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Advice on Meteor, Phoenix Framework, and Spring

Is learning Spring and Spring Boot for web apps back-end development is still relevant in 2021? Feel free to share your views with comparison to Django/Node.js/ ExpressJS or other frameworks.

Please share some good beginner resources to start learning about spring/spring boot framework to build the web apps.

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Replies (1)

Java in general, in my opinion, is somewhat outdated in 2021. C# is a better language, and therefore, I think ASP.NET (Core/.NET 5) should be used over it. Node.js isn't bad if you are getting started, or if you need to prototype an app. I use Node in production because of TypeScript, but .NET is a really good framework that has excellent performance.

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Needs advice
on
SpringSpring
and
Node.jsNode.js

I am provided with the opportunity to learn one of these technologies during my training. I have prior experience with Spring and found it tough and still haven't figured out when to use what annotations among the thousands of annotations provided. On the other hand, I am very proficient in Java data structures and algorithms (custom comparators, etc.)

I have used Node.js and found it interesting, but I am wondering If I am taking the risk of choosing a framework that has a comparatively lesser scope in the future. One advantage I see with the node.js is the number of tutorials available and the ease with which I can code.

Please recommend which path to take. Is Spring learnable, or should I spend my energy on learning Node.js instead?

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Replies (2)

I do not know Spring or your company/specialty. Of course it must be learnable and I won't tell you to give up on anything. Java is and will remain valuable.

Regardless, I don't think "lesser scope" is a valid strike against Node.js here. Node.js fulfills JavaScript's original vision of an everywhere language and can run anywhere that Java can. It serves webpages, communicates with hardware, powers command line tools, and builds desktop applications. A huge complexity-saver for teams running many environments (my biggest regret is that it cannot run a microcontroller).

Node.js' biggest practical weakness is that JavaScript is less structured than Java. Luckily, the large influx of Java developers has been helping with this: gaps like constants and private properties are gradually filling in, and TypeScript firms up the types to the point where JavaScript looks a lot like Java.

Probably more potential competition from the larger pool of JS developers, but the compensation is allegedly similar so I guess there is a similar supply/demand situation.

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Recommends

hi this depends where you want to advance . If you want to work for an big aged company with a lot of legacy go the spring way (banks, insurances netflix etc ) if you want to go the new agile fast cloud way learn node js it is much more suited for cloud and micro service even spring cloud can do that as well but it is much more heavier

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Needs advice
on
SpringSpring
and
DjangoDjango

I am a graduate student working as a software engineer in a company. For my personal development, I want to learn web development. I have some experience in Springboot while I was in university. So I want to continue with spring-boot, but I heard about Django. I'm reaching out to the experts here to help me choose a future proof framework. Django or Spring Boot?

Thanks in Advance

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Replies (5)
Recommends
SpringSpring

Kamrul Hasan, Don't choose dying technologies with small communities. How many startups do you think use Spring and Django? Use Google Trends to compare technologies. Study the StackOverflow developer survey and job websites to see what technologies are wanted. Few teams can afford to train you to get up to their level so be a life-long learner. Embrace the dawn of a new industry and become an expert.

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Sulaiman Sanusi
Recommends
SpringSpring

I recommend you stick to Java Spring as you already have experience with the technology, i suggest you master this technology and then if Django seam to be very interesting to you, django is a framework you can easily pickup as python is also easy, you have to probably be able to manage the context switching between a static typed language like Java to dynamic language like python

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Gonzalo Fernández
Recommends

Hi Kamrul,

It really depends on the kind of project and whether you feel more comfortable with Java or Python. Both are excellent frameworks, with a huge community and learning material. I've been working with Spring Boot since I started coding almost and I can assure you it's the perfect combination for Java. The learning curve may be harder that Django, but once you know the basics you're good to go. I can't tell you much about Django but you must now by now that it has a great reputation with Python users. In any case I don't think you can go wrong with any of these two. My advice is, if you are already familiar with the Spring framework, give Spring Boot a try, because you're going to find out that it just makes the whole Spring experience so much easier. Let us know what you chose!

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Christoph Becker
Recommends
SpringSpringDjangoDjango

It depends on what you want. Spring is Java-based whereas Django is Python-based. The question rather is Java vs Python. I personally recommend Python as it's shorter and easy to learn. But Java has advantages in really big systems.

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Recommends
DjangoDjango

Both are in active development and had huge community support. It really depends on you what you are comfortable with. Both are married to their respective languages. I choose Python over Java because of its simplicity and readability. To develop in java you need to write a lot of code. That's how java is. The best part I love with Django is its synchronization with Databases.

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Decisions about Meteor, Phoenix Framework, and Spring

#rust #elixir So am creating a messenger with voice call capabilities app which the user signs up using phone number and so at first i wanted to use Actix so i learned Rust so i thought to myself because well its first i felt its a bit immature to use actix web even though some companies are using Rust but we cant really say the full potential of Rust in a full scale app for example in Discord both Elixir and Rust are used meaning there is equal need for them but for Elixir so many companies use it from Whatsapp, Wechat, etc and this means something for Rust is not ready to go full scale we cant assume all this possibilities when it come Rust. So i decided to go the Erlang way after alot of Thinking so Do you think i made the right decision?Am 19 year programmer so i assume am not experienced as you so your answer or comment would really valuable to me

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Lucas Litton
Founder & CEO at Macombey · | 13 upvotes · 351.5K views

Next.js is probably the most enjoyable React framework our team could have picked. The development is an extremely smooth process, the file structure is beautiful and organized, and the speed is no joke. Our work with Next.js comes out much faster than if it was built on pure React or frameworks alike. We were previously developing all of our projects in Meteor before making the switch. We left Meteor due to the slow compiler and website speed. We deploy all of our Next.js projects on Vercel.

