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C# vs HTML5: What are the differences?

C#: Simple, general-purpose, object-oriented programming language for the .NET platform. C# (pronounced "See Sharp") is a simple, modern, object-oriented, and type-safe programming language. C# has its roots in the C family of languages and will be immediately familiar to C, C++, Java, and JavaScript programmers; HTML5: 5th major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web. HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.

C# and HTML5 can be categorized as "Languages" tools.

"Cool syntax", "Great lambda support" and "Great generics support" are the key factors why developers consider C#; whereas "New doctype", "Local storage" and "Canvas" are the primary reasons why HTML5 is favored.

9GAG, Asana, and Disqus are some of the popular companies that use HTML5, whereas C# is used by Intuit, Stack Exchange, and OpenTable. HTML5 has a broader approval, being mentioned in 3166 company stacks & 3482 developers stacks; compared to C#, which is listed in 697 company stacks and 1163 developer stacks.

Advice on C# and HTML5
Needs advice
on
C#C#JavaScriptJavaScript
and
KotlinKotlin

Hello everybody,

I'm Syed, recently graduated from university. I studied C++ as the first programming language and later I have (a little) experience working with C#. I also have a basic understanding of Kotlin, JavaScript and Python. As of today, I am studying Kotlin from https://developer.android.com/.

Please give me some tips about my career. Which language should I choose in today's modern era? Whether I go with Web development or work on Android app development. Thank you for your assistance.

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Replies (1)

Hi Syed, I wish you all the best. I'm an experienced programmer with more than 15 years of experience. Recently in my company, we were trying to hire a MERN Full-Stack developer and we found many who can code in React but few who were capable of thinking logically and actually able to solve the business problem. Learn any language or package, but keep in mind to learn for a goal. Syntaxes don't matter, we hire to achieve goals. Small to medium companies, usually hire full-stack developers due to the lack of resources. So it would be great to learn the following: For Web, I would suggest "React", and for mobile development, "Flutter" comes in handy with lots of promising future. How about learning both? much better but it's all about you. Good luck!

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fisher boy
Intern web developer at Stepway · | 8 upvotes · 62.2K views
Needs advice
on
CSS 3CSS 3HTML5HTML5
and
JavaScriptJavaScript
in

Hey I'm currently an undergraduate in computer science for almost 5 years now, still left with a few courses before I complete. I know that I'm not good at programming but still I choose developer based programming career approach, I have made plans to start my career in websites, etc, for that, I have purchased books related to HTML5, CSS , JavaScript. I'm currently learning HTML5 and CSS only and after this some JavaScript I am really confident in my decision but would love to know what an expert developer advice thanks in advance.

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Replies (8)

Whatever you do don't go WordPress path. Developers over-there tend to ignore system limitations and hardcode and overengineer their solutions so as to please their clients. If you are a beginner probably you'll get to work on someone else's shitty code and will be asked by your boss to do "yet another impossible thing with Wordpress". And... Probably... You'll do it.

My suggestion is: think in stacks and don't start too low. Starting with HTML, CSS3 and JavaScript is too low. Start on higher levels and with something practical. You'll have time for basics some time later and it would be much easier, because you'll see those technologies are compliment to what you do and not your main objective.

My suggestion for you:

  • Android Mobile App Development path (complex enough so you won't get bored)
  • All things web3 crypto, nft, virtual reality, blockchain path (has tons of computing web development tasks)
  • Cloud computing setup and administration path (good, because you say you're not good at programming)
  • Artificial intelligence and automation (this is future, people need this)

I've also found it helpful to think of each stack as a surface (find Google Images "radar chart") . Every time you try to learn something new you start in the center, with all technology-points overlapping. You are as low as you can get and you know nothing. Your job is to expand outwards each technology so as to make a stack-surace. The more surface the better. You'll see that some technological-aspects are easier to expand than others and plan your time accordingly.

Have a good start!

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You can also try starting with one of the big marketing agencies. Even if you don't feel like you're ready to start as a web developer (you likely are, though, they hire at all levels) you can start as a content author or similar supporting role until you're more comfortable, then transition into a development role within the same company when you're ready.

