JavaScript vs Rust

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JavaScript vs Rust: What are the differences?

Developers describe JavaScript as "Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions". JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. On the other hand, Rust is detailed as "A safe, concurrent, practical language". Rust is a systems programming language that combines strong compile-time correctness guarantees with fast performance. It improves upon the ideas of other systems languages like C++ by providing guaranteed memory safety (no crashes, no data races) and complete control over the lifecycle of memory.

JavaScript and Rust belong to "Languages" category of the tech stack.

"Can be used on frontend/backend" is the top reason why over 1556 developers like JavaScript, while over 81 developers mention "Guaranteed memory safety" as the leading cause for choosing Rust.

Rust is an open source tool with 37.3K GitHub stars and 5.85K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Rust's open source repository on GitHub.

Airbnb, Instagram, and ebay are some of the popular companies that use JavaScript, whereas Rust is used by Dropbox, Sentry, and Roundscope Ukraine Labs. JavaScript has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5080 company stacks & 6471 developers stacks; compared to Rust, which is listed in 39 company stacks and 105 developer stacks.

Advice on JavaScript and Rust
Needs advice
on
C#C#JavaScriptJavaScript
and
KotlinKotlin

Hello everybody,

I'm Syed, recently graduated from university. I studied C++ as the first programming language and later I have (a little) experience working with C#. I also have a basic understanding of Kotlin, JavaScript and Python. As of today, I am studying Kotlin from https://developer.android.com/.

Please give me some tips about my career. Which language should I choose in today's modern era? Whether I go with Web development or work on Android app development. Thank you for your assistance.

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Replies (1)

Hi Syed, I wish you all the best. I'm an experienced programmer with more than 15 years of experience. Recently in my company, we were trying to hire a MERN Full-Stack developer and we found many who can code in React but few who were capable of thinking logically and actually able to solve the business problem. Learn any language or package, but keep in mind to learn for a goal. Syntaxes don't matter, we hire to achieve goals. Small to medium companies, usually hire full-stack developers due to the lack of resources. So it would be great to learn the following: For Web, I would suggest "React", and for mobile development, "Flutter" comes in handy with lots of promising future. How about learning both? much better but it's all about you. Good luck!

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Needs advice
on
GolangGolangPerlPerl
and
RustRust

I intend to use a programming language which I'll use as AWS runtime and write a script that will comb through tons of files in a directory and its subdirectories and search for simple text regular expressions and process and write the matches in a file as output. I have heard that Perl is good for regex based search but I also want the performance to be good as it will have to go through tons of files for IO. In this post: https://filia-aleks.medium.com/aws-lambda-battle-2021-performance-comparison-for-all-languages-c1b441005fd1, I see that Rust works well as AWS Lambda runtime with very good performance. Which one should I choose as my AWS lambda runtime for this problem? Golang is also an option as it is fast as per the above link.

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Replies (1)
Recommends

I used to work in a Perl shop and must admit that the language is very simple for tasks like these, but as you mentioned it's not fast at execution time. I'm now a Go programmer professionally but I taught myself the language while in college purely out of interest and eventually found my way to the job, not the other way around. I've recently been learning a little rust because of how much that language comes up in conversations around Go. I find the concept of the borrow checker nice but I have to admit I feel lost like I am in most flavors of new fancy framework js. That's not to say Rust is really anything like js, but the learning appears the same to me as someone who's convinced they could learn just about any programming language if it was necessary (over time I've seen procedural, OOP, declarative and functional stuff but never programming logic outside of the prolog code I wrote in school).

Go isn't made for your specific task at hand but it's a very easy language to pick up and it has good directory traversal standard library code and good regex (even though with time perl's has been optimized to be faster and I think it's written in C++) but more than anything Go is "cloud native" programming in that an awful lot of new microservice tech stacks are centered around it, docker and kubernetes are written in it, and there's a thriving community whose focus is generally web-first and performance-oriented. This means for your use case there might already be a large cohort of gophers that have asked the stackoverflow questions for you

I personally would push you towards the NYT Profiler for Perl before I would towards Rest, but that's because I know you wouldn't waste any time being able to get to the task at hand and then make it go faster, and I expect all but a few rustaceans would be able to do so with the same speed.

Whatever you pick I wish you the very best of luck!

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Needs advice
on
ElixirElixir
and
RustRust

I've been working with Js/Ts as a backend developer and I would like to get some suggestions about what new language to learn right now. I've been thinking about Elixir or Rust, focusing on creating WebApis and Blockchain technology. I am passionate about the funcional way but I'm now confident about Elixir in Blockchain. Rust seems like have more jobs about it than Elixir in a little research. Someone could give me some advice? Thank you.

