Alternatives to Strapi logo

Alternatives to Strapi

Contentful, Netlify CMS, Firebase, Directus, and Parse-Server are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Strapi.
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What is Strapi and what are its top alternatives?

Strapi is an open-source headless CMS that enables content-rich experiences to be created, managed, and delivered across all digital channels. Its key features include customizable APIs, content modeling, user roles and permissions, internationalization, media library, plugins ecosystem, and role-based access control. However, Strapi might have a steep learning curve for beginners and lacks advanced features compared to other enterprise-level CMS solutions.

  1. Contentful: Contentful is a flexible and scalable headless CMS that allows teams to manage content across multiple channels through their RESTful and GraphQL APIs. Key features include customizable content models, rich text editing, webhooks, and role-based access control. Pros: Strong developer tools and good performance. Cons: Could be cost-prohibitive for small businesses.

  2. GraphCMS: GraphCMS is a headless CMS with a GraphQL API that allows developers to build content-rich applications easily. Key features include content modeling, asset management, webhooks, localization, and versioning. Pros: User-friendly interface and extensive documentation. Cons: Limited support for non-technical users.

  3. Directus: Directus is an open-source headless CMS that provides a real-time data API and an intuitive interface for managing content. Key features include custom tables, data modeling, role-based permissions, and image editing. Pros: Completely free and customizable. Cons: Limited community support compared to other options.

  4. Sanity: Sanity is a flexible headless CMS with a real-time collaborative content editing platform. Key features include customizable data models, portable text fields, image handling, and rich text editing with customizable blocks. Pros: Excellent developer experience and fast performance. Cons: Higher learning curve for beginners.

  5. Kentico Kontent: Kentico Kontent is a cloud-based headless CMS that allows teams to collaborate on structured content. Key features include structured content modeling, versioning, webhooks, and content collaboration tools. Pros: Easy to use interface and strong support for content localization. Cons: Limited flexibility in data modeling compared to other options.

  6. ButterCMS: ButterCMS is a headless CMS platform designed for blogs, dynamic pages, and e-commerce websites. Key features include blog engine, content API, dynamic pages, and e-commerce integrations. Pros: Quick setup and easy integration with existing websites. Cons: Limited customization options compared to other tools.

  7. Prismic: Prismic is a headless CMS that offers content management with a strong visual editor and RESTful API. Key features include content modeling, custom types, rich text editing, and content versioning. Pros: Easy setup and dynamic content delivery. Cons: Limited support for complex data relationships.

  8. Strapi Alternatives: Strapi Alternatives is a curated list of other headless CMS options for developers to explore based on specific needs and requirements.

  9. Cockpit: Cockpit is an open-source headless CMS with a flexible content structure and a customizable API. Key features include collection management, asset manager, RESTful API, and multi-language support. Pros: Lightweight and easy to install. Cons: Limited community support compared to other options.

  10. Microweber: Microweber is a drag-and-drop website builder with headless CMS capabilities that allow users to create and manage content easily. Key features include visual editing, e-commerce functionality, blog management, and SEO tools. Pros: Intuitive interface and built-in website builder tools. Cons: Limited options for data modeling and custom APIs.

Top Alternatives to Strapi

  • Contentful
    Contentful

    With Contentful, you can bring your content anywhere using our APIs, completely customize your content structure all while using your preferred programming languages and frameworks. ...

  • Netlify CMS
    Netlify CMS

    It is built as a single-page React app. You can create custom-styled previews, UI widgets, and editor plugins or add backends to support different Git platform APIs. ...

  • Firebase
    Firebase

    Firebase is a cloud service designed to power real-time, collaborative applications. Simply add the Firebase library to your application to gain access to a shared data structure; any changes you make to that data are automatically synchronized with the Firebase cloud and with other clients within milliseconds. ...

  • Directus
    Directus

    Let's say you're planning on managing content for a website, native app, and widget. Instead of using a CMS that's baked into the website client, it makes more sense to decouple your content entirely and access it through an API or SDK. That's a headless CMS. That's Directus. ...

  • Parse-Server
    Parse-Server

    A Parse.com API compatible router package for Express. Read the announcement blog post here: http://blog.parse.com/announcements/introducing-parse-server-and-the-database-migration-tool/. Read the migration guide here: https://parse.com/docs/server/guide#migrating ...