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Shanover Saiyed
Software Engineer (Web) · | 4 upvotes · 12.3K views
Recommends
SvelteSvelteVue.jsVue.js

I would recommend you to learn these quickly and get on learning a good front-end framework like Vue, ReactJs, Svelte. Pick up real world projects not just learn from books. Always keep learning about the new technologies used to develop things because IT Web development tools and their approach is growing faster than ever, you have got to keep up with those new techs and tools. Final advise, open any job portal, find your targeted job and see what requirements are their.

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Recommends

I don't believe that you are confident about your decision to follow a career path as a developer. This migh be your department's fault and not necessarily yours. Most good developers are already working as developers at that age. Although your current status states that you are an intern you are struggling to find a good starting point. Since you are interested in website developmnet you can start learning programming using a mainstream CMS such as wordpress. Do you know how many companies and self employed guys make their living by customizing wordpess? But if you want to step out of the crowd then seek for junior jobs on a fintech or on a vertical market such as travel or betting. Search for online job oportunities and find out what technologies these guys use then take an online course and start learning the language. Within a month or two apply for a job as a junior and use as reference the online course.

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Jose Vargas
Recommends
JavaScriptJavaScript

JavaScript is an ever growing technology with lots of opportunities and great depth for both front end and back end development. I would say that JavaScript is a safe bet in terms of furthering your career as a developer in 2022 and beyond. There’s lots of tools and frameworks based on this language that you would have to make decisions on which ones you want to become an expert. I recommend you follow interesting people that you admire to draw inspiration from. Such as Ben Awad or Jeff Delaney. Check this web page recommended to me by the latter on his YouTube channel “Fireship”: https://2021.stateofjs.com/en-US/resources/

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Michael Milawski

Everyone needs to start somewhere. Starting a webdeveloper career by learning html, js and css are the absolute must have skills. Html and css are not that hard to learn and I would start with that. Learn from youtube videos and books, apply your skills by creating your own small html sites. Just a simple small site where you play with the design and learn everything about html and how it behaves, what is possible etc. If you are confident enough with html and css start to play with javascript. Later if you are experienced enough you can create complex applications using JavaScript. From there you can decide if you want to become a frontend webdeveloper or backend. Demand is high for both frontend and backend devs.

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Recommends

this article might help you. Web development is a combination of skills. not only developing skills but also SEO and other stuff. codehub.lk/web-development-skills-you-must-have/

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Recommends

JS + HTML + CSS only tackles the front-end of programming. I suggest you can start to learn by finding an open API related to something you love and then creating a website for it. (E.g. movies, documentaries, music, whatever you are into) Also you can do this dude's tutorials https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtKciwk_si4

Later on, when you've already one a few projects, start to learn the backend side of things (database + whatever you want - C#, Python...)

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Youcef Benamare
Needs advice
on
C langC langC++C++
and
C#C#

include include int main(){ char name[10], pasword[10]; printf("enter you user name :"); gets(name); printf("enter your pasword : "); gets(pasword); printf("your name : %s \n your password : %s \n", name, pasword); if ( name != "youcef") { printf("name undefined\n"); } else { printf("finde name"); }

}

his not working

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Replies (2)
Richard Rios
Senior Software Engineer · | 5 upvotes · 71.7K views
Recommends
C langC lang

You will want to do a few things here. First, replace gets with fgets. Then, you're going to want to use strcmp from string.h to compare the input with the desired result. The code listed below has been updated with a working example with the previously mentioned recommendations. This isn't perfect and there are other ways to accomplish the same task. Explore other options that are available when you have a chance and see if you can improve on this example.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{ 
    char name[10], 
    pasword[10]; 

    printf("enter you user name :"); 

    // Use fgets as gets is insecure and can easily lead to buffer overflow exploits
    fgets(name, sizeof(char) * sizeof(name), stdin);