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Replies (2)
Cristian Carreno
Lead Backend Software Engineer at Suda Outdoors · | 7 upvotes · 12.3K views
Recommends
ElixirElixirGolangGolang

For web development I would suggest to take a look into Elixir. Elixir is extemely good for real time apps through websockets, apps with a need of high concurrency and / or apps where you need to process hundreds of thousands of states of differents users in parallel thanks to the actor model that comes with Erlang virtual machine. To solve these kind of problems in another stack could be really hard and painful (including your current stack).

It's true that Elixir is a niche stack ( It deserves way more popularity in my opinion), so, if your concern is to learn something that would keep you inside the trend and market, instead of Rust or Elixir I would suggest Go. Go it's another outstanding language, will a lot of virtues, small and easy to learn, with it for example, you could compile the same application to different operating systems just with a special compiler command (And the compiler is blazing fast). You can also start with a lot of good libraries that helps you to keep your code clean and under control and of course, it's performance is very good too.

Hope my suggestions could be helpful.

Best regards, and happy coding!

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Tyrone Wilson
Lead Developer at Black Swan Data · | 7 upvotes · 11.5K views
Recommends
GolangGolang

Golang is to my mind by far the greatest bang for your buck in terms of investing your time it has a low barrier to entry. Elixir is fun and all, but it is VERY VERY niche. You are very unlikely to find a job directly requiring Elixir. Rust is a good option depending on what you want to achieve but golang is a great general-purpose language that has a very approachable learning curve, great documentation and a lot of jobs available. There are some very high profile projects written in golang. Docker, Kubernetes, InfluxDB and Grafana just to name a few. I was at this same junction at the end of 2018 having spent a lot of time in JS/TS & Ruby. I had already learned Elixir and done a couple of projects in it and I switched to Golang as I didn't want to learn niche languages. I have never regretted my choice. Obviously, every tool has its place but golang is a winner if you want to learn something new :)

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Paul Morgan
Researcher at Working on it · | 25 upvotes · 49.5K views
Needs advice
on
JavaScriptJavaScriptPythonPython
and
ReactReact

Hey everyone, I have a matrix chart drawn in HTML5/CSS 3 dominantly using CSS grid. I would like to add interactive features and am unsure about the best tool. My programming knowledge is limited to 2 semesters of Java in college, so I'd have to learn the language as I go. I am open to anything, but the selected languages would be useful in future projects.

Here are the features I am attempting to add to the site linked as my blog:

  • Assign over 120 attributes each to over 400 elements (probably in a DB)

  • Procedurally position elements in a matrix chart based on user-inputted filters (filtering and searching)

  • Procedurally position matrix elements based on attributes weighted by user-input

  • Change style of elements based on user input (highlighting)

  • Allow saving matrix chart states to be revisited or shared

  • Provide a user-friendly interface for users to submit the above input

  • Build several columns or matrices that are separate but related and seamless to the viewer

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Replies (5)

PyCharm + Python + Flask + Jinja2 is enough to build web server/ajax and JavaScript + JQuery (maybe React). You can write small easy application but also extreme high scalable application.

I know Java but it need 4x time more code and code is not clear (too much forced use of @decorators) - too complex and takes more memory :)

Remember if you code in Python it is easy to code in Java but if you code in Java you must understand that Python is much more flexible and powerful - also easier to learn.

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There are two main facets to interactivity - whether your frontend (Javacsript, HTML, CSS) is programmed to behave dynamically based on events and on any other preprogrammed behavior, and based on what information your server can send and receive and compute for the benefit of your frontend. For the former (a dynamic frontend) you'll need to use Javascript (or Typescript) in some form. For the latter (a server with custom behavior and data endpoints beyond just sending static HTML etc. files), any of the major languages can serve this purpose. However, if you are going to create a dynamic frontend with Javascript and don't know that language at all, then learning it will be a task in itself, and without knowing a backend language well either (probably the case with only two semesters of one language a while back), you ideally don't want to also have to learn a whole other backend language on top of that. That's where NodeJS comes in. It has essentially the same exact syntax as frontend Javascript (just different native libraries). Since you already need to learn Javascript to make the frontend behave dynamically, if you also want a custom backend, NodeJS will spare you a big learning curve on top of the existing learning curve of learning JS. NodeJS is also highly performant for low-compute high-volume requests, i.e. handling a large barrage of requests if each doesn't require a lot of complicated behavior on the backend. A lot of coding bootcamps teach this, commonly called "full stack JS", for this reason - it allows someone to learn a constellation of full stack web development skills from the mastery of one language syntax. NodeJS + ExpressJS is also one of the easiest backend languages + REST API library to use to build a backend. Look up "NodeJS Express Hello World", and you'll be shocked at how easy it is to build a basic server. As far as frontend frameworks go, if this project is very limited in scope, JQuery could be fine, but I'd highly recommend learning React for something more involved - it will be immensely easier to manage and maintain, and generally lends itself to much better and more intuitive code organization. Its use of components will also be somewhat familiar and intuitive from the object oriented programming you learned through Java. Create React App is great tool to use, especially when first learning React, to avoid all of the finicky nonsense in configuring transpilation etc.