  • Cockpit
    Cockpit

    An API-driven CMS without forcing you to make compromises in how you implement your site. The CMS for developers. Manage content like collections, regions, forms and galleries which you can reuse anywhere on your website. ...

  • WordPress
    WordPress

    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family. ...

  • GraphCMS
    GraphCMS

    GraphCMS is a GraphQL Based Headless Content Management System. It lets you build a hosted GraphQL backend for your applications and gives you all the tools you need to manage your content. ...

Strapi alternatives & related posts

Contentful logo

Contentful

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Contentful is a cloud-based API-first content platform
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PROS OF CONTENTFUL
  • 30
    API-based cms
  • 17
    Much better than WordPress
  • 11
    Simple and customizable
  • 5
    Images API
  • 3
    Free for small projects
  • 1
    Extensible dashboard UI
  • 1
    Super simple to integrate
  • 1
    Managed Service
  • 1
    Tag Manager like UI
CONS OF CONTENTFUL
  • 5
    No spell check
  • 5
    No repeater Field
  • 4
    No free plan
  • 3
    Slow dashboard
  • 2
    Enterprise targeted
  • 2
    Pricey
  • 2
    Limited content types
  • 1
    Not scalable
  • 1
    No GraphQL API

related Contentful posts

Hi, I went through a comprehensive analysis - of headless/api content management systems - essentially to store content "bits" and publish them where needed (website, 3rd party sites, social media, etc.). I had considered many other solutions but ultimately chose Directus. I believe that was a good choice.

I had strongly considered Contentful, Strapi, Sanity, and hygraph. Hygraph came in #2 and contentful #3.

Ultimately I liked directus for:

(1) time in business

(2) open source

(3) integration with n8n and Pipedream

(4) pricing

(5) extensibility

Thoughts? Was this a good choice? We have many WordPress sites we're not (at least now) looking to replace with Directus, but instead to push to.

I'd love some feedback.

See more
Shared insights
on
ContentfulContentfulFirebaseFirebase

Hi. I am gonna build a simple app for a company to ease their work. The company is sending out pdf files to their users' email. The data is a health analysis with a lot of different health values. The app should be an MVP, where users can watch their data instead of opening a pdf file. The company should be able to fill in the data in either Firebase or Contentful database. Is Contentful or Firebase best for this solution? What is your opinion?

See more
Netlify CMS logo

Netlify CMS

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Open source content management for your Git workflow
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PROS OF NETLIFY CMS
  • 3
    Open source
  • 2
    Free
  • 1
    GraphQL API
CONS OF NETLIFY CMS
  • 2
    No relations between items

related Netlify CMS posts

Hanna Rosenfeld

Hi,

for my last project, my client wanted a CMS to edit basically the entire webpage. I used Netlify CMS for this, but I ran into a lot of issues. I am not sure if CMSs are just hard in general.

What matters to me is pricing (ideally free forever) and that the CMS is easy to use and SIMPLE.

Is Storyblok better than NetlifyCMS? Or should I try Contentful?

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Jan Vlnas
Developer Advocate at Superface · | 4 upvotes · 45.5K views

Depends on what options and technologies you have available, and how do you deploy your website.

There are CMSs which update existing static pages through FTP: You provide access credentials, mark editable parts of your HTML in a markup, and then edit the content through the hosted CMS. I know two systems which work like that: Cushy CMS and Surreal CMS.

If the source of your site is versioned through Git (and hosted on GitHub), you have other options, like Netlify CMS, Spinal CMS, Siteleaf, Forestry, or CloudCannon. Some of these also need you to use static site generator (like 11ty, Jekyll, or Hugo).

If you have some server-side scripting support available (typically PHP) you can also consider some flat-file based, server-side systems, like Kirby CMS or Lektor, which are usually simpler to retrofit into an existing template than “traditional” CMSs (WordPress, Drupal).

Finally, you could also use a desktop-based static site generator which provides a user-friendly GUI, and then locally generates and uploads the website. For example Publii, YouDoCMS, Agit CMS.

