Django vs Meteor vs Rails

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Django

23.9K
20.7K
+ 1
3.6K
Meteor

1.8K
1.6K
+ 1
1.7K
Rails

14.5K
9.9K
+ 1
5.4K
Advice on Django, Meteor, and Rails
Needs advice
on
Spring Boot
and
Django

I need to build a system(web app) where people will share their projects and will receive funding against those projects if someone likes the projects. The backend should be secure, and the tools that will be needed to build that system should be free. We are a startup that can't invest too much in tools right now. We need to build it in 3-4 four months.

The application should be able to support 10k users for now and should be able to scale later.

Also, please suggest what front-end technologies I should use.

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Replies (1)
Top Notch

Depending on the backend I would pick the technology you feel most comfortable with, although, my preference would go to Django with Django REST Framework considering the timeframe you mentioned.

As for the front-end, React.JS and Vue are easy to get started with.

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
.NET Core
and
Django

Looking for Advice! I am developing a hybrid app for video streaming, I have a prior experience with .NET Core and would like to use it for my back end but the latest buzz on characteristics of Node.js such as light weight, event loop and Async capabilities is really tempting me to reconsider my decision. On a quick research I could observe that a lot of Internet companies use either Python Django or Node JS for their back end which has thrown me into confusion, looking for an expert advice, thx.

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Replies (4)
anas mattar
Technical Lead at DPO International · | 4 upvotes · 33.8K views
Recommends
.NET Core

That's depend on your experience if you are very well in C# you should start using the Technology that's you know and like it.

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So none of these tools may be bad for your implementation of this streaming app. But one thing to consider is what are you trying to achieve. If your application is more front end facing with streaming to a backend service C# may be your better implementation path just due to its greater overall versatility in terms of options for mobile, backend development, front end development, service development, etc... However if your focused purely on the streaming aspects and utilizing Amazon or Azure services in conjunction with the language of choice, Python, Node.Js, Django or other technologies may offer a faster option to success. Another thing to consider is many of the streaming platforms today utilize services from cloud vendors to achieve their success more than simply the ingenuity on the part of their internal staff's programming skills. Traditional programming languages like Java, C++, C# are used less these days. Today most teams are piggybacking off these services where its possible to give your application the greatest ability to compete with the big boys. - Your Friendly Neighborhood Tech Manager

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Aslam Mohammad
Systems Engineer at Infosys · | 1 upvotes · 23.2K views
Recommends
Node.js
Django

You could apparently go for both Node or Django but I would recommend choosing Node as you're building a video streaming app and the biggest video streaming service Netflix used Node in the production.

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Pavel Nekrasov
MyOpenTour at MyOpenTour · | 1 upvotes · 39 views
Recommends
fastapi
at

Take a look at FastAPI if you are going to choose Python

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Leonardo Viada
Project manager and web developer at Revo Digital · | 4 upvotes · 13.9K views
Needs advice
on
Scala
Rails
and
Play
at

In the past few months, a project we're working on grew up quite fast. Since we're adding more and more features, I'm considering migrating my Express/TS REST API towards a more solid and more "enterprise-like" framework. Since I am experienced with TypeScript but not so much with Rails nor Play (Scala), I'd like to have some advice on which one could provide the best development experience, and most importantly, the smoothest paradigm transition from the JS/TS world. I've worked on some personal project with Rails, but I've found the Ruby language really distant from what the TypeScript ecosystem and syntax are, whereas on the opposite - during the brief tours I've taken in the past weeks - it's been a pleasure coding in Scala. Obviously, there are some key differences between the two languages - and the two frameworks consequently - but despite all the ROR automation and ease of use I don't despise at all Scala's pragmatic and great features such as static typing, pattern matching, and type inference. So... Please help me out with the choice! Regards

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Replies (4)
ALESSIO SALTARIN
Master IT Architect at IBM · | 5 upvotes · 11.7K views

If you are comfortable with TypeScript, why not evolve to a C# ecosystem? Asp.Net Core + Entity Framework is a mature and well supported technology. As far as I can see in the enterprise market, the most adopted choice is still Java. So, maybe you may have a look to SpringBoot - and ultimately Quarkus.

