Node.js vs Phoenix Framework vs Rails

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Node.js

108.1K
88.8K
+ 1
8.3K
Phoenix Framework

718
792
+ 1
660
Rails

14.5K
9.9K
+ 1
5.4K
Advice on Node.js, Phoenix Framework, and Rails
Needs advice
on
Node.js
.NET Core
and
Django

Looking for Advice! I am developing a hybrid app for video streaming, I have a prior experience with .NET Core and would like to use it for my back end but the latest buzz on characteristics of Node.js such as light weight, event loop and Async capabilities is really tempting me to reconsider my decision. On a quick research I could observe that a lot of Internet companies use either Python Django or Node JS for their back end which has thrown me into confusion, looking for an expert advice, thx.

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Replies (4)
anas mattar
Technical Lead at DPO International · | 4 upvotes · 33.8K views
Recommends
.NET Core

That's depend on your experience if you are very well in C# you should start using the Technology that's you know and like it.

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So none of these tools may be bad for your implementation of this streaming app. But one thing to consider is what are you trying to achieve. If your application is more front end facing with streaming to a backend service C# may be your better implementation path just due to its greater overall versatility in terms of options for mobile, backend development, front end development, service development, etc... However if your focused purely on the streaming aspects and utilizing Amazon or Azure services in conjunction with the language of choice, Python, Node.Js, Django or other technologies may offer a faster option to success. Another thing to consider is many of the streaming platforms today utilize services from cloud vendors to achieve their success more than simply the ingenuity on the part of their internal staff's programming skills. Traditional programming languages like Java, C++, C# are used less these days. Today most teams are piggybacking off these services where its possible to give your application the greatest ability to compete with the big boys. - Your Friendly Neighborhood Tech Manager

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Aslam Mohammad
Systems Engineer at Infosys · | 1 upvotes · 23.2K views
Recommends
Node.js
Django

You could apparently go for both Node or Django but I would recommend choosing Node as you're building a video streaming app and the biggest video streaming service Netflix used Node in the production.

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Pavel Nekrasov
MyOpenTour at MyOpenTour · | 1 upvotes · 39 views
Recommends
fastapi
at

Take a look at FastAPI if you are going to choose Python

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
and
Laravel

What will be better Laravel or Node.js to handle a logistics portal which displays thousands (20-50k) of delivery data information in an interactive table (searchable, filterable), live delivery tracking, basic user management, and report creation?

Data comes usually in CSV (manually uploaded or via API from courier companies). Live tracking uses checks tracking numbers on the courier page using API.

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Replies (1)
Francis Rodrigues
FullStack JavaScript Developer at PanelADM · | 4 upvotes · 32.3K views
Recommends
Node.js
Laravel

My question for you is: "Which one are you familiar with?" Following your needs, both could do it, but think about it. Now talking about Node.js, in my opinion, if you use JavaScript, there are lots of packages to support your entire project, including native ones for testing TDD and others for BDD. Also the best support on AWS (Amazon Web Services) and GCP (Google Cloud Platform).

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Leonardo Viada
Project manager and web developer at Revo Digital · | 4 upvotes · 13.9K views
Needs advice
on
Scala
Rails
and
Play
at

In the past few months, a project we're working on grew up quite fast. Since we're adding more and more features, I'm considering migrating my Express/TS REST API towards a more solid and more "enterprise-like" framework. Since I am experienced with TypeScript but not so much with Rails nor Play (Scala), I'd like to have some advice on which one could provide the best development experience, and most importantly, the smoothest paradigm transition from the JS/TS world. I've worked on some personal project with Rails, but I've found the Ruby language really distant from what the TypeScript ecosystem and syntax are, whereas on the opposite - during the brief tours I've taken in the past weeks - it's been a pleasure coding in Scala. Obviously, there are some key differences between the two languages - and the two frameworks consequently - but despite all the ROR automation and ease of use I don't despise at all Scala's pragmatic and great features such as static typing, pattern matching, and type inference. So... Please help me out with the choice! Regards

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Replies (4)
ALESSIO SALTARIN
Master IT Architect at IBM · | 5 upvotes · 11.7K views

If you are comfortable with TypeScript, why not evolve to a C# ecosystem? Asp.Net Core + Entity Framework is a mature and well supported technology. As far as I can see in the enterprise market, the most adopted choice is still Java. So, maybe you may have a look to SpringBoot - and ultimately Quarkus.

