MariaDB vs MySQL

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

MariaDB

10K
7.4K
+ 1
467
MySQL

75.6K
59.8K
+ 1
3.7K
Add tool

MariaDB vs MySQL: What are the differences?

MariaDB: An enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Started by core members of the original MySQL team, MariaDB actively works with outside developers to deliver the most featureful, stable, and sanely licensed open SQL server in the industry. MariaDB is designed as a drop-in replacement of MySQL(R) with more features, new storage engines, fewer bugs, and better performance; MySQL: The world's most popular open source database. The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.

MariaDB and MySQL can be categorized as "Databases" tools.

"Drop-in mysql replacement", "Great performance" and "Open source" are the key factors why developers consider MariaDB; whereas "Sql", "Free" and "Easy" are the primary reasons why MySQL is favored.

MariaDB and MySQL are both open source tools. MySQL with 3.97K GitHub stars and 1.56K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than MariaDB with 2.82K GitHub stars and 864 GitHub forks.

Airbnb, Uber Technologies, and Netflix are some of the popular companies that use MySQL, whereas MariaDB is used by Grooveshark, Shutterstock, and Geocodio. MySQL has a broader approval, being mentioned in 2991 company stacks & 3049 developers stacks; compared to MariaDB, which is listed in 496 company stacks and 461 developer stacks.

Advice on MariaDB and MySQL
Needs advice
on
PostgreSQL
MySQL
and
MongoDB

I'm planning to build a freelance marketplace website, using tools like Next.js, Firebase Authentication, Node.js, but I need to know which type of database is suitable with performance and powerful features. I'm trying to figure out what the best stack is for this project. If anyone has advice please, I’d love to hear more details. Thanks.

See more
Replies (3)
malekmfs
at Meam Software Engineering Group · | 6 upvotes · 24.2K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

Postgres and MySQL are very similar, but Mongo has differences in terms of storage type and the CAP theorem. For your requirement, I prefer Postgres (or MySQL) over MongoDB. Mongo gives you no schema which is not always good. on the other hand, it is more common in NodeJS community, so you may find more articles about Node-Mongo stuff. I suggest to stay with RDBMS if possible.

See more
Ruslan Rayanov
Recommends
MySQL

We have a ready-made engine for the online exchange and marketplace. To customize it, you only need to know sql. Connecting any database is not a problem. https://falconspace.site/list/solutions

See more
Recommends
PostgreSQL
MySQL

This is a little about experience. Postgresql is fine. You can use either the related table structure or the json table structure.

See more
View all (3)
Dimelo Waterson
Needs advice
on
SQLite
PostgreSQL
and
MySQL

I need to add a DBMS to my stack, but I don't know which. I'm tempted to learn SQLite since it would be useful to me with its focus on local access without concurrency. However, doing so feels like I would be defeating the purpose of trying to expand my skill set since it seems like most enterprise applications have the opposite requirements.

To be able to apply what I learn to more projects, what should I try to learn? MySQL? PostgreSQL? Something else? Is there a comfortable middle ground between high applicability and ease of use?

See more
Replies (3)
Recommends
SQLite

You can easily start with SQlite. Really easy to startup since it doesn't require you to install any additional software since is self-contained. It has interfaces in almost any language and also GUIs. Start learning SQL basics and simpler data models and structures. There are many tutorials, also available in the official website. From there you will easily migrate to another database. MySQL could be next, sonce it's easier to learn at first and has more resources available. PostgreSQL is less widespread, more challenging and has the fewer resorces, but once you have some experience with MySQL is really easy to learn as well. All these technologies are really widespread and used accross the industry so you won't make a wrong decision with any of these.

See more
Stephen Badger | Vital Beats
Senior DevOps Engineer at Vital Beats · | 6 upvotes · 37.7K views

A question you might want to think about is "What kind of experience do I want to gain, by using a DBMS?". If your aim is to have experience with SQL and any related libraries and frameworks for your language of choice (python, I think?), then it kind of doesn't matter too much which you pick so much. As others have said, SQLite would offer you the ability to very easily get started, and would give you a reasonably standard (if a little basic) SQL dialect to work with.