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Firebase logo

Firebase

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The Realtime App Platform
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PROS OF FIREBASE
  • 371
    Realtime backend made easy
  • 270
    Fast and responsive
  • 242
    Easy setup
  • 215
    Real-time
  • 191
    JSON
  • 134
    Free
  • 128
    Backed by google
  • 83
    Angular adaptor
  • 68
    Reliable
  • 36
    Great customer support
  • 32
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Real-time synchronization
  • 21
    Mobile friendly
  • 19
    Rapid prototyping
  • 14
    Great security
  • 12
    Automatic scaling
  • 11
    Freakingly awesome
  • 8
    Super fast development
  • 8
    Angularfire is an amazing addition!
  • 8
    Chat
  • 6
    Firebase hosting
  • 6
    Built in user auth/oauth
  • 6
    Awesome next-gen backend
  • 6
    Ios adaptor
  • 4
    Speed of light
  • 4
    Very easy to use
  • 3
    Great
  • 3
    It's made development super fast
  • 3
    Brilliant for startups
  • 2
    Free hosting
  • 2
    Cloud functions
  • 2
    JS Offline and Sync suport
  • 2
    Low battery consumption
  • 2
    .net
  • 2
    The concurrent updates create a great experience
  • 2
    Push notification
  • 2
    I can quickly create static web apps with no backend
  • 2
    Great all-round functionality
  • 2
    Free authentication solution
  • 1
    Easy Reactjs integration
  • 1
    Google's support
  • 1
    Free SSL
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    CDN & cache out of the box
  • 1
    Easy to use
  • 1
    Large
  • 1
    Faster workflow
  • 1
    Serverless
  • 1
    Good Free Limits
  • 1
    Simple and easy
CONS OF FIREBASE
  • 31
    Can become expensive
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    No open source, you depend on external company
  • 15
    Scalability is not infinite
  • 9
    Not Flexible Enough
  • 7
    Cant filter queries
  • 3
    Very unstable server
  • 3
    No Relational Data
  • 2
    Too many errors
  • 2
    No offline sync

related Firebase posts

Johnny Bell

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

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Collins Ogbuzuru
Front-end dev at Evolve credit · | 20 upvotes · 27.5K views

Your tech stack is solid for building a real-time messaging project.

React and React Native are excellent choices for the frontend, especially if you want to have both web and mobile versions of your application share code.

ExpressJS is an unopinionated framework that affords you the flexibility to use it's features at your term, which is a good start. However, I would recommend you explore Sails.js as well. Sails.js is built on top of Express.js and it provides additional features out of the box, especially the Websocket integration that your project requires.

Don't forget to set up Graphql codegen, this would improve your dev experience (Add Typescript, if you can too).

I don't know much about databases but you might want to consider using NO-SQL. I used Firebase real-time db and aws dynamo db on a few of my personal projects and I love they're easy to work with and offer more flexibility for a chat application.

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Directus logo

Directus

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Free and Open-Source Headless CMS
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PROS OF DIRECTUS
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    Open Source
  • 10
    API-based CMS
  • 8
    Self-hostable
  • 4
    Version 9 is Javascript Based
  • 2
    Graphql
  • 1
    Data visualizations
  • 1
    Flows
  • 1
    User permissisons
  • 1
    User roles
  • 1
    Components
  • 1
    Modular
  • 1
    Responsiveness
  • 1
    Useful API
  • 1
    Metrics
CONS OF DIRECTUS
  • 4
    Php based

related Directus posts

Hi, I went through a comprehensive analysis - of headless/api content management systems - essentially to store content "bits" and publish them where needed (website, 3rd party sites, social media, etc.). I had considered many other solutions but ultimately chose Directus. I believe that was a good choice.

I had strongly considered Contentful, Strapi, Sanity, and hygraph. Hygraph came in #2 and contentful #3.

Ultimately I liked directus for:

(1) time in business

(2) open source

(3) integration with n8n and Pipedream

(4) pricing

(5) extensibility

Thoughts? Was this a good choice? We have many WordPress sites we're not (at least now) looking to replace with Directus, but instead to push to.

I'd love some feedback.