    // Remove \n from fgets stdin read with null character so as to not have to include
    // in strcmp later.
    name[strlen(name) - 1] = '\0';

    printf("enter your pasword : "); 
    fgets(pasword, sizeof(char) * sizeof(pasword), stdin);

    printf("your name : %s \n your password : %s \n", name, pasword);

    // If strcmp result > 0 || < 0 it's not a match
    if (strcmp(name, "youcef") != 0) 
    { 
        printf("name undefined\n"); 
    } 
    else 
    { 
        printf("finde name"); 
    }
}
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Recommends
C langC lang

Dear, Yusuf You can't use if statement to compare two strings, but you can use strcmp() function which means string compare The behavior of strcmp function is: If (string1 < string2)? Then: return a negative value. If (string1 > string2)? Then: return a positive value.

If(string1 == string2)? Then: return (0).

So, you can modify this statment to: if(strcmp(name,"Yousef") != 0) printf("name undefined\n");

else printf("find name");

But, In this case there is one logic problem that (strcmp) function don't ignore the letter case. For example: If you input name : yousef

The first letter here (y) is small, but in the comparing statement above is capital, So the result will be "name undefined", but in fact "yousef" = "Yousef".

To solve this problem you should use stracasecmp() function. This function ignore the letter case while comparing. The code will be: if(strcasecmp(name,"Yousef") != 0) printf("name undefined\n");

else printf("find name");

Attention: Include string libreary after using these functions to skip any problem may be found.

include

may Allah bless you ^_^

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Needs advice
on
C#C#F#F#
and
KotlinKotlin

Hi there. I want to expand my coding toolset. So I want to learn a second backend language besides Kotlin. Kotlin is fantastic. I love it in every aspect, and I think I can never return to Java. And also why should I? It is 100% interoperable with java and can co-exist in every project.

So my question here is. Which language do you think will bring me more joy? I think F#; it is more like Kotlin. Then C# (it's more or like 100% java). But, let's say I learn F#. Is it 100% interoperable like Kotlin? can they live side by side? Can I, then, apply to .NET jr jobs after a while, for example, or is C# the holy cow? I would like to learn .Net.

If it is the worst and only C# is acceptable, then which language should I learn? Dart? Go?

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Replies (3)
Recommends
C#C#KotlinKotlin

Exceptional decision to go with Kotlin. For the other story, go full with C#. "is C# the holy cow? Yes it is.". Specially now when netCore is crossplatform and you can build asp.net core applications on Windows, Linux and macOS via Visual Studio Code which is also multiplatform. Nothing will beat C# in the near future. Also, at the end of 2021 Microsoft will release Net 6.0 which will include MAUI.

"For those new to .NET MAUI (standing for .NET Multi-platform App UI), Microsoft says it's "the evolution of Xamarin.Forms extended from mobile to desktop scenarios with UI controls rebuilt from the ground up for performance and extensibility."

So, C# all the way sire!

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Recommends
C#C#

animefanx1,

First let's get your questions sorted: Which language do you think will bring me more joy?

This you will have to decide for yourself, I am a long time C# developer and have seen it grow into a very compelling platform. The language and I'd compare it more to Kotlin than Java (by a long margin). More on .NET in a bit.

say I learn F#. Is it 100% interoperable like Kotlin?

You can have 100% interop with a caveat, your F# libraries have to implement certain guidance in order to be referenced from C#. Some (dare I say most) of the differences between F# and C# are predicated on language constructs that are not available in C#. For instance F# functions that return Unit.

can they live side by side?

Yes.

Can I, then, apply to .NET jr jobs after a while, for example, or is C# the holy cow?

I don't know if I take your meaning, but let me say this: Learning either C# or F# will likely force you to understand concepts such as garbage collection, primitive types, etc. which apply to all .NET languages, thus a lot of the effort you put into .NET is bound to pay off regardless of your choice.

If it is the worst and only C# is acceptable, then which language should I learn? Dart? Go? You can't go wrong with any of these and I venture to say whether you select C#, F#, Dart or Go as your next adventure, your willingness to learn will take you to try other languages, some which mey not even exist yet!