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Recommends
ReactReact

React is hands-down the tool I recommend to add interactivity to your matrix. Because it is Javascript, it will leverage a lot of the formatting from Java. Python would be very foreign to you. React shines in allowing you to use OOP principles within the JavaScript language and it is really powerful, fast and browser friendly.

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Recommends

Use Javascript alongwith HTML CSS and you have complete set of application ready (even for future for PWA or bundled applications).

You can use charts.js library https://www.chartjs.org/ or https://apexcharts.com/javascript-chart-demos/. You can find many examples, you can have a look at https://codepen.io/ksarpotdar/pen/NWyqqZM?editors=0010

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Recommends
JavaScriptJavaScript

Ok. Clearly you forgot the best tool to give for interactive features. JavaScript! In particular I recommend the freeCodeCamp JavaScript course. Here it is.

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Needs advice
on
JavaScriptJavaScript
and
PythonPython

I am unhappy. When doing my research, I heard Python is useless. Data science is an unworthy field thanks to TensorFlow, and web scraping has also become pointless since the introduction of the PWA. Since PWAs are only frontend, I feel forced to learn JavaScript, and to ditch Python. I love Python with all my mind, it's simplicity, conciseness, and easiness as a tool. Here are a few questions:

  1. Should I forget Python and move on?
  2. Are there any PWA alternatives to JavaScript/TypeScript. I've been thinking of using Python for WASM and use HTML+CSS for the DOM to create the PWA. Is this possible?
  3. Why is JavaScript such a pain in the butt
  4. What's the point of me learning Python if it's not useful for web development?
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Replies (4)
Christophe Vermeulen
Engineer Counselor at IBPT · | 8 upvotes · 21.9K views
Recommends
PythonPython

You should not ditch or forget Python because of what you hear or because of one particular project. It's probably going to stay relevant and useful for the coming 20 years. If you're a programmer, you should however be prepared to use several tools, and programming languages are just part of the toolbox (like HTML or CSS, but also your IDE, powershell, linux commands, etc.) It's not for nothing that this site is called "stackshare".

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Adam Bouqdib
Software Engineer, Entrepreneur at ABE Media · | 6 upvotes · 20.7K views
Recommends
GolangGolang

Python is great for data science but it's not very performant and eats up loads of resources. I recommend that you give Go a go. It's easy to learn and very fast!

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Recommends

JavaScript is reduced Python. Python is powerful. If Python is not powerful you can mix it with C/C++ - this is not available in JavaScript in easy way. I am programmer and electrical engineer too - I think for research Python is the best thing. JavaScript is better for Web. I code in both very good.

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Recommends

Python is definitely not useless, It has a ton of usecases, with a huge community behind it, but not that performant and consumes lots of resources, I don't think you should abandon it, and PWA is kind a in its early stage, so I doubt that there will be any language better than js for developing it any time soon, so I guess there are no alternatives, but I guess you will like js/ts if you spend a little more time playing with it, and the same goes for wasm it is also in its early stage, and i guess web assembly and rust will be used a lot for that, and lets say you have built a frontend web app , now with the help of python + django or flask you can write server code, and learn a little bit about databases, then bravo you are a full stack dev.

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Needs advice
on
C langC lang
and
RustRust

When working on Python, I noticed that Python is only useful for data science. I am looking for a programming language that:

  • Is different in terms of paradigm(I used OO only in Python for data analysis, I want something that is a different paradigm to improve my coding skills)

  • Is excellent at systems engineering

  • Will enhance my Python projects and basically make Python better

  • Has an excellent future, will skyrocket in terms of demand

  • Is very performant, excellent performance

  • Has a steep learning curve(it's because I want a simple language and an advanced language in my stack)

I found these two languages to fit my needs, and I need help choosing. Which would be better for me considering my needs

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Replies (2)
Jayson Pamittan
Full Stack Developer at Synchronosure · | 2 upvotes · 13.1K views
Recommends
RustRust

Rust is more useful compared to C on some cases like in web assembly. C is more tedious to code. Rust is modern and has a lot more of opportunities. If you are also investing for the future I recommend Rust over C.