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Kevin Emery
QE Systems Engineer at Discovery, Inc. · | 5 upvotes · 11.3K views
Recommends
Rails

I don't have the Scala experience to compare the two, but I can say that Ruby is a wonderful language. For procedural programming where you don't need a lot of concurrent execution threads, it's superior to Node.JS in my opinion. All of the concepts from Typescript have equivalent syntax in Ruby, but there are fewer symbols (e.g. () => { ... }); ) and more keywords (eg 'do ... end'). It's a very flexible language and allows for a lot of different approaches to how it's written, so coding standards and careful organization is important. In the long run, however, you'll find it quicker to debug than Node.JS and just as powerful.

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malekmfs
at Meam Software Engineering Group · | 3 upvotes · 4.6K views
Recommends
Scala
Rails

This is advice regardless of your background and requirements. The Play framework has a terrible and complicated design, don't risk it. I even suggest Spring and Kotlin over it! You can use Scala for small services and Data Engineering stuff and benefit optimizations and threading of JVM. RoR, on the other hand, has a huge development speed, which I believe is a big advantage cause you can handle performance bottlenecks later. Also, Scala has another downside, which is featureful in terms of OO and FP paradigms, which makes anyone write code freely with any personal style and makes it a problem in a team, Hence a coding style has to be defined if there would be Scala development team.

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Hosam Aly
Senior Software Engineer · | 3 upvotes · 4.2K views
Recommends
Scala
Rails
Play

If software performance is your top priority, then Scala/Play is probably best. If developer productivity is your top priority, then Ruby on Rails is the best choice in my opinion.

The Rails framework is batteries-included. The framework takes care of many things by default so that you don't have to. Logging, security, etc. It's also well-integrated; for example, controllers understand models out of the box. I had a better experience with RoR than with Play.

On the other hand, Scala and the JVM are more performant in general, so they can scale to serve more requests per second on the same hardware.

If you're considering serverless functions, then Scala is probably a better choice because it would be faster to load, giving you better economics.

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Decisions about Node.js, Phoenix Framework, and Rails

#rust #elixir So am creating a messenger with voice call capabilities app which the user signs up using phone number and so at first i wanted to use Actix so i learned Rust so i thought to myself because well its first i felt its a bit immature to use actix web even though some companies are using Rust but we cant really say the full potential of Rust in a full scale app for example in Discord both Elixir and Rust are used meaning there is equal need for them but for Elixir so many companies use it from Whatsapp, Wechat, etc and this means something for Rust is not ready to go full scale we cant assume all this possibilities when it come Rust. So i decided to go the Erlang way after alot of Thinking so Do you think i made the right decision?Am 19 year programmer so i assume am not experienced as you so your answer or comment would really valuable to me

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We choose Next.js for our React framework because it's very minimal and has a very organized file structure. Also, it offers key features like zero setups, automatic server rendering and code splitting, typescript support. Our app requires some loading time to process the video, server-side rendering will allow our website to display faster than client-side rending.

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Ing. Alvaro Rodríguez Scelza
Software Systems Engineer at Ripio · | 11 upvotes · 89K views

I was considering focusing on learning RoR and looking for a work that uses those techs.

After some investigation, I decided to stay with C# .NET:

  • It is more requested on job positions (7 to 1 in my personal searches average).

  • It's been around for longer.

  • it has better documentation and community.

  • One of Ruby advantages (its amazing community gems, that allows to quickly build parts of your systems by merely putting together third party components) gets quite complicated to use and maintain in huge applications, where building and reusing your own components may become a better approach.

  • Rail's front end support is starting to waver.

  • C# .NET code is far easier to understand, debug and maintain. Although certainly not easier to learn from scratch.

  • Though Rails has an excellent programming speed, C# tends to get the upper hand in long term projects.

I would avise to stick to rails when building small projects, and switching to C# for more long term ones.

Opinions are welcome!

