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Dropwizard vs Spring: What are the differences?

Developers describe Dropwizard as "Java framework for developing ops-friendly, high-performance, RESTful web services". Dropwizard is a sneaky way of making fast Java web applications. Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, light-weight package that lets you focus on getting things done. On the other hand, Spring is detailed as "Provides a comprehensive programming and configuration model for modern Java-based enterprise applications". A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.

Dropwizard and Spring can be primarily classified as "Frameworks (Full Stack)" tools.

"Quick and easy to get a new http service going" is the primary reason why developers consider Dropwizard over the competitors, whereas "Java" was stated as the key factor in picking Spring.

Dropwizard and Spring are both open source tools. It seems that Spring with 30.1K GitHub stars and 19.2K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Dropwizard with 7.23K GitHub stars and 3.04K GitHub forks.

MIT, Zillow, and Bodybuilding.com are some of the popular companies that use Spring, whereas Dropwizard is used by Yammer, Opower, and ClassPass. Spring has a broader approval, being mentioned in 316 company stacks & 179 developers stacks; compared to Dropwizard, which is listed in 51 company stacks and 12 developer stacks.

Advice on Dropwizard and Spring
Needs advice
on
Spring BootSpring Boot
and
SpringSpring

Hello Guys

I am a newbie here and not very well experienced with different stacks. I have primarily programmed in C lang/C++ and am somewhat proficient in it.

I am now considering taking up Spring as a new framework to learn to get into Web dev as I know a little Java. But I have concerns about choosing it and am confused with JavaScript frameworks.

Could you please tell me which stack should I choose from?

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Replies (2)
Recommends
QuarkusQuarkus

What is your objective here? It sounds like this is not to solve a particular issue, but is about learning? If so, do you have a preference for things used on the front-end or the backend? That decision would typically lead down a JAVA-oriented path or a JavaScript-oriented path.

If you decide to learn JAVA, then Spring + Spring-boot is a very relevant framework. A competitor is Microprofile + Quarkus. The Quarkus part is newer, but gaining a lot of traction.

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Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

Javascript is not a framework, it's programming language that can run in browser or as server side application developed with node.js framework.

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Needs advice
on
SpringSpringRailsRails
and
DjangoDjango
in

Hi everyone! I'm starting a personal project that I've been postponing for a little while and I'm starting with the backend first.

  • It's an app that needs to query open APIs (It could go up to a hundred APIs) and do filtering and other manipulations onto the data and then store it in my own database. So basically, the end result medium/long term is a lot of data!

  • Besides filtering/storing data from other APIs, the API will interact with my client application. I should note that the client app attempts to give real-time information.

Question: I would want to launch the API within 6 months as I'm also planning to make it available for other devs through platforms like RapidAPI. With all being said, my question is twofold:

  1. Which backend framework would allow me to do these operations with the best response time possible?

  2. Which framework would be the easiest to deal with deployment on AWS?

Background:

I have a background in Spring since I'm using it at work, I have none in Rails and Django but I don't mind trying something new as long as the learning curve isn't crazy. I know python but not Ruby. Beginner on AWS and choose that one after some research.

Thank you very much, sorry it was a bit long. Cheers

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Replies (1)
Jorge Velasco
Full Stack Developer at Fintual · | 8 upvotes · 11.3K views

The most relevant part is the central architecture more than the specific backend. For me, it makes sense to go for an event-driven solution. In this case, an event is emitted on every new data, and one or more listeners react to it. In AWS, you can easily get this by storing your data in DynamoDB, which is pretty fast, and have as many lambdas working on the received data (here you can find more details). This way, you keep your worker(s) busy fetching data while others consolidate it. I wouldn't get too crazy on the lambdas, and I'd start with one as there will be only one client by your description. My only concern is how similar the APIs you're consuming are. Depending on that, it may be easier to have different lambdas by target API. My only note on the backend language is that if you want low latency, I'd discard Python and Ruby and choose Go (I know that is not in the list, but given that you're open to learning a new language, you could give it a try). It is easy to learn, has excellent performance, and is the only Lamdba runtime with an X (1.X) in the supported language, making it a great choice.

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Is learning Spring and Spring Boot for web apps back-end development is still relevant in 2021? Feel free to share your views with comparison to Django/Node.js/ ExpressJS or other frameworks.

Please share some good beginner resources to start learning about spring/spring boot framework to build the web apps.

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Replies (1)

Java in general, in my opinion, is somewhat outdated in 2021. C# is a better language, and therefore, I think ASP.NET (Core/.NET 5) should be used over it. Node.js isn't bad if you are getting started, or if you need to prototype an app. I use Node in production because of TypeScript, but .NET is a really good framework that has excellent performance.