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Recommends
RustRust

It must be Rust, It absorbs the advantages of other languages,safe, good performance and develop quickly, The community is also growing and active. I think there are some difficulties to learn Rust, but when you have mastered it, you will write good programs than C lang

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fisher boy
Intern web developer at Stepway · | 9 upvotes · 62.8K views
Needs advice
on
CSS 3CSS 3HTML5HTML5
and
JavaScriptJavaScript
in

Hey I'm currently an undergraduate in computer science for almost 5 years now, still left with a few courses before I complete. I know that I'm not good at programming but still I choose developer based programming career approach, I have made plans to start my career in websites, etc, for that, I have purchased books related to HTML5, CSS , JavaScript. I'm currently learning HTML5 and CSS only and after this some JavaScript I am really confident in my decision but would love to know what an expert developer advice thanks in advance.

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Replies (7)

Whatever you do don't go WordPress path. Developers over-there tend to ignore system limitations and hardcode and overengineer their solutions so as to please their clients. If you are a beginner probably you'll get to work on someone else's shitty code and will be asked by your boss to do "yet another impossible thing with Wordpress". And... Probably... You'll do it.

My suggestion is: think in stacks and don't start too low. Starting with HTML, CSS3 and JavaScript is too low. Start on higher levels and with something practical. You'll have time for basics some time later and it would be much easier, because you'll see those technologies are compliment to what you do and not your main objective.

My suggestion for you:

  • Android Mobile App Development path (complex enough so you won't get bored)
  • All things web3 crypto, nft, virtual reality, blockchain path (has tons of computing web development tasks)
  • Cloud computing setup and administration path (good, because you say you're not good at programming)
  • Artificial intelligence and automation (this is future, people need this)

I've also found it helpful to think of each stack as a surface (find Google Images "radar chart") . Every time you try to learn something new you start in the center, with all technology-points overlapping. You are as low as you can get and you know nothing. Your job is to expand outwards each technology so as to make a stack-surace. The more surface the better. You'll see that some technological-aspects are easier to expand than others and plan your time accordingly.

Have a good start!

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You can also try starting with one of the big marketing agencies. Even if you don't feel like you're ready to start as a web developer (you likely are, though, they hire at all levels) you can start as a content author or similar supporting role until you're more comfortable, then transition into a development role within the same company when you're ready.

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Shanover Saiyed
Software Engineer (Web) · | 4 upvotes · 12.6K views
Recommends
SvelteSvelteVue.jsVue.js

I would recommend you to learn these quickly and get on learning a good front-end framework like Vue, ReactJs, Svelte. Pick up real world projects not just learn from books. Always keep learning about the new technologies used to develop things because IT Web development tools and their approach is growing faster than ever, you have got to keep up with those new techs and tools. Final advise, open any job portal, find your targeted job and see what requirements are their.

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Jose Vargas
Recommends
JavaScriptJavaScript

JavaScript is an ever growing technology with lots of opportunities and great depth for both front end and back end development. I would say that JavaScript is a safe bet in terms of furthering your career as a developer in 2022 and beyond. There’s lots of tools and frameworks based on this language that you would have to make decisions on which ones you want to become an expert. I recommend you follow interesting people that you admire to draw inspiration from. Such as Ben Awad or Jeff Delaney. Check this web page recommended to me by the latter on his YouTube channel “Fireship”: https://2021.stateofjs.com/en-US/resources/

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Recommends

I don't believe that you are confident about your decision to follow a career path as a developer. This migh be your department's fault and not necessarily yours. Most good developers are already working as developers at that age. Although your current status states that you are an intern you are struggling to find a good starting point. Since you are interested in website developmnet you can start learning programming using a mainstream CMS such as wordpress. Do you know how many companies and self employed guys make their living by customizing wordpess? But if you want to step out of the crowd then seek for junior jobs on a fintech or on a vertical market such as travel or betting. Search for online job oportunities and find out what technologies these guys use then take an online course and start learning the language. Within a month or two apply for a job as a junior and use as reference the online course.

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Recommends

JS + HTML + CSS only tackles the front-end of programming. I suggest you can start to learn by finding an open API related to something you love and then creating a website for it. (E.g. movies, documentaries, music, whatever you are into) Also you can do this dude's tutorials https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtKciwk_si4

Later on, when you've already one a few projects, start to learn the backend side of things (database + whatever you want - C#, Python...)

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Recommends

this article might help you. Web development is a combination of skills. not only developing skills but also SEO and other stuff. codehub.lk/web-development-skills-you-must-have/

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Needs advice
on
ASP.NETASP.NETJavaScriptJavaScript
and
Node.jsNode.js

I am about to complete my graduation with a computer science background. I want to pursue my career in software development. My front-end knowledge is very poor. I didn't like PHP so I didn't go for Laravel. My university offers a course on ASP.NET, I liked C# that's why I took asp.net. But now I think .net tech is unnecessarily complicated and most of the job offers available for .net are not for freshers. Should I try js and Node.js now? I mean as a fresher which tech stack should I choose for web development(Backend)?