PS1: .NET is an end to end environment now. With the introduction of Blazor and Razor pages one does not need JavaScript or other browser scripting languages, it even interops with JavaScript. PS2. Microsoft is working on unifying .NET. Soon there will be only one version: .NET 5! Caveat: Some features such as WinForms will still be specific to the windows environment but all of those are likely things you don't need in Mac or Linux

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Recommends
GolangGolang

I think you can learn go instead C#. C# is cool, but Golang also cool. It can run on any OS without specific software. C# can run on linux too but it's only the .NET Core as I know. But golang is flexible. So try it and decide what do you think about Golang

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Needs advice
on
C#C#JavaScriptJavaScript
and
ReactReact

Hi Everyone,

I have some experience working with JavaScript and React and will now try to learn C# - could you please share some similarities and differences between JS and C# and what rookie mistakes I should watch out for when learning C#?

Also, any tips & good practices are greatly appreciated :)

Thank you

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Replies (4)
Pavel Kalugin
Software Engineer at Paralect · | 9 upvotes · 119.7K views

If you want to learn C# to write some backend code you can also check out Node.js which is basically JavaScript running outside the browser. You can create any kind of web servers, APIs, scrapers, automation scripts, etc using all the same JavaScript.

A good entry to Node is Express.js. It is the most common web framework for Node. It's well documented and there are a lot of educational materials for it.

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Kudos Beluga
Recommends
F#F#Node.jsNode.js

I prefer functional programming because it produces less buggy code (thus I recommend F#), and is simply better to learn this paradigm earlier on in your coding career rather than later. It can also do most stuff C# can do, namely code with .NET core. If you're going to learn .NET then you should learn Node.js+Express first though before doing web development with C#/F#

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Hameed Moshood
Recommends
C#C#

C# is .net framework of a programming language specially different from the programming languages you're used to. If you learn C# you will be experienceed in coding with VIsual Basic .net and also creating web development using ASP and this ASP also include JavaScript function.... I urge you to learn it

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Ross M.
System Architect at MomentFactory · | 2 upvotes · 105.7K views
Recommends
C#C#JavaScriptJavaScript

I think you can manage to find something about this topic. it's pretty popular one. ex: https://www.educba.com/c-sharp-vs-js/

Something I don't see discussed enough over the internet is the performance difference. I don't think you should worry about this. 95% of the time you won't notice the difference on your day to day projets. You will know what you need in terms of performance when you get there.

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Needs advice
on
HTML5HTML5csscss
and
PHPPHP

Hello,

I want to generate dynamic CSS for each user with an expiry link.

I've created a cloud-based tool (Example - https://www.tablesgenerator.com/) where people can create tables and use them on their website by pasting the HTML generated by the tool.

Now, there are a few styling options needed, which can be done using CSS. As of now, I'm asking the users to copy the CSS and paste it in the "Custom CSS" section, which is a bit hectic work as they need to change the CSS every time if I make any changes to the styling.

So, I'm just wondering if there's a way to generate dynamic CSS for each user with an expiry link.

Currently, I have around 200 users, and what's the best way to do it?

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Replies (2)
Recommends
HTML5HTML5csscssPHPPHP

The best way, as usual, is a "it depends".

Still I would go to something as simple as storing the expire date+the generated css and other metadata in a table. If a user tries to access something that is expired than he's redirected to a specific page. Periodically (like once a day), a janitor process deletes the old data.

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Grant Steuart
Recommends
csscss

Instead of having the user copy and paste the CSS directly, have them copy and paste the HTML that will include an external CSS file generated and hosted by your application. This will allow you to control when the stylesheet is updated as well as control privileges on who can request the file. Additionally, using a CDN service (e.g. Cloudflare) will allow you to cache the static assets being requested reducing overall server load.