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Needs advice
on
SpringSpring
and
Node.jsNode.js

I am provided with the opportunity to learn one of these technologies during my training. I have prior experience with Spring and found it tough and still haven't figured out when to use what annotations among the thousands of annotations provided. On the other hand, I am very proficient in Java data structures and algorithms (custom comparators, etc.)

I have used Node.js and found it interesting, but I am wondering If I am taking the risk of choosing a framework that has a comparatively lesser scope in the future. One advantage I see with the node.js is the number of tutorials available and the ease with which I can code.

Please recommend which path to take. Is Spring learnable, or should I spend my energy on learning Node.js instead?

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Replies (2)

I do not know Spring or your company/specialty. Of course it must be learnable and I won't tell you to give up on anything. Java is and will remain valuable.

Regardless, I don't think "lesser scope" is a valid strike against Node.js here. Node.js fulfills JavaScript's original vision of an everywhere language and can run anywhere that Java can. It serves webpages, communicates with hardware, powers command line tools, and builds desktop applications. A huge complexity-saver for teams running many environments (my biggest regret is that it cannot run a microcontroller).

Node.js' biggest practical weakness is that JavaScript is less structured than Java. Luckily, the large influx of Java developers has been helping with this: gaps like constants and private properties are gradually filling in, and TypeScript firms up the types to the point where JavaScript looks a lot like Java.

Probably more potential competition from the larger pool of JS developers, but the compensation is allegedly similar so I guess there is a similar supply/demand situation.

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Recommends

hi this depends where you want to advance . If you want to work for an big aged company with a lot of legacy go the spring way (banks, insurances netflix etc ) if you want to go the new agile fast cloud way learn node js it is much more suited for cloud and micro service even spring cloud can do that as well but it is much more heavier

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Needs advice
on
SpringSpring
and
DjangoDjango

I am a graduate student working as a software engineer in a company. For my personal development, I want to learn web development. I have some experience in Springboot while I was in university. So I want to continue with spring-boot, but I heard about Django. I'm reaching out to the experts here to help me choose a future proof framework. Django or Spring Boot?

Thanks in Advance

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Replies (5)
Recommends
SpringSpring

Kamrul Hasan, Don't choose dying technologies with small communities. How many startups do you think use Spring and Django? Use Google Trends to compare technologies. Study the StackOverflow developer survey and job websites to see what technologies are wanted. Few teams can afford to train you to get up to their level so be a life-long learner. Embrace the dawn of a new industry and become an expert.

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Sulaiman Sanusi
Recommends
SpringSpring

I recommend you stick to Java Spring as you already have experience with the technology, i suggest you master this technology and then if Django seam to be very interesting to you, django is a framework you can easily pickup as python is also easy, you have to probably be able to manage the context switching between a static typed language like Java to dynamic language like python

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Gonzalo Fernández
Recommends

Hi Kamrul,

It really depends on the kind of project and whether you feel more comfortable with Java or Python. Both are excellent frameworks, with a huge community and learning material. I've been working with Spring Boot since I started coding almost and I can assure you it's the perfect combination for Java. The learning curve may be harder that Django, but once you know the basics you're good to go. I can't tell you much about Django but you must now by now that it has a great reputation with Python users. In any case I don't think you can go wrong with any of these two. My advice is, if you are already familiar with the Spring framework, give Spring Boot a try, because you're going to find out that it just makes the whole Spring experience so much easier. Let us know what you chose!

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Christoph Becker
Recommends
SpringSpringDjangoDjango

It depends on what you want. Spring is Java-based whereas Django is Python-based. The question rather is Java vs Python. I personally recommend Python as it's shorter and easy to learn. But Java has advantages in really big systems.

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Recommends
DjangoDjango

Both are in active development and had huge community support. It really depends on you what you are comfortable with. Both are married to their respective languages. I choose Python over Java because of its simplicity and readability. To develop in java you need to write a lot of code. That's how java is. The best part I love with Django is its synchronization with Databases.

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Decisions about Dropwizard and Spring
Hampton Catlin
VP of Engineering at Rent The Runway · | 7 upvotes · 179.7K views

Starting a new company in 2020, with a whole new stack, is a really interesting opportunity for me to look back over the last 20 years of my career with web software and make the right decision for my company.

And, I went with the most radical decision– which is to ignore "sexy" / "hype" technologies almost entirely, and go back to a stack that I first used over 15 years ago.

For my purposes, we are building a video streaming platform, where I wanted rapid customer-facing feature development, high testability, simple scaling, and ease of hiring great, experienced talent. To be clear, our web platform is NOT responsible for handling the actual bits and bytes of the video itself, that's an entirely different stack. It simply needs to manage the business rules and the customers experience of the video content.