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Replies (2)
Anthony Chiboucas
Software Engineer & Support Operations Lead · | 5 upvotes · 36.7K views

Just don't .NET. It was a failed idea from the start. Node and javascript are easier to learn, with much wider adoption, and more active communities.

.NET is an old experiment in using a markup language to separate the UI from the business logic. The idea was that this would allow a small team of hyper-competent engineers to build the tooling and code for a large team of less-skilled front-end developers to leverage. In practice, leveraging that customized UI markup requires understanding and adjusting the underlying code. The result is that any UI change requires a hyper-competent .NET engineer.

However, many larger companies bought into it a long time ago, and now have a hard dependency on old monolithic .NET ecosystems, and they do need .NET developers to maintain them.

So, you can get a well paying .NET job without much difficulty. However, you'll neither like it, nor be doing anything interesting. There's no growth here, only a very long slow death of .NET (that'll probably take another 20 years).

Node and Javascript are sticking around, and still growing.

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Mahmoud Gabr
Software engineer at AlgoDriven · | 4 upvotes · 37K views
Recommends
ASP.NETASP.NET

What I can see, you are confusing yourself, if you studied .Net now it's better to work as .Net developer, and you will find opportunities as fresh. Just search and don't waste your time. After you get more experience in .Net, then you can learn NodeJS if you still need to learn it.

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Needs advice
on
CSS 3CSS 3JavaScriptJavaScript
and
ReactReact

Hi, I learned some skills like HTML & CSS and JavaScript. Now I am learning React but sometimes I feel that I'm not good enough in the skills that I learned before although I make projects by any skills I learned. Every moment I feel that I need to be perfect and I know it's a wrong feel. Now I try to know How can I determine that I have the basis of any skills that I learn I mean that When can I move from learning completing tutorials to learning according to my requirement.

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Replies (4)

I admire your hard work for learning new technologies, but I would definitely recommend you to go out there, find internships and then learn by doing. There is not too much you can learn just from the tutorials, there are other important factors that you need to be a good programmer, you need to communicate, and do projects according to the liking of the client/project manager.

I would say it again, go out there and find internships to gain experience.

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Build a relatively more complicated project. Probably a solution for a problem you might facing rn. Take a few months to build it. Get yourself stuck in the bugs. Try to get outta that bugs. Don't worry about that imperfect feelings. Even senior devs go to Stackoverflow to seek help. And most importantly, finish the project, and don't give it up in the middle of the journey.

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Recommends
JavaScriptJavaScript

I think with anything related to personal development is about comfort zone management. Being too comfortable one can feel bored, too outside ones comfort zone one may feel out of their depth. I'm sure there's more to this down the rabbit hole of psychology. However I found learning about motivation and striking the right balance of extending myself has truly helped keep me pushing forward at a steady pace. In the end do projects that are motivate you whilst incorporating learning as you go. So pick a project that you know is possible, that you can achieve if you put the work and effort in, and that the outcome of it will be as you expect. I think even the perfectionist in you will find that satisfying.

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Jef Kalashnikov
Recommends

I was in your situation 6 months ago. I was well experienced in HTML, CSS, JS and NodeJS but wanted to learn React too.

What really got me going was doing one project for my customer. It was a good basis to learn React in a real environment and it got me rolling.

I can only advice you to do some REAL projects, not a a tutorial to-do list application of sorts: these won't teach you around hard stuff to handle as they are very controlled.

Go out there, create a real application for a business or as an intern somewhere. :)

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Sadie Flick
Needs advice
on
JavaJavaJavaScriptJavaScript
and
PythonPython

Generally speaking, what are the most important things you expect a junior developer to know and be able to do from day 1 in your respective tech stack? Firm grasp of OOP? SQL? MVC? ORM? Algorithms and Datastructures? Understanding CRUD & the request response cycle? Database design? framework familiarity? Postman? Deployment? TDD? Git? Language-specific knowledge? Other things?

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Replies (5)
Prashant Singh Ahluwalia
Head of Engineering - AIOps at Microsoft · | 13 upvotes · 100.9K views
Recommends
at

Start with building a solid understanding of computer science fundamentals. Understand the basics of building blocks - memory, processing, storage, networking. Understand what CPU bound, memory bound, I/O bound, network bound processes are. Understand the cost of accessing data from Memory vs. Disk vs Network. Understand how multiple CPU threads help in optimizing the performance of a single machine.

Build expertise on a programming language. You may pick any language of your choice. I would recommend starting with Java / Python. Make sure you know one language really well. Build a strong understanding of Data Structures and Algorithms. You should be able to develop an intuition on when to use what. You may practice DS and Algorithm problems, using the language of your choice, on a competitive coding platform (e.g. Leetcode) or by building your own App!