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This basically came down to two things: performance on compute-heavy tasks and a need for good tooling. We used to have a Meteor based Node.js application which worked great for RAD and getting a working prototype in a short time, but we felt pains trying to scale it, especially when doing anything involving crunching data, which Node sucks at. We also had bad experience with tooling support for doing large scale refactorings in Javascript compared to the best-in-class tools available for Java (IntelliJ). Given the heavy domain and very involved logic we wanted good tooling support to be able to do great refactorings that are just not possible in Javascript. Java is an old warhorse, but it performs fantastically and we have not regretted going down this route, avoiding "enterprise" smells and going as lightweight as we can, using Jdbi instead of Persistence API, a homegrown Actor Model library for massive concurrency, etc ...

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Pros of Meteor
Pros of Phoenix Framework
Pros of Spring
  • 252
    Real-time
  • 200
    Full stack, one language
  • 183
    Best app dev platform available today
  • 155
    Data synchronization
  • 152
    Javascript
  • 118
    Focus on your product not the plumbing
  • 107
    Hot code pushes
  • 106
    Open source
  • 102
    Live page updates
  • 92
    Latency compensation
  • 39
    Ultra-simple development environment
  • 29
    Real time awesome
  • 29
    Smart Packages
  • 23
    Great for beginners
  • 22
    Direct Cordova integration
  • 16
    Better than Rails
  • 15
    Less moving parts
  • 13
    It's just amazing
  • 10
    Blaze
  • 8
    Great community support
  • 8
    Plugins for everything
  • 6
    One command spits out android and ios ready apps.
  • 5
    0 to Production in no time
  • 5
    It just works
  • 4
    Coding Speed
  • 4
    Easy deployment
  • 4
    Is Agile in development hybrid(mobile/web)
  • 4
    You can grok it in a day. No ng nonsense
  • 2
    One Code => 3 Platforms: Web, Android and IOS
  • 2
    AngularJS Integration
  • 2
    Easy yet powerful
  • 2
    Community
  • 1
    Real time
  • 1
    Hookie friendly
  • 1
    High quality, very few bugs
  • 1
    Easy Setup
  • 1
    Free
  • 1
    Friendly to use
  • 1
    Stack available on Codeanywhere
  • 1
    Nosql
  • 117
    High performance
  • 75
    Super fast
  • 69
    Rapid development
  • 60
    Erlang VM
  • 60
    Open source
  • 45
    Well designed
  • 43
    Channels
  • 37
    Easily Scalable
  • 35
    Very extensible
  • 35
    Restful
  • 11
    Functional Programming
  • 9
    Great community
  • 9
    Inspired by Rails
  • 8
    Beautiful code
  • 8
    Ecto
  • 6
    Scalable
  • 6
    Fault tolerant
  • 4
    Insanely fast and easy
  • 4
    Elegant
  • 4
    Feels like working with rails framework with more power
  • 3
    LiveView feature
  • 3
    Great integration with GraphQL
  • 3
    Benevolent dictator that decides project course
  • 2
  • 2
    Front-End Agnostic
  • 2
    Built-in websocket support
  • 1
    KK
  • 1
    Functional approach
  • 224
    Java
  • 155
    Open source
  • 133
    Great community
  • 120
    Very powerful
  • 112
    Enterprise
  • 63
    Lot of great subprojects
  • 59
    Easy setup
  • 44
    Convention , configuration, done
  • 38
    Standard
  • 29
    Love the logic
  • 12
    Good documentation
  • 10
    Stability
  • 10
    Dependency injection
  • 7
    MVC
  • 6
    Easy
  • 3
    Strong typing
  • 3
    Makes the hard stuff fun & the easy stuff automatic
  • 2
    Maven
  • 2
    Code maintenance
  • 2
    Best practices
  • 2
    Great Desgin
  • 2
    Easy Integration with Spring Security
  • 2
    Integrations with most other Java frameworks
  • 1
    Java has more support and more libraries
  • 1
    Supports vast databases
  • 1
    Large ecosystem with seamless integration
  • 1
    OracleDb integration
  • 1
    Live project

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Meteor
Cons of Phoenix Framework
Cons of Spring
  • 4
    Hard to debug issues on the server-side
  • 4
    Heavily CPU bound
  • 4
    Does not scale well
  • 6
    No jobs
  • 5
    Very difficult
  • 15
    Draws you into its own ecosystem and bloat
  • 3
    Verbose configuration
  • 3
    Poor documentation
  • 3
    Java
  • 2
    Java is more verbose language in compare to python

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

What is Meteor?

A Meteor application is a mix of JavaScript that runs inside a client web browser, JavaScript that runs on the Meteor server inside a Node.js container, and all the supporting HTML fragments, CSS rules, and static assets.

What is Phoenix Framework?

Phoenix is a framework for building HTML5 apps, API backends and distributed systems. Written in Elixir, you get beautiful syntax, productive tooling and a fast runtime.

What is Spring?

A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.

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What are some alternatives to Meteor, Phoenix Framework, and Spring?
React
Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.
Angular 2
It is a TypeScript-based open-source web application framework. It is a development platform for building mobile and desktop web applications.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
Django
Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
ASP.NET
.NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications.
See all alternatives