When your server (and optionally CDN) no longer are serving the file, consider the link expired. Unique URLs can be generated using a multitude of methods but maybe consider if there is any benefit to the users if it follows the scheme: yourdomain.com/USERNAME/CUSTOM_NAME.css rather than something like: yourdomain.com/style/SOME-UNIQUE-HASH-1234.css

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Needs advice
on
C#C#DjangoDjango
and
PythonPython

Hi all, I have been working on the development and automation of construction software using C# and Python. Recently I have started working on Django python web framework and basic frontend for web development. I am really confused to choose between C# and Python to move forward in my career. Seeking your advice on these technologies and their future market value from a career perspective. Thanks,

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Replies (3)
ALESSIO SALTARIN
Distinguished IT Architect at IBM · | 10 upvotes · 138.1K views
Recommends
C#C#DjangoDjangoPythonPython

In my opinion, a modern developer should have deep knowledge about Object Oriented (OOP) and Functional Programming (FP). The programming language is something that must come later. Any good programmer should be able to switch from one programming language to another easily, if they follow OOP and FP. There are languages, though, that must absolutely be in the portfolio of a modern developer: Java, C#, Python and JavaScript. But be prepared to know also Scala, Kotlin, Swift, Go, Ruby, Rust and TypeScript.

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Recommends
DjangoDjango

It depends on your preferred career path, if you want to work in start-up/scale-up environments, you probably want to go with a language like Django for the rapid development (fast to production). On the other hand, C# or Java would be better for building long term and large scaled applications, although, Django could certainly achieve this as well. I also want to second that it won't hurt to know both languages, pick your technologies wisely according to the use case, don't stick to a single technology stack. :)

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Carlos Iglesias
Recommends

C# and Python are both great languages. With great communities, libraries, frameworks, opportunities. I think it will be the same in a near future.

It’s matter of your likes, and your next jobs.

Dot net core is a little faster on performance. Python more popular with dynamic types. Probably the most lovable language.

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Needs advice
on
C#C#
and
GolangGolang

I need some advice to choose a language for back-end development. Right now, my REST APIs were created by using Flask/Django, and I'd like to create a more reliable and more efficient API with static typing. On the one hand, Go is young, very light, and syntax like Python's, but C# has a large number of libs and more built-in methods. Which is the best solution today?

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Replies (10)
Recommends
C#C#GolangGolang

It depends.

From times to times I asked or was asked that same question. Technology aside, it's important to consider the skills and expertise that the dev team has. Whether you use language A,B or C or framework X,Y and Z, if your team has a strong background and experience with something make it count too.

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Recommends
GolangGolang
at

I would recommend Go simply because as you mentioned, it's super light. No need to bring in the whole .NET suite to get a simple REST API up and running. Even if your API is a bit complex, Go should be able to handle it.

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Bob Bass
President & Full Stack Enginee at Narro, LLC · | 5 upvotes · 159.7K views

I started out with C# and .NET and I loved it. In my opinion, it was the perfect way to start learning the fundamentals of software development however I always felt like I was at a disadvantage when I was doing .NET development. Granted, .NET Core is now open-source and cross-platform, but I moved to Node.js simply because it is incredibly popular. I never thought I'd learn to love JavaScript it the way I did with C#, but I learned to love it pretty quickly, especially once I started using TypeScript. You get all of the benefits of C# and JavaScript all in one. If you've built a REST API with Python/Flask/Django, you'll be able to learn Node.js/Express/TypeScript well enough to migrate your API very fast and it's incredibly easy to host for free on any number of services.

I'm new to Go, I've got very little experience but the 'feel' of Go, isn't like Python in my opinion. Go has a pretty steep learning curve, much steeper than C# in my opinion. So if you are willing to consider Node/Express/TypeScript, I think you may really like it. If you're picking between Go and C#, I'd go for C# as of today, but once I am more comfortable with Go (which I anticipate being a slow process) I may change my mind.

At this moment in time, in late 2020- Node/Express/TypeScript feels like the obvious choice to me as a former C# developer.

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Vadim Bauer
Recommends
PythonPython

The best language for you is the one that you know best!

Its a bit of a guess, but from your question and the difficulties you have with Python it seems to me the problem you describe is the manifestation of a bad design/architecture/code quality. These are not the problems of a language itself!

The experience you gained over the past years with your current programming language will outmatch any benefits of another language that you start from zero.