Next, get familiar with basic cloud computing and distributed system concepts. Here is a good resource for that - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7NkTUyEE1o&ab_channel=JeffreyRichter If you understand the computer science fundamentals well, you will be able to apply those concepts here as well.

Hope it helps!

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Recommends

Ability to read code and willingness to try to reason flow of operations and information. Tools and technologies change, one doesn't need to have them in toolbelt from day one. All things you name are relevant in some contexts, so it's not bad to understand them.

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Luan Himmlisch
Recommends

Just learn to learn. Learn to search and develop your logical thinking, that's all you need. No books, no deep study of how computers work, just logic and willingness to learn

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Recommends

For me, it is less of a specific technology you know (although I would prefer you have some knowledge of some of my team stack). It is more the way you get into a problem, the eagerness to learn more, the true sincerity to say "I don't know", the open mind to find solutions in different ways and the "Yes we can" mentality no matter how hard it is.

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Recommends

Most employers don't expect from you to know how to implement CI/CD or any other funcy stuff. As junior developer you should focus on building a good toolset of good software practices & principles. Your soft skills are important as well. Learn about soft skills. Be eager to learn, be humble and show you talent and your creativity through your work. If you want to become a good developer ( at first) and a star engineer (at a later stage) then computer programming (coding) is your number one priority . Coding is like painting. Putting aside your talent, you have to practice a lot and improve your outcome each time. As junior developer you can learn how to write good code by studying existing code found in public git repositories (i e , github). As junior developer you should study some good software principles (i.e., DRY, KISS, YAGNI) and always recall them each time you write software code. As junior developer you should learn about coding standards and conventions. You will have to follow to your company's coding conventions (soon or later) as well as you will realize that you have to write code cosistent to the existing code base. At the end of the day, code consistency matters a lot. You have to improve your code day by day. If you manage to follow some good software practices you will find out that you will need an ORM to work with your database. Then you will realize that you need the X web framework to build your REST API etc. To sum up, you will start building a toolset with a single programming language and some good software practices & principles and then you will put new tools in it day-by-day.

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Decisions about JavaScript and Rust
Jacob M
Brand Director at NCINTEV · | 15 upvotes · 60.1K views

I’m well aware of the hate that php receives and some of it is well warranted. But the ease of implementation for so many features that I find myself needed on a daily basis is head and shoulders above what I could achieve with JavaScript on my backend. I can do more without the need of frameworks but I still have many options if I want that. Especially with database handling I find many of the complainants about php to be pure rhetoric.

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We chose Rust for our web API because the Warp crate makes it easy to compose high-performance and asynchronous APIs. Rust allows us to achieve high development velocity because it provides zero-cost abstractions and enforces strict type and memory-safety checks with high quality and actionable error messages.

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Python will be used in order to train machine learning models from our data. We chose python for this task because it is the most common language for machine learning. It has very performant libraries like numpy and scikit-learn that provide functionality for manipulating data and creating models that you cannot get in other languages like JavaScript and Java. Additionally, it is the most familiar language for us to use for machine learning because almost every machine learning course teaches ml using python.

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Javascript will be used for both our frontend and backend on the web service. JavaScript is ubiquitous as the language to use for the frontend. For the backend, we decided to create our server using JavaScript because of its easy setup; using Express we can create a server in just a few short lines of code. It is simple not only to run the server locally, but to host it as well because any major service will support the language. JavaScript is a simple language to code in and familiar among our team members, so using it will help speed up development. Using JavaScript allows us to use NodeJS and npm, so we can use packages to easily set up the server, connect to a database and other convenient utilities. We also considered Python for our server. It is also very simple to create a server in Python, especially using flask. However, the extra familiarity with the JavaScript language and the ease of using packages were enough for us to pick JavaScript as our language of choice.

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Python: The top language in machine learning area because of the various open-source libraries. Our company will rely on open-source libraries for development as well.

Amazon EC2: Training machine learning model needs to be running on independent 3rd party computing resources. AWS EC2 can provide a variety of virtual computing resources based on what users need.

React+Javascript: React is popular and everyone in the team is familiar with it. React is an open-source JavaScript library that is used for building user interfaces specifically for single-page applications.

ExpressJS: Everyone in the team has used expressJS for development. It can create server-side web applications faster and smarter.

Amazon RDS: relational database service and free to use

Postman: Tool for the team to test API endpoint.

Circle CI: is lightweight and open. Therefore for faster deployment jobs, one can execute their codes on CircleCI as it deploys on scalable and robust cloud servers.