I reviewed a lot of different technologies, but none of them seemed to fit the bill as well as Rails did! The hype train had long left the station with Rails, and the community is a little more sparse than it was previously. And, to be honest, Ruby was the language that was easiest for developers, but I find that most languages out there have adopted many of it's innovations for ease of use – or at least corrected their own.

Even with all of that, Rails still seems like the best framework for developing web applications that are no more complex than they need to be. And that's key to me, because it's very easy to go use React and Redux and GraphQL and a whole host of AWS Lamba's to power my blog... but you simply don't actually NEED that.

There are two choices I made in our stack that were new for me personally, and very different than what I would have chosen even 5 years ago.

1) Postgres - I decided to switch from MySql to Postgres for this project. I wanted to use UUID's instead of numeric primary keys, and knew I'd have a couple places where better JSON/object support would be key. Mysql remains far more popular, but almost every developer I respect has switched and preferred Postgres with a strong passion. It's not "sexy" but it's considered "better".

2) Stimulus.js - This was definitely the biggest and wildest choice to make. Stimulus is a Javascript framework by my old friend Sam Stephenson (Prototype.js, rbenv, turbolinks) and DHH, and it is a sort of radical declaration that your Javascript in the browser can be both powerful and modern AND simple. It leans heavily on the belief that HTML-is-good and that data-* attributes are good. It focuses on the actions and interactions and not on the rendering aspects. It took me a while to wrap my head around, and I still have to remind myself, that server-side-HTML is how you solve many problems with this stack, and avoid trying to re-render things just in the browser. So far, I'm happy with this choice, but it is definitely a radical departure from the current trends.

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Pros of Dropwizard
Pros of Spring
  • 27
    Quick and easy to get a new http service going
  • 23
    Health monitoring
  • 20
    Easy setup
  • 19
    Metrics integration
  • 18
    Good conventions
  • 14
    Lightweight
  • 14
    Good documentation
  • 12
    Java Powered
  • 10
    Good Testing frameworks
  • 7
    Java powered, lightweight
  • 4
    Simple
  • 4
    Scalable
  • 3
    Great performance, Good in prod
  • 2
    Open source
  • 2
    All in one-productive-production ready-makes life easy
  • 221
    Java
  • 155
    Open source
  • 133
    Great community
  • 120
    Very powerful
  • 111
    Enterprise
  • 63
    Lot of great subprojects
  • 59
    Easy setup
  • 44
    Convention , configuration, done
  • 38
    Standard
  • 29
    Love the logic
  • 12
    Good documentation
  • 10
    Stability
  • 10
    Dependency injection
  • 7
    MVC
  • 6
    Easy
  • 3
    Strong typing
  • 3
    Makes the hard stuff fun & the easy stuff automatic
  • 2
    Maven
  • 2
    Code maintenance
  • 2
    Best practices
  • 2
    Great Desgin
  • 2
    Easy Integration with Spring Security
  • 2
    Integrations with most other Java frameworks
  • 1
    Java has more support and more libraries
  • 1
    Supports vast databases
  • 1
    Large ecosystem with seamless integration
  • 1
    OracleDb integration
  • 1
    Live project

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Dropwizard
Cons of Spring
  • 2
    Slightly more confusing dependencies
  • 1
    Not on ThoughtWorks radar since 2014
  • 15
    Draws you into its own ecosystem and bloat
  • 3
    Verbose configuration
  • 3
    Poor documentation
  • 3
    Java
  • 1
    Java is more verbose language in compare to python

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

What is Dropwizard?

Dropwizard is a sneaky way of making fast Java web applications. Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, light-weight package that lets you focus on getting things done.

What is Spring?

A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

What companies use Dropwizard?
What companies use Spring?
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What tools integrate with Spring?

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What are some alternatives to Dropwizard and Spring?
Spring Boot
Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.
Play
Play Framework makes it easy to build web applications with Java & Scala. Play is based on a lightweight, stateless, web-friendly architecture. Built on Akka, Play provides predictable and minimal resource consumption (CPU, memory, threads) for highly-scalable applications.
Dropwizard Metrics
It is a Java library which gives you insight into what your code does in production. It provides a powerful toolkit of ways to measure the behavior of critical components in your production environment. It provides you with full-stack visibility.
Jersey
It is open source, production quality, framework for developing RESTful Web Services in Java that provides support for JAX-RS APIs and serves as a JAX-RS (JSR 311 & JSR 339) Reference Implementation. It provides it’s own API that extend the JAX-RS toolkit with additional features and utilities to further simplify RESTful service and client development.
Micronaut Framework
It is a modern, JVM-based, full-stack framework for building modular, easily testable microservice and serverless applications. It features a Dependency Injection and Aspect-Oriented Programming runtime that uses no reflection.
See all alternatives