Because in the end of the day languages aren't all that different when it comes to fullfil the same task, it's more the tools, framework and ecosystem for a particular problem that make a difference.

I worked with Java, C#, Go and recently in Phyton, and I would choose Phyton over Go for WebApps, even I like compiled languages more. Go is a very simple language, I would even say maybe too simple. I can't stand all those go boilerplate if err checks, the broken filesystem, the date/time mess and many more things that aren't actually relevant for business application at all. Go has its advantages but not for WebApps.

Keep the lang and improve your skills and architecture you will benifit more from it than from a new language.

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Recommends
GolangGolang

I recommend Go for backend. It's younger than C# doesn't mean it's not mature. It's already mature enough to be run on production. You can see there are already many companies in the world adopting Go as their backend business logic or tooling. I can name a few like Github, Shopify, uber, twitch, and many more. It's easier learning curve, low entry barrier, better performance than C#, better memory consumption than C#, since there's no VM/runtime needed. It's suitable for large scale system and large codebase for readibility and long maintainability. It's simpler than C# since no class, inheritance(this can cause hard to maintain software), exception, etc. You can still implement OO way in Go without those feature. Simple file structure, only main files and package files. It compiles to single binary and easy to deploy and work around it, unlike C# who compiled to IL and you need to wrap all those IL files to be run inside separated web server(even .Net/.Net Core platform provide built-in web server). For libs, don't worry, there are many open source libs you will found on Github and already adopted by many companies. Go is employed in personal, startup, even corporate level.

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Recommends
GolangGolang
Go now, C# later

I suggest Go because it has a simple and clean ecosystem. The language is simple. You don’t need complex configs or installs either. You’ll be up and running very quickly. It doesn’t have as much as .NET but its standard library is more than sufficient for RESTful APIs. Concurrency is much, much easier too.

C# I’d definitely recommend later on. The .NET framework, especially core, is extremely powerful and there’s little you can’t build with it. Go won’t take you long to be productive with.

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Recommends
C#C#

I have some systems on production using both languages. I tend to use golang if the API is small or medium size, but if I am going to build a large system definitively I use c#(asp netcore).

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Alexander Krylkov
Sofrware Architect at Air Astana · | 1 upvotes · 159.7K views
Recommends
C#C#

I would recommend C#, particularly Simplify.Web web-framework. C# is easy to start with (especially .NET Core). Simplify.Web is also easy to start with, no extra setup required for simple API, but on the other hand you have power of C# and full control over your API with ability to extend.

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Carlos Iglesias
Recommends

The database your are going to connect and the needed libraries could decide. Because both are awesome languages.

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Ted Elliott
Recommends
fastapifastapipydanticpydantic

If you want to stick with python you may want to consider Fastapi. It uses Pydantic to give you strongly typed models and validation. It generates openapi docs for you out of the box. They have good documentation as well and they claim it is really fast.

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Decisions about C# and HTML5
Alexandre Desroches
Founder & Developper at Finance D · | 71 upvotes · 216.9K views

I had a goal to create the simplest accounting software for Mac and Windows to help small businesses in Canada.

This led me to a long 2 years of exploration of the best language that could provide these features:

  • Great overall productivity
  • International wide-spread usage for long-term sustainability and easy to find documentation
  • Versatility for creating websites and desktop softwares
  • Enjoyable developper experience
  • Ability to create good looking modern UIs
  • Job openings with this language

I tried Python, Java, C# and C++ without finding what I was looking for.

When I discovered Javascript, I really knew it was the right language to use. Thinking of this today makes me realize even more how great a decision this has been to learn, use and master Javascript. It has been a fun, challenging and productive road on which I am still satisfied.

Obviously, when I refer to Javascript, it is not without implying the vast ecosystem around it. For me, JS is a whole universe in which almost every imaginable tools exist. It's awesome - for real. Thanks to all the contributors which have made it possible.

To be even clearer about how intense I am with Javascript, let's just say that my first passion was music. Until, I find coding with Javascript! Yep, I know!