Docker: Easily pack, ship, and run any application as a lightweight, portable, self-sufficient container, which can run virtually anywhere

Github+Git: Julian is from Github so no other choice for us 😎

Slack: Everyone likes it and it's free

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Python: Top one language in machine learning area because of the various open source libraries. Our company will rely on the open source libraries for development as well.

Amazon EC2: Training machine learning model needs to be ran on independent 3rd party computing resources. AWS EC2 can provide variety of virtual computing resources based on what users need.

React+Javascript: React is popular and everyone in the team is familiar with it. React is an open-source JavaScript library that is used for building user interfaces specifically for single-page applications.

ExpressJS: Everyone in the team has used expressJS for development. It can create server-side web applications faster and smarter.

Amazon RDS: relational database service and free to use

Postman: Tool for the team to test API end point.

Circle CI: is lightweight and open. Therefore for faster deployment jobs, one can execute their codes on CircleCI as it deploys on scalable and robust cloud servers.

Docker: Easily pack, ship, and run any application as a lightweight, portable, self-sufficient container, which can run virtually anywhere

Github+Git: Julian is from Github so no other choice for us 😎

Slack: Everyone likes it and it's free

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2 major challenges for which JS comes as a handy tool, 1st its integration with AWS SDK was at par as Python and .net and the solution comes to hand with the reverse proxy solutions for the application to be running as an instance taking the situation of inside organization demography of resources expertise over the technology.

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Gabor Galazzo

As a startup, we need the maximum flexibility and the ability to reach our customers in a more suitable way. So a hybrid application approach is the best because it allows you to develop a cross-platform application in a unique codebase. The choice behind Ionic is Angular, I think that angular is the best framework to develop a complex application that needs a lot of service interaction, its modularity forces you (the developer) to write the code in the correct way, so it can be maintainable and reusable.

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Alexandre Desroches
Founder & Developper at Finance D · | 71 upvotes · 218.1K views

I had a goal to create the simplest accounting software for Mac and Windows to help small businesses in Canada.

This led me to a long 2 years of exploration of the best language that could provide these features:

  • Great overall productivity
  • International wide-spread usage for long-term sustainability and easy to find documentation
  • Versatility for creating websites and desktop softwares
  • Enjoyable developper experience
  • Ability to create good looking modern UIs
  • Job openings with this language

I tried Python, Java, C# and C++ without finding what I was looking for.

When I discovered Javascript, I really knew it was the right language to use. Thinking of this today makes me realize even more how great a decision this has been to learn, use and master Javascript. It has been a fun, challenging and productive road on which I am still satisfied.

Obviously, when I refer to Javascript, it is not without implying the vast ecosystem around it. For me, JS is a whole universe in which almost every imaginable tools exist. It's awesome - for real. Thanks to all the contributors which have made it possible.

To be even clearer about how intense I am with Javascript, let's just say that my first passion was music. Until, I find coding with Javascript! Yep, I know!

So in conclusion, I chose Javascript because it is versatile, enjoyable, widely used, productive for both desktop softwares and websites with ability to create modern great looking user interfaces (assuming HTML and CSS are involved) and finally there are job openings.

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Leonardo Henrique da Paixão
Student, Trainee QA Tester at SolarView Business · | 11 upvotes · 67.8K views

Simple Customer Registration Crud, with the functions of Register, Delete, Edit and List new and old customers registered in the Database. PostgreSQL was used as DBMS, due to its easy use and practicality.

Crud de Cadastro a Clientes simples, com as funções de Registrar, Deletar, Editar e Listar novos e antigos clientes cadastrado no Banco de Dados. Foi utilizado como SGBD o PostgreSQL, pelo seu facil uso e praticidade.

