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Ruby

22.1K
13.8K
+ 1
3.9K
Stan

41
22
+ 1
0
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Ruby vs Stan: What are the differences?

Ruby: A dynamic, interpreted, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. Ruby is a language of careful balance. Its creator, Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, blended parts of his favorite languages (Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp) to form a new language that balanced functional programming with imperative programming; Stan: A Probabilistic Programming Language. A state-of-the-art platform for statistical modeling and high-performance statistical computation. Used for statistical modeling, data analysis, and prediction in the social, biological, and physical sciences, engineering, and business.

Ruby and Stan are primarily classified as "Languages" and "Machine Learning" tools respectively.

Ruby and Stan are both open source tools. Ruby with 15.9K GitHub stars and 4.26K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than Stan with 1.61K GitHub stars and 279 GitHub forks.

Decisions about Ruby and Stan
Andrew Carpenter
Chief Software Architect at Xelex Digital, LLC · | 16 upvotes · 123.2K views

In 2015 as Xelex Digital was paving a new technology path, moving from ASP.NET web services and web applications, we knew that we wanted to move to a more modular decoupled base of applications centered around REST APIs.

To that end we spent several months studying API design patterns and decided to use our own adaptation of CRUD, specifically a SCRUD pattern that elevates query params to a more central role via the Search action.

Once we nailed down the API design pattern it was time to decide what language(s) our new APIs would be built upon. Our team has always been driven by the right tool for the job rather than what we know best. That said, in balancing practicality we chose to focus on 3 options that our team had deep experience with and knew the pros and cons of.

For us it came down to C#, JavaScript, and Ruby. At the time we owned our infrastructure, racks in cages, that were all loaded with Windows. We were also at a point that we were using that infrastructure to it's fullest and could not afford additional servers running Linux. That's a long way of saying we decided against Ruby as it doesn't play nice on Windows.

That left us with two options. We went a very unconventional route for deciding between the two. We built MVP APIs on both. The interfaces were identical and interchangeable. What we found was easily quantifiable differences.

We were able to iterate on our Node based APIs much more rapidly than we were our C# APIs. For us this was owed to the community coupled with the extremely dynamic nature of JS. There were tradeoffs we considered, latency was (acceptably) higher on requests to our Node APIs. No strong types to protect us from ourselves, but we've rarely found that to be an issue.

As such we decided to commit resources to our Node APIs and push it out as the core brain of our new system. We haven't looked back since. It has consistently met our needs, scaling with us, getting better with time as continually pour into and expand our capabilities.

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Thomas Miller
Talent Co-Ordinator at Tessian · | 16 upvotes · 72.4K views

In December we successfully flipped around half a billion monthly API requests from our Ruby on Rails application to some new Python 3 applications. Our Head of Engineering has written a great article as to why we decided to transition from Ruby on Rails to Python 3! Read more about it in the link below.

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Mike Fiedler
Enterprise Architect at Warby Parker · | 3 upvotes · 41.2K views

When I was evaluating languages to write this app in, I considered either Python or JavaScript at the time. I find Ruby very pleasant to read and write, and the Ruby community has built out a wide variety of test tools and approaches, helping e deliver better software faster. Along with Rails, and the Ruby-first Heroku support, this was an easy decision.

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Pros of Ruby
Pros of Stan
  • 598
    Programme friendly
  • 532
    Quick to develop
  • 488
    Great community
  • 466
    Productivity
  • 430
    Simplicity
  • 272
    Open source
  • 234
    Meta-programming
  • 203
    Powerful
  • 157
    Blocks
  • 138
    Powerful one-liners
  • 65
    Flexible
  • 56
    Easy to learn
  • 48
    Easy to start
  • 40
    Maintainability
  • 36
    Lambdas
  • 30
    Procs
  • 19
    Fun to write
  • 19
    Diverse web frameworks
  • 11
    Reads like English
  • 8
    Rails
  • 8
    Makes me smarter and happier
  • 7
    Elegant syntax
  • 6
    Very Dynamic
  • 5
    Programmer happiness
  • 5
    Matz
  • 4
    Generally fun but makes you wanna cry sometimes
  • 4
    Fun and useful
  • 3
    Friendly
  • 3
    Object Oriented
  • 3
    There are so many ways to make it do what you want
  • 2
    Easy packaging and modules
  • 2
    Primitive types can be tampered with
  • 2
    Elegant code
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    Cons of Ruby
    Cons of Stan
    • 7
      Memory hog
    • 7
      Really slow if you're not really careful
    • 3
      Nested Blocks can make code unreadable
    • 2
      Encouraging imperative programming
    • 1
      Ambiguous Syntax, such as function parentheses
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      What is Ruby?

      Ruby is a language of careful balance. Its creator, Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, blended parts of his favorite languages (Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp) to form a new language that balanced functional programming with imperative programming.

      What is Stan?

      A state-of-the-art platform for statistical modeling and high-performance statistical computation. Used for statistical modeling, data analysis, and prediction in the social, biological, and physical sciences, engineering, and business.

      Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

      What companies use Ruby?
      What companies use Stan?

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      What tools integrate with Ruby?
      What tools integrate with Stan?

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      Blog Posts

      Nov 20 2019 at 3:38AM
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      OneSignal

      PostgreSQLRedisRuby+8
      7
      3622
      Oct 24 2019 at 7:43PM
      https://img.stackshare.io/stack/513891/default_86b138c409d64e353c3d509121b4ac1dd9cf31c4.png logo

      AppSignal

      JavaScriptNode.jsJava+8
      5
      660
      Jun 6 2019 at 5:11PM
      https://img.stackshare.io/stack/372376/default_573a26a621134fbcbde85e58b2c8544189ae0fba.jpg logo

      AppSignal

      RedisRubyKafka+9
      15
      1043
      GitHubDockerReact+17
      32
      27033
      What are some alternatives to Ruby and Stan?
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      Interest over time
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