If your aim is actually to have a bit of "operational" experience, in terms of things like what command line tools might be available as standard for the DBMS, understanding how the DBMS handles multiple databases, when to use multiple schemas vs multiple databases, some basic privilege management etc. Then I would recommend PostgreSQL. SQLite's simplicity actually avoids most of these experiences, which is not helpful to you if that is what you hope to learn. MySQL has a few "quirks" to how it manages things like multiple databases, which may lead you to making less good decisions if you tried to take your experience over to different DBMS, especially in bigger enterprise roles. PostgreSQL is kind of a happy middle ground here, with the ability to start PostgreSQL servers via docker or docker-compose making the actual day-to-day management pretty easy, while still giving you experience of the kinds of considerations I have listed above.

At Vital Beats we make use of PostgreSQL, largely because it offers us a happy balance between good management and backup of data, and good standard command line tools, which is essential for us where we are deploying our solutions within Kubernetes / docker, and so more graphical tools are not always appropriate for us. PostgreSQL is also pretty universally supported in terms of language libraries and frameworks, without having to make compromises on how we want to store and layout our data.

See more
Julien DeFrance
Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 1 upvotes · 29.8K views
Recommends
MySQL

MySQL's very popular, easy to install, is also available as a managed service across most popular cloud offerings. The support/default tooling (such as MySQL Query Workbench) certainly is a little more baked than what you'll find for Postgres.

https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/workbench/

See more
View all (3)
Maxim Ryakhovskiy
Needs advice
on
PostgreSQL
Mongoose
and
MariaDB

Hi all. I am an informatics student, and I need to realise a simple website for my friend. I am planning to realise the website using Node.js and Mongoose, since I have already done a project using these technologies. I also know SQL, and I have used PostgreSQL and MySQL previously.

The website will show a possible travel destination and local transportation. The database is used to store information about traveling, so only admin will manage the content (especially photos). While clients will see the content uploaded by the admin. I am planning to use Mongoose because it is very simple and efficient for this project. Please give me your opinion about this choice.

See more
Replies (7)
malekmfs
at Meam Software Engineering Group · | 4 upvotes · 45.7K views

Your requirements seem nothing special. on the other hand, MongoDB is commonly used with Node. you could use Mongo without defining a Schema, does it give you any benefits? Also, note that development speed matters. In most cases RDBMS are the best choice, Learn and use Postgres for life!

See more

The use case you are describing would benefit from a self-hosted headless CMS like contentful. You can also go for Strapi with a database of your choice but here you would have to host Strapi and the underlying database (if not using SQLite) yourself. If you want to use Strapi, you can ease your work by using something like PlanetSCaleDB as the backing database for Strapi.

See more
Nutchanon Ninyawee

SQL is not so good at query lat long out of the box. you might need to use additional tools for that like UTM coordinates or Uber's H3.

If you use mongoDB, it support 2d coordinate query out of the box.

See more
Tarun Batra
Back End Developer at instabox · | 2 upvotes · 38.6K views
Recommends
Mongoose

MongoDB and Mongoose are commonly used with Node.js and the use case doesn't seem to be requiring any special considerations as of now. However using MongoDB now will allow you to easily expand and modify your use case in future.

If not MongoDB, then my second choice will be PostgreSQL. It's a generic purpose database with jsonb support (if you need it) and lots of resources online. Nobody was fired for choosing PostgreSQL.

See more
Recommends
Mongoose

Any database will be a great choice for your app, which is less of a technical challenge and more about great content. Go for it, the geographical search features maybe be actually handy for you.

See more
Ruslan Rayanov
Recommends

Hi, Maxim! Most likely, the site is almost ready. But we would like to share our development with you. https://falcon.web-automation.ru/ This is a constructor for web application. With it, you can create almost any site with different roles which have different levels of access to information and different functionality. The platform is managed via sql. knowing sql, you will be able to change the business logic as necessary and during further project maintenance. We will be glad to hear your feedback about the platform.

See more
Václav Hodek
CEO, lead developer at Localazy · | 1 upvotes · 39K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

Any database engine should work well but I vote for Postgres because of PostGIS extension that may be handy for travel related site. There's nothing special about your requirements.