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Pros of Node.js
Pros of Phoenix Framework
Pros of Rails
  • 1.4K
    Npm
  • 1.3K
    Javascript
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 1K
    High-performance
  • 791
    Open source
  • 480
    Great for apis
  • 471
    Asynchronous
  • 417
    Great community
  • 387
    Great for realtime apps
  • 292
    Great for command line utilities
  • 78
    Node Modules
  • 76
    Websockets
  • 65
    Uber Simple
  • 53
    Great modularity
  • 53
    Allows us to reuse code in the frontend
  • 38
    Easy to start
  • 33
    Great for Data Streaming
  • 29
    Realtime
  • 25
    Awesome
  • 23
    Non blocking IO
  • 16
    Can be used as a proxy
  • 15
    High performance, open source, scalable
  • 14
    Non-blocking and modular
  • 13
    Easy and Fun
  • 12
    Same lang as AngularJS
  • 11
    Easy and powerful
  • 10
    Future of BackEnd
  • 9
    Fast
  • 8
    Scalability
  • 8
    Cross platform
  • 8
    Fullstack
  • 7
    Mean Stack
  • 7
    Simple
  • 5
    Easy concurrency
  • 5
    Great for webapps
  • 5
    React
  • 4
    Friendly
  • 4
    Easy to use and fast and goes well with JSONdb's
  • 4
    Typescript
  • 4
    Fast, simple code and async
  • 3
    Its amazingly fast and scalable
  • 3
    Scalable
  • 3
    Great speed
  • 3
    Fast development
  • 3
    Isomorphic coolness
  • 3
    Control everything
  • 2
    It's fast
  • 2
    Not Python
  • 2
    Blazing fast
  • 2
    One language, end-to-end
  • 2
    TypeScript Support
  • 2
    Easy to learn
  • 2
    Javascript2
  • 2
    Easy to use
  • 2
    Less boilerplate code
  • 2
    Sooper easy for the Backend connectivity
  • 2
    Great community
  • 2
    Scales, fast, simple, great community, npm, express
  • 2
    Performant and fast prototyping
  • 1
    Easy
  • 1
    Lovely
  • 0
    Event Driven
  • 115
    High performance
  • 74
    Super fast
  • 69
    Rapid development
  • 60
    Open source
  • 60
    Erlang VM
  • 46
    Well designed
  • 43
    Channels
  • 37
    Easily Scalable
  • 35
    Restful
  • 35
    Very extensible
  • 11
    Functional Programming
  • 9
    Great community
  • 9
    Inspired by Rails
  • 8
    Beautiful code
  • 8
    Ecto
  • 6
    Scalable
  • 6
    Fault tolerant
  • 4
    Insanely fast and easy
  • 4
    Elegant
  • 4
    Feels like working with rails framework with more power
  • 3
    LiveView feature
  • 3
    Great integration with GraphQL
  • 3
    Benevolent dictator that decides project course
  • 2
  • 2
    Front-End Agnostic
  • 2
    Built-in websocket support
  • 1
    KK
  • 1
    Functional approach
  • 847
    Rapid development
  • 648
    Great gems
  • 604
    Great community
  • 479
    Convention over configuration
  • 416
    Mvc
  • 349
    Great for web
  • 344
    Beautiful code
  • 311
    Open source
  • 270
    Great libraries
  • 260
    Active record
  • 105
    Elegant
  • 88
    Easy to learn
  • 86
    Easy Database Migrations
  • 78
    Makes you happy
  • 73
    Free
  • 62
    Great routing
  • 53
    Has everything you need to get the job done
  • 41
    Great Data Modeling
  • 38
    Beautiful
  • 38
    MVC - Easy to start on
  • 35
    Easy setup
  • 26
    Great caching
  • 25
    Ultra rapid development time
  • 22
    It's super easy
  • 17
    Great Resources
  • 16
    Easy to build mockups that work
  • 14
    Less Boilerplate
  • 7
    Developer Friendly
  • 7
    API Development
  • 6
    Great documentation
  • 5
    Easy REST API creation
  • 5
    Quick
  • 4
    Great language
  • 4
    Intuitive
  • 4
    Haml and sass
  • 4
    Easy to learn, use, improvise and update
  • 2
    It works
  • 2
    Jet packs come standard
  • 2
    Easy and fast
  • 2
    Legacy
  • 2
    Metaprogramming
  • 1
    Convention over configuration
  • 1
    Easy Testing
  • 1
    Cancan
  • 1
    It's intuitive