See more
Parse-Server logo

Parse-Server

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Parse-compatible API server module for Node/Express
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PROS OF PARSE-SERVER
  • 13
    Open Source
  • 7
    Well documented
  • 4
    Easy setup, easy api, Fast,more platforms,realtime
  • 3
    No vendor lock-in
  • 2
    JSON
  • 2
    Backed by People
  • 1
    Friendly contributor community
CONS OF PARSE-SERVER
  • 1
    No guarantee (comes as is)

related Parse-Server posts

Cockpit logo

Cockpit

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Add content management functionality to any site - plug & play CMS
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PROS OF COCKPIT
  • 3
    Flexible and plays nicely with any frontend
  • 3
    Easy for Content Managers to understand and use
  • 3
    Open Source
  • 2
    Fast & lightweight
  • 2
    Modular
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    GraphQL
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    Self hosted
CONS OF COCKPIT
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Cockpit posts

    WordPress logo

    WordPress

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    A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability.
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    PROS OF WORDPRESS
    • 415
      Customizable
    • 366
      Easy to manage
    • 354
      Plugins & themes
    • 258
      Non-tech colleagues can update website content
    • 247
      Really powerful
    • 145
      Rapid website development
    • 78
      Best documentation
    • 51
      Codex
    • 44
      Product feature set
    • 35
      Custom/internal social network
    • 18
      Open source
    • 8
      Great for all types of websites
    • 7
      Huge install and user base
    • 5
      Perfect example of user collaboration
    • 5
      Open Source Community
    • 5
      Most websites make use of it
    • 5
      It's simple and easy to use by any novice
    • 5
      Best
    • 5
      I like it like I like a kick in the groin
    • 4
      Community
    • 4
      API-based CMS
    • 3
      Easy To use
    • 2
      <a href="https://secure.wphackedhel">Easy Beginner</a>
    CONS OF WORDPRESS
    • 13
      Hard to keep up-to-date if you customize things
    • 13
      Plugins are of mixed quality
    • 10
      Not best backend UI
    • 2
      Complex Organization
    • 1
      Do not cover all the basics in the core
    • 1
      Great Security

    related WordPress posts

    Dale Ross
    Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 1.6M views

    I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

    I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

    Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

    See more
    A White
    Front End Web Dev at Burnt Design · | 21 upvotes · 80.5K views

    Below is my own professional history to give some context to my current skill set. I have been a front-end dev for 18 years. My tools of choice are:

    • HTML5
    • CSS 3
    • JavaScript
    • WordPress
    • PHP (but not my strongest skill as I don't write it too often)

    I first of all would like to become a better and more 'full stack' developer, and I have a business idea that will hopefully allow me to move in this direction. The queries I have will result in which approach I take here. One of the most important aspects to me is the system being 'future proof'. If successful I know I will eventually bring additional developers on board, and they will likely be better developers than me! I want to avoid them having to rebuild the system and would like it to be something that they can just expand and improve on.

    The business which I'd like to create is the following (in a nutshell), I have ideas for many more features, but this is how I'd like to begin:

    Web-based system for gym management & marketing. Specifically a class-based gym

    1. One-stop shop for a class-based gym owner
    2. Sell memberships
    3. Manage class bookings
    4. Reporting
    5. Automatically generated website
    6. Choose a pre-designed template and amend the content through their dashboard
    7. Marketing
    8. Easily send a newsletter to members
    9. Book a free trial form on the website linked directly to the booking system

    Important requirements

    1. One system, one dashboard. I would like the gym owner to have one place to control everything. Members, marketing, and website amendments.
    2. Future proof. These features are the bare minimum and I'd like to keep expanding on the features as time goes on. Things like uploading programming for members, messaging between members and admin, and selling merchandise via the website.
    3. Fast to load & secure. I live in the WordPress world right now, which isn't the fastest or most secure environment. I appreciate there are better ways to develop a system like this, but I'm a little clueless about where to start.
    4. Mobile. The data created should easily communicate with a mobile app that customers will download to manage their memberships and class bookings.

    TIA to anybody that can provide some guidance on where to start here.

    See more
    GraphCMS logo

    GraphCMS

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    GraphQL Headless Content Management System
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    PROS OF GRAPHCMS
    • 5
      GraphQL
    • 2
      Speeds up time to market Easily create & consume conten
    • 1
      API first
    • 1
      Much better than REST
    • 1
      Reliable and scales
    • 1
      Cool dev community
    CONS OF GRAPHCMS
      Be the first to leave a con

      related GraphCMS posts