
    TypeScript support
  • 6
    Speed
  • 5
    Hooks
  • 5
    Excellent Documentation
  • 5
    Props
  • 5
    Functional
  • 5
    Easy as Lego
  • 5
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 5
    Cross-platform
  • 5
    Server Side Rendering
  • 5
    Feels like the 90s
  • 5
    Easy to start
  • 5
    Awesome
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 4
    Strong Community
  • 4
    Server side views
  • 4
    Fancy third party tools
  • 4
    Scales super well
  • 4
    Start simple
  • 4
    Super easy
  • 3
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 3
    Fast evolving
  • 3
    SSR
  • 3
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 3
    Rich ecosystem
  • 3
    Simple
  • 3
    Has functional components
  • 3
    Allows creating single page applications
  • 3
    Has arrow functions
  • 3
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 3
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 3
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 3
    Just the View of MVC
  • 2
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 2
    Fragments
  • 2
    Sharable
  • 2
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 2
    Permissively-licensed
  • 1
    Image upload
  • 1
    HTML-like
  • 1
    Recharts
CONS OF REACT
  • 38
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 27
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 26
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 10
    JSX
  • 8
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 6
    One-way binding only
  • 3
    State consistency with backend neglected
  • 3
    Bad Documentation
  • 2
    Paradigms change too fast
  • 2
    Error boundary is needed

related React posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 2.3M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

See more
Adebayo Akinlaja
Engineering Manager at Andela · | 29 upvotes · 1.6M views

I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

See more
Electron logo

Electron

9.8K
8.9K
140
Build cross platform desktop apps with JavaScript, HTML, and CSS
9.8K
8.9K
+ 1
140
PROS OF ELECTRON
  • 66
    Easy to make rich cross platform desktop applications
  • 51
    Open source
  • 13
    Great looking apps such as Slack and Visual Studio Code
  • 7
    Because it's cross platform
  • 3
    Use Node.js in the Main Process
CONS OF ELECTRON
  • 18
    Uses a lot of memory
  • 8
    User experience never as good as a native app
  • 4
    No proper documentation
  • 4
    Does not native
  • 1
    Each app needs to install a new chromium + nodejs
  • 1
    Wrong reference for dom inspection

related Electron posts

The Slack desktop app was originally written us the MacGap framework, which used Apple’s WebView to host web content inside of a native app frame. As this approach continued to present product limitations, Slack decided to migrate the desktop app to Electron. Electron is a platform that combines the rendering engine from Chromium and the Node.js runtime and module system. The desktop app is written as a modern ES6 + async/await React application.

For the desktop app, Slack takes a hybrid approach, wherein some of the assets ship as part of the app, but most of their assets and code are loaded remotely.

See more

Slack's new desktop application was launched for macOS. It was built using Electron for a faster, frameless look with a host of background improvements for a superior Slack experience. Instead of adopting a complete-in-box approach taken by other apps, Slack prefers a hybrid approach where some of the assets are loaded as part of the app, while others are made available remotely. Slack's original desktop app was written using the MacGap v1 framework using WebView to host web content within the native app frame. But it was difficult to upgrade with new features only available to Apple's WKWebView and moving to this view called for a total application rewrite.

Electron brings together Chromium's rendering engine with the Node.js runtime and module system. The new desktop app is now based on an ES6 + async/await React application is currently being moved gradually to TypeScript. Electron functions on Chromium's multi-process model, with each Slack team signed into a separate process and memory space. It also helps prevent remote content to directly access desktop features using a feature called WebView Element which creates a fresh Chromium renderer process and assigns rendering of content for its hosting renderer. Additional security can be ensured by preventing Node.js modules from leaking into the API surface and watching out for APIs with file paths. Communication between processes on Electron is carried out via electron-remote, a pared-down, zippy version of Electron's remote module, which makes implementing the web apps UI much easier.

See more
React Navigation logo

React Navigation

590
326
1
Flexible navigation library for React Native and web. Learn once, navigate anywhere.
590
326
+ 1
1
PROS OF REACT NAVIGATION
  • 1
    Easy to use
CONS OF REACT NAVIGATION
    Be the first to leave a con

    related React Navigation posts

    Ionic logo

    Ionic

    8.6K
    7.9K
    1.8K
    A beautiful front-end framework for developing cross-platform apps with web technologies like Angular and React.
    8.6K
    7.9K
    + 1
    1.8K
    PROS OF IONIC
    • 248
      Allows for rapid prototyping
    • 228
      Hybrid mobile
    • 208
      It's angularjs
    • 186
      Free
    • 179
      It's javascript, html, and css
    • 109
      Ui and theming
    • 77
      Great designs
    • 74
      Mv* pattern
    • 71
      Reuse frontend devs on mobile
    • 65
      Extensibility
    • 31
      Great community
    • 29
      Open source
    • 23
      Responsive design
    • 21
      Good cli
    • 14
      So easy to use
    • 13
      Angularjs-based
    • 13
      Beautifully designed
    • 12
      Widgets
    • 11
      Typescript
    • 11
      Allows for rapid prototyping, hybrid mobile
    • 10
      Quick prototyping, amazing community
    • 10
      Easy setup
    • 8
      Angular2 support
    • 7
      Base on angular
    • 7
      Fast, easy, free
    • 7
      So much thought behind what developers actually need
    • 7
      Because of the productivity and easy for development
    • 6
      Super fast, their dev team is amazingly passionate
    • 6
      Easy to use
    • 6
      It's Angular
    • 4
      Hot deploy
    • 4
      UI is awesome
    • 3
      Amazing support
    • 3
      Easy setup, development and testing
    • 3
      Material design support using theme
    • 3
      It's the future
    • 3
      Angular
    • 3
      Allow for rapid prototyping
    • 3
      Ionic creator
    • 2
      User Friendly
    • 2
      It's angular js
    • 2
      Complete package
    • 2
      Simple & Fast
    • 2
      Removes 300ms delay in mobile browsers
    • 2
      Fastest growing mobile app framework
    • 2
      Best Support and Community
    • 2
      Material Design By Default
    • 2
      Cross platform
    • 2
      Documentation
    • 2
      Because I can use my existing web devloper skills
    • 1
      Ionic conect codeigniter
    • 1
      Fast Prototyping
    • 1
      All Trending Stack
    • 1
      Native access
    • 1
      Typescript support
    CONS OF IONIC
    • 20
      Not suitable for high performance or UI intensive apps
    • 15
      Not meant for game development
    • 2
      Not a native app

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