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Kevin Emery
QE Systems Engineer at Discovery, Inc. · | 5 upvotes · 11.3K views
Recommends
Rails

I don't have the Scala experience to compare the two, but I can say that Ruby is a wonderful language. For procedural programming where you don't need a lot of concurrent execution threads, it's superior to Node.JS in my opinion. All of the concepts from Typescript have equivalent syntax in Ruby, but there are fewer symbols (e.g. () => { ... }); ) and more keywords (eg 'do ... end'). It's a very flexible language and allows for a lot of different approaches to how it's written, so coding standards and careful organization is important. In the long run, however, you'll find it quicker to debug than Node.JS and just as powerful.

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malekmfs
at Meam Software Engineering Group · | 3 upvotes · 4.6K views
Recommends
Scala
Rails

This is advice regardless of your background and requirements. The Play framework has a terrible and complicated design, don't risk it. I even suggest Spring and Kotlin over it! You can use Scala for small services and Data Engineering stuff and benefit optimizations and threading of JVM. RoR, on the other hand, has a huge development speed, which I believe is a big advantage cause you can handle performance bottlenecks later. Also, Scala has another downside, which is featureful in terms of OO and FP paradigms, which makes anyone write code freely with any personal style and makes it a problem in a team, Hence a coding style has to be defined if there would be Scala development team.

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Hosam Aly
Senior Software Engineer · | 3 upvotes · 4.2K views
Recommends
Scala
Rails
Play

If software performance is your top priority, then Scala/Play is probably best. If developer productivity is your top priority, then Ruby on Rails is the best choice in my opinion.

The Rails framework is batteries-included. The framework takes care of many things by default so that you don't have to. Logging, security, etc. It's also well-integrated; for example, controllers understand models out of the box. I had a better experience with RoR than with Play.

On the other hand, Scala and the JVM are more performant in general, so they can scale to serve more requests per second on the same hardware.

If you're considering serverless functions, then Scala is probably a better choice because it would be faster to load, giving you better economics.

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Decisions about Django, Meteor, and Rails
Christian Stefanescu
Head of IT at lawpilots · | 5 upvotes · 2.7K views

A big part of our needs fits perfectly into what Django has to offer: an ORM with support for PostgreSQL , the amazing auto-generated admin interface, consolidated tooling around the application lifecycle and a well-established community with solutions to the majority of common problems.

We use Django whenever we need the auto-generated admin and the friendly templating language to build capable web applications which are relatively easy to maintain for a comparably long time. The excellent integrations for Celery and Django REST framework make it easy to build the necessary integrations with other services.

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Tyrell Perera
Senior Engineering Manager at Telstra · | 4 upvotes · 8.4K views
Migrated
from
Django
to
Spring Boot

I inherited a large Python Django application as part of a corporate re-structure. After careful analysis, working with the new team, we decided to break the monolith into a microservices architecture. While doing so, we managed to port some of those microservices into Spring boot. Better performance and widely available expertise within my current team made me make this decision.

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Ing. Alvaro Rodríguez Scelza
Software Systems Engineer at Ripio · | 11 upvotes · 89K views

I was considering focusing on learning RoR and looking for a work that uses those techs.

After some investigation, I decided to stay with C# .NET:

  • It is more requested on job positions (7 to 1 in my personal searches average).

  • It's been around for longer.

  • it has better documentation and community.

  • One of Ruby advantages (its amazing community gems, that allows to quickly build parts of your systems by merely putting together third party components) gets quite complicated to use and maintain in huge applications, where building and reusing your own components may become a better approach.

  • Rail's front end support is starting to waver.

  • C# .NET code is far easier to understand, debug and maintain. Although certainly not easier to learn from scratch.

  • Though Rails has an excellent programming speed, C# tends to get the upper hand in long term projects.

I would avise to stick to rails when building small projects, and switching to C# for more long term ones.

Opinions are welcome!