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Cons of Node.js
Cons of Phoenix Framework
Cons of Rails
  • 46
    Bound to a single CPU
  • 40
    New framework every day
  • 34
    Lots of terrible examples on the internet
  • 28
    Asynchronous programming is the worst
  • 22
    Callback
  • 16
    Javascript
  • 11
    Dependency based on GitHub
  • 10
    Dependency hell
  • 10
    Low computational power
  • 7
    Can block whole server easily
  • 6
    Very very Slow
  • 6
    Callback functions may not fire on expected sequence
  • 3
    Unneeded over complication
  • 3
    Unstable
  • 3
    Breaking updates
  • 1
    No standard approach
  • 6
    No jobs
  • 5
    Very difficult
  • 20
    Too much "magic" (hidden behavior)
  • 13
    Poor raw performance
  • 11
    Asset system is too primitive and outdated
  • 6
    Bloat in models
  • 6
    Heavy use of mixins
  • 3
    Very Very slow

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

What is Phoenix Framework?

Phoenix is a framework for building HTML5 apps, API backends and distributed systems. Written in Elixir, you get beautiful syntax, productive tooling and a fast runtime.

What is Rails?

Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

What companies use Node.js?
What companies use Phoenix Framework?
What companies use Rails?

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What are some alternatives to Node.js, Phoenix Framework, and Rails?
AngularJS
AngularJS lets you write client-side web applications as if you had a smarter browser. It lets you use good old HTML (or HAML, Jade and friends!) as your template language and lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your application’s components clearly and succinctly. It automatically synchronizes data from your UI (view) with your JavaScript objects (model) through 2-way data binding.
PHP
Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
JavaScript
JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
React
Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.
See all alternatives
Reviews of Node.js, Phoenix Framework, and Rails
Ing. de Sistemas at bonsaiERP
Review of
Phoenix Framework

The Framework is new but has what it takes to take your apps to the next level, right now rails 5 is beta with ActionCable to make real time but I must say ruby isn't the right tool for doing real time but Elixir is really fast and has great concurrency and other erlang features.

Web Developer, Freelancer
Review of
Node.js

I have benchmarked Node.js and other popular frameworks using a real life application example. You can find the results here: https://medium.com/@mihaigeorge.c/web-rest-api-benchmark-on-a-real-life-application-ebb743a5d7a3

How developers use Node.js, Phoenix Framework, and Rails
StackShare uses
Rails

The first live version of Leanstack was actually a WordPress site. There wasn’t a whole lot going on at first. We had static pages with static content that needed to be updated manually. Then came the concept of user-generated content and we made the switch to a full on Rails app in November of last year. Nick had a lot of experience with Rails so that made the decision pretty easy. But I had also played around with Rails previously and was comfortable working with it. I also knew I’d need to hire engineers with a lot more experience building web apps than I do, so I wanted to go with a language and framework other people would have experience with. Also, the sheer number of gems and tools available for Rails is pretty amazing (shout to RubyToolbox ).

I don’t see us ever having to move away from Rails really, but I could be wrong. Leanstack was built in Rails 3. For StackShare we decided to upgrade to Rails 4. Biggest issue with that has been caching. DHH decided to remove the standard page and action caching in favor of key-based caching (source)[http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/caching_with_rails.html#page-caching]. Probably a good thing from a framework-perspective. But pretty shitty to have to learn about that after testing out your new app and realizing nothing is cached anymore :( We’ll need to spend some more time implementing "Russian Doll Caching", but for now we’ve got a random mixture of fragment and action caching (usually one or the other) based on which pages are most popular.

Karma uses
Rails

We use Rails for webpages and projects, not for backend services. Actually if you click through our website, you won't notice it but you're clicking though, I think, seven or eight different Rails projects. We tie those all together with a front-end library that we wrote, which basically makes sure that you have a consistent experience over all these different Rails apps.

It's a gem, we call it Karmeleon. It's not a gem that we released. It's an internal gem. Basically what it does is it makes sure that we have a consistent layout across multiple Rails apps. Then we can share stuff like a menu bar or footer or that kind of stuff.