So in conclusion, I chose Javascript because it is versatile, enjoyable, widely used, productive for both desktop softwares and websites with ability to create modern great looking user interfaces (assuming HTML and CSS are involved) and finally there are job openings.

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  • Client-Side: \ The form of our product is a web app because we would also provide a dashboard for displaying data and for some further purpose including data filtering and comparison. Hence, we would definitely use HTML5 for structuring the web, CSS3 for styling the web, and JavaScript for building the front-end logic. As for frameworks, we would use React because it is component-based that can keep our front-end code clean and organized. The virtual DOM of React also provides better efficiency in time when rendering the page. Furthermore, React has a greater number of users than Vue and Angular, thus have active communities for problem-spotting and problem-solving. We would also incorporate Bootstrap into our web app to provide an aesthetic user interface and thus to improve the user experience. The fact that Boostrap supports responsive site would also ease our workload if future adaptation for mobiles is needed.
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Frontend:

  • For our web app frontend, we decided to use TypeScript as our programming language because it supports all functionality of JavaScript and supports optional typing to the language, which can help us take advantage of OOP.
  • We chose ReactJS as our frontend library because its state management would be very handy for our single-page app. React is also component-based, which can help us improve the modularity and extensibility of the project.
  • Aside from the standard web technology HTML/CSS, we will useBootstrap to style UI components and make our web app responsive to different screen sizes.
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Ing. Alvaro Rodríguez Scelza
Software Systems Engineer at Ripio · | 12 upvotes · 223.8K views

I was considering focusing on learning RoR and looking for a work that uses those techs.

After some investigation, I decided to stay with C# .NET:

  • It is more requested on job positions (7 to 1 in my personal searches average).

  • It's been around for longer.

  • it has better documentation and community.

  • One of Ruby advantages (its amazing community gems, that allows to quickly build parts of your systems by merely putting together third party components) gets quite complicated to use and maintain in huge applications, where building and reusing your own components may become a better approach.

  • Rail's front end support is starting to waver.

  • C# .NET code is far easier to understand, debug and maintain. Although certainly not easier to learn from scratch.

  • Though Rails has an excellent programming speed, C# tends to get the upper hand in long term projects.

I would avise to stick to rails when building small projects, and switching to C# for more long term ones.

Opinions are welcome!

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A major part of our project includes visualizing the data through graphs and charts. We chose to use d3.js since it provides a wide selection of well-designed graphics and animations. As a library, it is also easy to use and be included in our UI. JavaScript which our team has experience with was also selected to integrate graphics from d3.js into the UI, as well as to integrate the UI with the backend system. Along with JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3 are also selected mostly for styling and formatting the webpage. These three languages are widely used which means that more support will be available, making the implementation process easier.

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Labib Chowdhury
Student at University of Toronto · | 5 upvotes · 78.6K views

The key to our product relies on explainability and user experience when using our product. With this is mind, it is important to build a clean, readable web interface that a user will be able to navigate easily and quickly debug their security issues. The stack chosen for the interface of our product includes: JavaScript + React, CSS, HTML, Material UI and D3.js.

React provides us with simplicity to allow us to deliver the MVP as soon as possible. React also has multiple open source libraries to ease our development. Being able to reuse React components will help in developing the product fast as well as making the user interface modular. Since we're using React, we will also be using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS to create the frontend.

To design the UI, using a minimal approach would be the best solution. The Material UI library provides us with minimal and aesthetically pleasing React Components which would make our frontend look pleasing to the user.

Finally, our UI will consist of displaying information from our Machine Learning model in a dashboard type view. To display data in tasteful manner, we have chosen to use the D3.js library. This library is the most popular data visualization library for React with over 80k stars on Github. D3 also provides seamless compatibility with React and has a variety of features which would make the data we produce visually pleasing.

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Xinyi Liu
Software Developer at BigClarity · | 6 upvotes · 248.4K views

As our team will be building a web application, HTML5 and CSS3 are one of the standardized combinations to implement the structure and the styling of a webpage. Material-UI comes with all sorts of predesigned web components such as buttons and dropdowns that will save us tons of development time. Since it is a component library designed for React, it suits our needs. However, we do acknowledge that predesigned components may sometimes cause pains especially when it comes to custom styling. To make our life even easier, we also adopted Tailwind CSS. It is a CSS framework providing low-level utility classes that will act as building blocks when we create custom designs.