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Pros of Django
Pros of Meteor
Pros of Rails
  • 619
    Rapid development
  • 459
    Open source
  • 394
    Great community
  • 344
    Easy to learn
  • 256
    Mvc
  • 208
    Beautiful code
  • 207
    Elegant
  • 187
    Free
  • 186
    Great packages
  • 173
    Great libraries
  • 63
    Restful
  • 60
    Powerful
  • 59
    Comes with auth and crud admin panel
  • 55
    Great documentation
  • 52
    Great for web
  • 41
    Python
  • 35
    Great orm
  • 31
    Great for api
  • 24
    All included
  • 20
    Web Apps
  • 19
    Fast
  • 16
    Used by top startups
  • 14
    Clean
  • 13
    Sexy
  • 12
    Easy setup
  • 10
    Convention over configuration
  • 7
    ORM
  • 7
    Allows for very rapid development with great libraries
  • 7
    The Django community
  • 5
    Its elegant and practical
  • 5
    Great MVC and templating engine
  • 4
    Full stack
  • 4
    Mvt
  • 4
    Easy Structure , useful inbuilt library
  • 4
    Fast prototyping
  • 4
    Easy to develop end to end AI Models
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Easy to use
  • 3
    King of backend world
  • 3
    Cross-Platform
  • 3
    Batteries included
  • 3
    Have not found anything that it can't do
  • 2
    Scaffold
  • 2
    Zero code burden to change databases
  • 2
    Full-Text Search
  • 2
    Map
  • 2
    Modular
  • 2
    Very quick to get something up and running
  • 2
    Many libraries
  • 2
    Python community
  • 2
    Great peformance
  • 2
    Just the right level of abstraction
  • 1
    Easy to change database manager
  • 250
    Real-time
  • 197
    Full stack, one language
  • 181
    Best app dev platform available today
  • 153
    Data synchronization
  • 151
    Javascript
  • 117
    Focus on your product not the plumbing
  • 106
    Open source
  • 105
    Hot code pushes
  • 100
    Live page updates
  • 92
    Latency compensation
  • 38
    Ultra-simple development environment
  • 29
    Smart Packages
  • 28
    Real time awesome
  • 23
    Great for beginners
  • 22
    Direct Cordova integration
  • 16
    Better than Rails
  • 15
    Less moving parts
  • 13
    It's just amazing
  • 10
    Blaze
  • 8
    Great community support
  • 8
    Plugins for everything
  • 6
    One command spits out android and ios ready apps.
  • 5
    It just works
  • 5
    0 to Production in no time
  • 4
    Is Agile in development hybrid(mobile/web)
  • 4
    Easy deployment
  • 4
    Coding Speed
  • 4
    You can grok it in a day. No ng nonsense
  • 2
    AngularJS Integration
  • 2
    Easy yet powerful
  • 2
    One Code => 3 Platforms: Web, Android and IOS
  • 1
    High quality, very few bugs
  • 1
    Easy Setup
  • 1
    Free
  • 1
    Nosql
  • 1
    Hookie friendly
  • 1
    Community
  • 1
    Friendly to use
  • 1
    Stack available on Codeanywhere
  • 1
    Real time
  • 847
    Rapid development
  • 648
    Great gems
  • 604
    Great community
  • 479
    Convention over configuration
  • 416
    Mvc
  • 349
    Great for web
  • 344
    Beautiful code
  • 311
    Open source
  • 270
    Great libraries
  • 260
    Active record
  • 105
    Elegant
  • 88
    Easy to learn
  • 86
    Easy Database Migrations
  • 78
    Makes you happy
  • 73
    Free
  • 62
    Great routing
  • 53
    Has everything you need to get the job done
  • 41
    Great Data Modeling
  • 38
    Beautiful
  • 38
    MVC - Easy to start on
  • 35
    Easy setup
  • 26
    Great caching
  • 25
    Ultra rapid development time
  • 22
    It's super easy
  • 17
    Great Resources
  • 16
    Easy to build mockups that work
  • 14
    Less Boilerplate
  • 7
    Developer Friendly
  • 7
    API Development
  • 6
    Great documentation
  • 5
    Easy REST API creation
  • 5
    Quick
  • 4
    Great language
  • 4
    Intuitive
  • 4
    Haml and sass
  • 4
    Easy to learn, use, improvise and update
  • 2
    It works
  • 2
    Jet packs come standard
  • 2
    Easy and fast
  • 2
    Legacy
  • 2
    Metaprogramming
  • 1
    Convention over configuration
  • 1
    Easy Testing
  • 1
    Cancan
  • 1
    It's intuitive