See more
View all (7)
Decisions about MariaDB and MySQL
Sergey Rodovinsky

At Pushnami we were looking at several alternative databases that would support following architectural requirements: - very quick prototyping for an unknown domain - ability to support large amounts of data - native ability to replicate and fail over - full stack approach for Node.js development After careful consideration MongoDB came on top, and 3 years later we are still very happy with that decision. Currently we keep almost 2TB of data in our cluster, and start thinking about sharding.

See more
Omran Jamal
CTO & Co-founder at Bonton Connect · | 4 upvotes · 171.8K views

We actually use both Mongo and SQL databases in production. Mongo excels in both speed and developer friendliness when it comes to geospatial data and queries on the geospatial data, but we also like ACID compliance hence most of our other data (except on-site logs) are stored in a SQL Database (MariaDB for now)

See more
Kyle Harrison
Web Application Developer at Fortinet · | 11 upvotes · 248.2K views

MySQL has a lot of strengths working for it. It's simple and easy to set up and use. It's JSON engine is also really good these days. Mongo is also simple to setup and use, and it's speed as a document-object storage engine is first class.

Where Postgres has both beat is in it's combining of all of the features that make both MySQL and Mongo great, while adding on enterprise grade level scalability and replication. It's Postgres' stability and robustness, while still fulfilling the roles of it's contemporaries extremely well that edge Postgre for me.

See more
Get Advice from developers at your company using Private StackShare. Sign up for Private StackShare.
Learn More
Pros of MariaDB
Pros of MySQL
  • 149
    Drop-in mysql replacement
  • 100
    Great performance
  • 74
    Open source
  • 54
    Free
  • 44
    Easy setup
  • 15
    Easy and fast
  • 14
    Lead developer is "monty" widenius the founder of mysql
  • 6
    Also an aws rds service
  • 4
    Learning curve easy
  • 4
    Consistent and robust
  • 2
    Native JSON Support / Dynamic Columns
  • 1
    Real Multi Threaded queries on a table/db
  • 790
    Sql
  • 673
    Free
  • 557
    Easy
  • 527
    Widely used
  • 485
    Open source
  • 180
    High availability
  • 158
    Cross-platform support
  • 103
    Great community
  • 78
    Secure
  • 75
    Full-text indexing and searching
  • 25
    Fast, open, available
  • 14
    SSL support
  • 13
    Reliable
  • 13
    Robust
  • 8
    Enterprise Version
  • 7
    Easy to set up on all platforms
  • 2
    NoSQL access to JSON data type
  • 1
    Replica Support
  • 1
    Easy, light, scalable
  • 1
    Relational database
  • 1
    Sequel Pro (best SQL GUI)

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of MariaDB
Cons of MySQL
    Be the first to leave a con
    • 14
      Owned by a company with their own agenda
    • 1
      Can't roll back schema changes

    Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

    What is MariaDB?

    Started by core members of the original MySQL team, MariaDB actively works with outside developers to deliver the most featureful, stable, and sanely licensed open SQL server in the industry. MariaDB is designed as a drop-in replacement of MySQL(R) with more features, new storage engines, fewer bugs, and better performance.

    What is MySQL?

    The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.

    Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

    What companies use MariaDB?
    What companies use MySQL?
    See which teams inside your own company are using MariaDB or MySQL.
    Sign up for Private StackShareLearn More

    Sign up to get full access to all the companiesMake informed product decisions

    What tools integrate with MariaDB?
    What tools integrate with MySQL?

    Sign up to get full access to all the tool integrationsMake informed product decisions

    Blog Posts

    Dec 8 2020 at 5:50PM

    DigitalOcean

    +11
    2
    1705
    +6
    2
    1472
    +17
    32
    28379
    +42
    53
    19599
    +44
    109
    49842
    What are some alternatives to MariaDB and MySQL?
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL is an advanced object-relational database management system that supports an extended subset of the SQL standard, including transactions, foreign keys, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions.
    Percona
    It delivers enterprise-class software, support, consulting and managed services for both MySQL and MongoDB across traditional and cloud-based platforms.
    Oracle
    Oracle Database is an RDBMS. An RDBMS that implements object-oriented features such as user-defined types, inheritance, and polymorphism is called an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS). Oracle Database has extended the relational model to an object-relational model, making it possible to store complex business models in a relational database.
    MongoDB
    MongoDB stores data in JSON-like documents that can vary in structure, offering a dynamic, flexible schema. MongoDB was also designed for high availability and scalability, with built-in replication and auto-sharding.
    Cassandra
    Partitioning means that Cassandra can distribute your data across multiple machines in an application-transparent matter. Cassandra will automatically repartition as machines are added and removed from the cluster. Row store means that like relational databases, Cassandra organizes data by rows and columns. The Cassandra Query Language (CQL) is a close relative of SQL.
    See all alternatives
    Reviews of MariaDB and MySQL
    Review of
    MariaDB