So if we start a new front end project it's always a Rails application. We pull in the Karmeleon gem with all our styling stuff and then basically the application is almost ready to be deployed. That would be an empty page, but you would still have top bar, footer, you have some custom components that you can immediately use. So it kind of bootstraps our entire project to be a front end project.

MaxCDN uses
Node.js

We decided to move the provisioning process to an API-driven process, and had to decide among a few implementation languages:

  • Go, the server-side language from Google
  • NodeJS, an asynchronous framework in Javascript

We built prototypes in both languages, and decided on NodeJS:

  • NodeJS is asynchronous-by-default, which suited the problem domain. Provisioning is more like “start the job, let me know when you’re done” than a traditional C-style program that’s CPU-bound and needs low-level efficiency.
  • NodeJS acts as an HTTP-based service, so exposing the API was trivial

Getting into the headspace and internalizing the assumptions of a tool helps pick the right one. NodeJS assumes services will be non-blocking/event-driven and HTTP-accessible, which snapped into our scenario perfectly. The new NodeJS architecture resulted in a staggering 95% reduction in processing time: requests went from 7.5 seconds to under a second.

Trello uses
Node.js

The server side of Trello is built in Node.js. We knew we wanted instant propagation of updates, which meant that we needed to be able to hold a lot of open connections, so an event-driven, non-blocking server seemed like a good choice. Node also turned out to be an amazing prototyping tool for a single-page app. The prototype version of the Trello server was really just a library of functions that operated on arrays of Models in the memory of a single Node.js process, and the client simply invoked those functions through a very thin wrapper over a WebSocket. This was a very fast way for us to get started trying things out with Trello and making sure that the design was headed in the right direction. We used the prototype version to manage the development of Trello and other internal projects at Fog Creek.

AngeloR uses
Node.js

All backend code is done in node.js

We have a SOA for our systems. It isn't quite Microservices jsut yet, but it does provide domain encapsulation for our systems allowing the leaderboards to fail without affecting the login or education content.

We've written a few internal modules including a very simple api framework.

I ended up picking Node.js because the game client is entirely in JavaScript as well. This choice made it a lot easier for developers to cross borders between being "client side" game developers and "server side" game developers. It also meant that the pool of knowledge/best practices is applicable almost across the company.

Tony Manso uses
Node.js

Node.js is the foundation for the server. Using Express.js for serving up web content, and sockets.io for synchronizing communications between all clients and the server, the entire game runs as Javascript in Node.js.

I don't know how well this will scale if/when I have hundreds of people connected simultaneously, but I suspect that when that time comes, it may be just a matter of increasing the hardware.

As for why I chose Node.js... I just love JavaScript! My code is all original, meaning that I didn't have to inherit anyone's bad Javascript. I'm perfectly capable of creating my own bad Javascript, thank you! Also, npm rocks!

Tarun Singh uses
Node.js

Used node.js server as backend. Interacts with MongoDB using MongoSkin package which is a wrapper for the MongoDB node.js driver. It uses express for routing and cors package for enabling cors and eyes package for enhancing readability of logs. Also I use nodemon which takes away the effort to restart the server after making changes.

Instacart uses
Rails

Web has always been in Rails from the beginning, so we used Redis for caching our items, which we had, from the beginning. Rails is kind of what we were comfortable with, and we knew we wanted the front end to be really, really snappy, so we de-normalized all the item attributes into Redis, and that's how it got served out.

Tim Lucas uses
Rails

Rails 5 (beta 3) provided a nice structure for rendering responses, linking to front-end assets (compiled previously via Webpack), handling sessions w/ tailor made login links via an email button/token, background jobs, and creating an admin behind basic auth to allow managing of users and purchases.

Ngakkan Nyaagu uses
Rails

For this project rails was ideal due to new features introduced in Rails 5 that allowed us to build a lightweight "API only" project. Developer familiarity and the ability to rapidly iterate, as well as providing an accessible testing framework were additional factors.

Ryan Jennings uses
Phoenix Framework

framework that the app is built on

Bitödeme uses
Phoenix Framework

Bitödeme core app