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Cons of Django
Cons of Meteor
Cons of Rails
  • 24
    Underpowered templating
  • 19
    Underpowered ORM
  • 18
    Autoreload restarts whole server
  • 15
    URL dispatcher ignores HTTP method
  • 10
    Internal subcomponents coupling
  • 7
    Not nodejs
  • 7
    Admin
  • 6
    Configuration hell
  • 3
    Not as clean and nice documentation like Laravel
  • 3
    Bloated admin panel included
  • 3
    Python
  • 2
    Overwhelming folder structure
  • 2
    Not typed
  • 1
    InEffective Multithreading
  • 4
    Hard to debug issues on the server-side
  • 4
    Heavily CPU bound
  • 4
    Does not scale well
  • 20
    Too much "magic" (hidden behavior)
  • 13
    Poor raw performance
  • 11
    Asset system is too primitive and outdated
  • 6
    Bloat in models
  • 6
    Heavy use of mixins
  • 3
    Very Very slow

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What is Django?

Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.

What is Meteor?

A Meteor application is a mix of JavaScript that runs inside a client web browser, JavaScript that runs on the Meteor server inside a Node.js container, and all the supporting HTML fragments, CSS rules, and static assets.

What is Rails?

Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.

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What companies use Meteor?
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Blog Posts

Jun 6 2019 at 5:11PM

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What are some alternatives to Django, Meteor, and Rails?
Flask
Flask is intended for getting started very quickly and was developed with best intentions in mind.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
Laravel
It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.
PHP
Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
WordPress
The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family.
See all alternatives
Reviews of Django, Meteor, and Rails
Founder at cloak.ly
Review of
Meteor

I discovered Meteor thanks to my daughter who used it for a project at MIT. I was amazed at how much she had built in such a short time. I had also been trying to figure out how to build a browser-based crypto app so I jumped into Meteor and had an MVP for cloak.ly in a few short months starting from nothing. Learning Meteor really alters what you perceive as easy and difficult in full-stack development. It has an amazing ability to simplify your thinking and your code. Community support in terms of packages is outstanding as well which saves tremendous time. The quality of the software is outstanding with very few regressions cropping up during their frequent releases.

Being at the bleeding edge of the js community does have its downsides however. While early Meteor (with Blaze/handlebars templates) was exceedingly simple, Meteor have had to introduce support for both angular and react. In combination with the move to ECMAscript this has resulted in a lot of work for developers to just keep up with the evolution of the platform. Someone who was an expert 6 months ago might quickly find themselves being a newb again. If you're someone who doesn't like change you may want to stick to jQuery.

Living in the bay area I have the luxury of being able to attend Meteor events frequently. Having met many members of the MDG team, I have tremendous confidence in the future of the platform. This is a very solid group with a rare combination of broad vision and excellent execution.

Review of
Meteor

Meteor is my favorite framework. It makes everything fun. Syncing data across devices is really easy and you don't have to mess around with sockets at all. You can insert data into the database on the client. There's tons of security options. There's over 3000 packages on the packaging system. Instant iOS and Android apps. Amazing, reactive routing. Free hosting. Easy deployment with Meteor Up. What's not to like?

Review of
Meteor

Meteor is so powerful and flexible. I love it. In the near future, it will be the top-used framework.

Review of
Meteor

We have gone "all in" on Meteor and I recommend you do to.

How developers use Django, Meteor, and Rails
StackShare uses
Rails

The first live version of Leanstack was actually a WordPress site. There wasn’t a whole lot going on at first. We had static pages with static content that needed to be updated manually. Then came the concept of user-generated content and we made the switch to a full on Rails app in November of last year. Nick had a lot of experience with Rails so that made the decision pretty easy. But I had also played around with Rails previously and was comfortable working with it. I also knew I’d need to hire engineers with a lot more experience building web apps than I do, so I wanted to go with a language and framework other people would have experience with. Also, the sheer number of gems and tools available for Rails is pretty amazing (shout to RubyToolbox ).