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Pros of JavaScript
Pros of Rust
  • 1.6K
    Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 1.5K
    It's everywhere
  • 1.1K
    Lots of great frameworks
  • 891
    Fast
  • 739
    Light weight
  • 421
    Flexible
  • 388
    You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
  • 286
    Non-blocking i/o
  • 235
    Ubiquitousness
  • 189
    Expressive
  • 53
    Extended functionality to web pages
  • 46
    Relatively easy language
  • 44
    Executed on the client side
  • 28
    Relatively fast to the end user
  • 23
    Pure Javascript
  • 19
    Functional programming
  • 12
    Async
  • 10
    Setup is easy
  • 10
    Full-stack
  • 9
    Because I love functions
  • 9
    Its everywhere
  • 8
    Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
  • 8
    JavaScript is the New PHP
  • 8
    Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
  • 7
    Expansive community
  • 7
    Future Language of The Web
  • 6
    Love-hate relationship
  • 6
    Easy
  • 6
    For the good parts
  • 6
    Everyone use it
  • 6
    Easy to hire developers
  • 6
    Evolution of C
  • 6
    Supports lambdas and closures
  • 6
    Agile, packages simple to use
  • 6
    Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
  • 5
    Powerful
  • 5
    Most Popular Language in the World
  • 5
    Its fun and fast
  • 5
    No need to use PHP
  • 5
    Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
  • 5
    Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
  • 5
    Versitile
  • 4
    What to add
  • 4
    Clojurescript
  • 4
    Function expressions are useful for callbacks
  • 4
    Everywhere
  • 4
    Hard not to use
  • 4
    Promise relationship
  • 4
    Scope manipulation
  • 4
    Client processing
  • 4
    Easy to make something
  • 4
    Nice
  • 4
    It's fun
  • 4
    Stockholm Syndrome
  • 4
    Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
  • 4
    It let's me use Babel & Typescript
  • 4
    Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
  • 4
    1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 3
    Because it is so simple and lightweight
  • 3
    Only Programming language on browser
  • 0
    Easy to understand
  • 137
    Guaranteed memory safety
  • 125
    Fast
  • 83
    Open source
  • 75
    Minimal runtime
  • 69
    Pattern matching
  • 61
    Type inference
  • 55
    Concurrent
  • 54
    Algebraic data types
  • 45
    Efficient C bindings
  • 43
    Practical
  • 37
    Best advances in languages in 20 years
  • 29
    Fix for C/C++
  • 29
    Safe, fast, easy + friendly community
  • 23
    Stablity
  • 22
    Closures
  • 21
    Zero-cost abstractions
  • 19
    Extensive compiler checks
  • 18
    Great community
  • 15
    No NULL type
  • 14
    Async/await
  • 14
    Completely cross platform: Windows, Linux, Android
  • 13
    No Garbage Collection
  • 12
    Great documentations
  • 12
    High-performance
  • 11
    Super fast
  • 11
    High performance
  • 10
    Generics
  • 10
    Safety no runtime crashes
  • 10
    Fearless concurrency
  • 9
    Guaranteed thread data race safety
  • 9
    Compiler can generate Webassembly
  • 9
    Helpful compiler
  • 8
    Easy Deployment
  • 8
    Prevents data races
  • 8
    Macros
  • 7
    Painless dependency management
  • 7
    RLS provides great IDE support
  • 6
    Real multithreading
  • 4
    Good package management
  • 4
    Support on Other Languages

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of JavaScript
Cons of Rust
  • 21
    A constant moving target, too much churn
  • 20
    Horribly inconsistent
  • 14
    Javascript is the New PHP
  • 8
    No ability to monitor memory utilitization
  • 6
    Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
  • 5
    Can be ugly
  • 4
    Thinks strange results are better than errors
  • 2
    No GitHub
  • 1
    Slow
  • 25
    Hard to learn
  • 23
    Ownership learning curve
  • 10
    Unfriendly, verbose syntax
  • 4
    High size of builded executable
  • 4
    Variable shadowing
  • 4
    Many type operations make it difficult to follow
  • 3
    No jobs

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is Rust?

Rust is a systems programming language that combines strong compile-time correctness guarantees with fast performance. It improves upon the ideas of other systems languages like C++ by providing guaranteed memory safety (no crashes, no data races) and complete control over the lifecycle of memory.

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Jobs that mention JavaScript and Rust as a desired skillset
CBRE
United States of America Massachusetts Boston
CBRE
United States of America Texas Richardson
CBRE
United States of America Texas Richardson
CBRE
United States of America Texas Richardson
CBRE
United States of America Massachusetts Boston
Pinterest
San Francisco, CA, US; New York City, NY, US; Portland, OR, US; Seattle, WA, US
What companies use JavaScript?
What companies use Rust?
See which teams inside your own company are using JavaScript or Rust.
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What tools integrate with JavaScript?
What tools integrate with Rust?

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Blog Posts

May 6 2020 at 6:34AM

Pinterest

JavaScriptC++Varnish+6
4
2889
JavaScriptGitHubReact+12
5
3803
Nov 20 2019 at 3:38AM

OneSignal

PostgreSQLRedisRuby+8
8
4208
Oct 24 2019 at 7:43PM

AppSignal

JavaScriptNode.jsJava+8
5
828
Oct 11 2019 at 2:36PM

LogRocket

JavaScriptReactAngularJS+8
5
1763
Oct 3 2019 at 7:13PM

Ably Realtime

JavaScriptPythonNode.js+8
4
3388
What are some alternatives to JavaScript and Rust?
TypeScript
TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
Dart
Dart is a cohesive, scalable platform for building apps that run on the web (where you can use Polymer) or on servers (such as with Google Cloud Platform). Use the Dart language, libraries, and tools to write anything from simple scripts to full-featured apps.
CoffeeScript
It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell in an effort to enhance JavaScript's brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and de-structuring assignment.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
See all alternatives