    MySQL was founded by Allan Larsson, Michael Widenius and David Axmark in the year 1995, 19 years ago. It was released under the name of co-founder Michael Widenius daughter, ‘My‘. This project was released under GNU General Public License as well as under certain Proprietary License. MySQL was owned by MySQL AB firm until it went into the hands of Oracle Corporation. It is written in Programming Language – C and C++ and is available for Windows, Linux, Solaris, MacOS and FreeBSD.

    In the year 2009, Michael Widenius started working on MarisDB as a fork of MySQL. In the year 2012 the bricks of nonprofit MariaDB Foundation was laid. It was named after the founder’s daughter Maria.

    MariaDB is a fork of MySQL Relational Database Management System which again is released under GNU General Public License. It is written in Programming Language – C, C++, Perl and Bash and is available for Systems Linux, Windows, Solaris, MacOS and FreeBSD.

    How developers use MariaDB and MySQL
    Rajeshkumar T uses
    MySQL
    • We are used MySQL database to build the Online Food Ordering System

      • Its best support normalization and all joins ( Restaurant details & Ordering, customer management, food menu, order transaction & food delivery).
      • Best for performance and structured the data.
      • Its help to stored the instant updates received from food delivery app ( update the real-time driver GPS location).
    Srinivas Adireddi uses
    MySQL

    1.It's very popular. Heared about it in Database class 2. The most comprehensive set of advanced features, management tools and technical support to achieve the highest levels of MySQL scalability, security, reliability, and uptime. 3. MySQL is an open-source relational database management system. Its name is a combination of "My", the name of co-founder Michael Widenius's daughter, and "SQL", the abbreviation for Structured Query Language.

    ShadowICT uses
    MySQL

    We use MySQL and variants thereof to store the data for our projects such as the community. MySQL being a well established product means that support is available whenever it is required along with an extensive list of support articles all over the web for diagnosing issues. Variants are also used where needed when, for example, better performance is needed.

    shridhardalavi uses
    MySQL

    MySQL is a freely available open source Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) that uses Structured Query Language (SQL). SQL is the most popular language for adding, accessing and managing content in a database. It is most noted for its quick processing, proven reliability, ease and flexibility of use.

    John Galbraith uses
    MySQL

    I am not using this DB for blog posts or data stored on the site. I am using to track IP addresses and fully qualified domain names of attacker machines that either posted spam on my website, pig flooded me, or had more that a certain number of failed SSH attempts.

    Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) uses
    MariaDB

    Aside from Redis, we use MariaDB to store long-term information like user-data and big-data like regeneration-information for our open-world servers. We extensively use the relational aspects of MariaDB in joins, nested queries and unions.

    Seungkwon Park uses
    MariaDB

    mysql보다 mariaDB가 join면에서 우수하다는 문서를 읽었습니다. 이 부분은 저의 블로그에서도 다뤘고 저의 word press 블로그는 mysql 대신 mariaDB 를 사용합니다.

    특히 limit 기능이 pagenation 처리를 할 때 너무 직관적이고 편해서 mariaDB, mysql을 사랑합니다.

    Ana Phi Sancho uses
    MariaDB

    Introduced in computer science course.managing relational database management systems, database analytics, and for data processing

    nrise uses
    MariaDB

    수 백만개가 넘는 태그 키워드의 자동완성을 위해서 별도의 데이터베이스를 구축하였습니다. MariaDB 는 MySQL 을 포크한 프로젝트입니다. MySQL 과의 강력한 호환성을 지니며, 큰 튜닝 없이 강력한 성능을 보장합니다.

    Dolls Kill uses
    MariaDB

    MariaDB has allowed us to easily scale out our DB cluster. Also has better replication tools than MySQL