I don’t see us ever having to move away from Rails really, but I could be wrong. Leanstack was built in Rails 3. For StackShare we decided to upgrade to Rails 4. Biggest issue with that has been caching. DHH decided to remove the standard page and action caching in favor of key-based caching (source)[http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/caching_with_rails.html#page-caching]. Probably a good thing from a framework-perspective. But pretty shitty to have to learn about that after testing out your new app and realizing nothing is cached anymore :( We’ll need to spend some more time implementing "Russian Doll Caching", but for now we’ve got a random mixture of fragment and action caching (usually one or the other) based on which pages are most popular.

Karma uses
Rails

We use Rails for webpages and projects, not for backend services. Actually if you click through our website, you won't notice it but you're clicking though, I think, seven or eight different Rails projects. We tie those all together with a front-end library that we wrote, which basically makes sure that you have a consistent experience over all these different Rails apps.

It's a gem, we call it Karmeleon. It's not a gem that we released. It's an internal gem. Basically what it does is it makes sure that we have a consistent layout across multiple Rails apps. Then we can share stuff like a menu bar or footer or that kind of stuff.

So if we start a new front end project it's always a Rails application. We pull in the Karmeleon gem with all our styling stuff and then basically the application is almost ready to be deployed. That would be an empty page, but you would still have top bar, footer, you have some custom components that you can immediately use. So it kind of bootstraps our entire project to be a front end project.

Instacart uses
Rails

Web has always been in Rails from the beginning, so we used Redis for caching our items, which we had, from the beginning. Rails is kind of what we were comfortable with, and we knew we wanted the front end to be really, really snappy, so we de-normalized all the item attributes into Redis, and that's how it got served out.

Tim Lucas uses
Rails

Rails 5 (beta 3) provided a nice structure for rendering responses, linking to front-end assets (compiled previously via Webpack), handling sessions w/ tailor made login links via an email button/token, background jobs, and creating an admin behind basic auth to allow managing of users and purchases.

MOKA Analytics uses
Django

Django takes the hassle out of building an enterprise web application using Python.

  • admin app for administration
  • ORM for deploying against different database vendors
  • social auth package for authentication with enterprise IdP
  • guardian package for authorization
Ngakkan Nyaagu uses
Rails

For this project rails was ideal due to new features introduced in Rails 5 that allowed us to build a lightweight "API only" project. Developer familiarity and the ability to rapidly iterate, as well as providing an accessible testing framework were additional factors.

Yaakov Gesher uses
Django

Our backend was written in Django. We took advantage of the ready-to-go admin interface as a go-to solution for the client to be able to authorize his users, as well as other functionality, while most of the work was done through the Django Rest Framework.

Blair Gemmer uses
Django

Hands down the best Python web framework I've used. Very easy to extend and add apps and go from 0 to full project quickly and painlessly. I built a fully authenticated project with a single endpoint in less than 30 minutes.

cloak.ly uses
Meteor

Without Meteor cloak.ly could not have been built as quickly by such a small team. Meteor was instrumental to getting an MVP up quickly and dealing with the complexities of browser-based encryption.

Kang Hyeon Ku uses
Django

정말 편리하고 많은것을 알아서 제공해 주는 프레임워크 이다. 책의 예제만 진행해서 많이 써보지는 못했지만, 쉽게 쉽게 웹을 개발 할 수 있는 점이 매력적 이다. 게다가 orm 이 기본으로 내장 되어 있고 db 도 sqlite 가 기본으로 되어있어. 그냥 django 만 설치하면 바로 웹개발이 가능하다.

Seungkwon Park uses
Django

django는 저의 무기입니다.

django 이외에 flask로 간단한 restful api를 만들면서 느낀점은 framework 보다 언어가 중요하다는것을 알았고 django가 얼마나 큰 framework인지 알게되었습니다.

저는 signal 사용을 좋아합니다.

ShareThis uses
Meteor

Built on Node.js, Meteor's real time reactivity and its wide package ecosystem allows us to quickly prototype and build apps in a lean way

Giftstarter uses
Meteor

We would like to make magic with Meteor for the future of GiftStarter.

Hooked uses
Meteor

Hooked is built with Meteor as the primary application framework.

IVS uses
Meteor

Typical buzz tech. Nothing practical in here.