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Nathan De Pachtere
Fullstack Developer at Alpsify · | 8 upvotes · 60.5K views
Shared insights
on
CSS 3CSS 3HTML5HTML5JavaScriptJavaScript
at

Am I the only one to think that libraries like Bootstrap, Vuetify, Materialize, Foundation are too much sometimes ?

Most of the time you are loading all the library and using 10% of it. And on that 10% you are modifying 90% of it.

I feel like using grid and pure CSS / JS are enough and cleaner.

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Andrew Carpenter
Chief Software Architect at Xelex Digital, LLC · | 16 upvotes · 278.1K views

In 2015 as Xelex Digital was paving a new technology path, moving from ASP.NET web services and web applications, we knew that we wanted to move to a more modular decoupled base of applications centered around REST APIs.

To that end we spent several months studying API design patterns and decided to use our own adaptation of CRUD, specifically a SCRUD pattern that elevates query params to a more central role via the Search action.

Once we nailed down the API design pattern it was time to decide what language(s) our new APIs would be built upon. Our team has always been driven by the right tool for the job rather than what we know best. That said, in balancing practicality we chose to focus on 3 options that our team had deep experience with and knew the pros and cons of.

For us it came down to C#, JavaScript, and Ruby. At the time we owned our infrastructure, racks in cages, that were all loaded with Windows. We were also at a point that we were using that infrastructure to it's fullest and could not afford additional servers running Linux. That's a long way of saying we decided against Ruby as it doesn't play nice on Windows.

That left us with two options. We went a very unconventional route for deciding between the two. We built MVP APIs on both. The interfaces were identical and interchangeable. What we found was easily quantifiable differences.

We were able to iterate on our Node based APIs much more rapidly than we were our C# APIs. For us this was owed to the community coupled with the extremely dynamic nature of JS. There were tradeoffs we considered, latency was (acceptably) higher on requests to our Node APIs. No strong types to protect us from ourselves, but we've rarely found that to be an issue.

As such we decided to commit resources to our Node APIs and push it out as the core brain of our new system. We haven't looked back since. It has consistently met our needs, scaling with us, getting better with time as continually pour into and expand our capabilities.

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Pros of C#
Pros of HTML5
  • 335
    Cool syntax
  • 281
    Great lambda support
  • 253
    Great generics support
  • 199
    Language integrated query (linq)
  • 171
    Extension methods
  • 86
    Automatic garbage collection
  • 83
    Properties with get/set methods
  • 76
    Backed by microsoft
  • 64
    Automatic memory management
  • 57
    Amaizing Crossplatform Support
  • 36
    High performance
  • 33
    Beautiful
  • 32
    LINQ
  • 28
    Great ecosystem of community packages with Nuget
  • 23
    Vibrant developer community
  • 17
    Great readability
  • 16
    Dead-simple asynchronous programming with async/await
  • 12
    Strongly typed by default, dynamic typing when needed
  • 12
    Visual Studio - Great IDE
  • 11
    Productive
  • 11
    Open source
  • 9
    Object oriented programming paradigm
  • 9
    Easy separation of config/application code
  • 7
    Operator overloading
  • 7
    Events management using delegates
  • 6
    Conditional compilation
  • 6
    Great community
  • 6
    OOPS simplified with great syntax
  • 5
    Cool
  • 5
    Organized and clean
  • 5
    Unity
  • 5
    Linq expressions
  • 4
    Top level code
  • 4
    Comprehensive platform libraries
  • 4
    Good language to teach OO concepts
  • 4
    High-performance
  • 4
    Coherent language backed by an extensive CLR
  • 3
    Concise syntax, productivity designed
  • 2
    Lovely
  • 1
    Statically typed
  • 1
    Interfaces
  • 0
    Interfaces
  • 446
    New doctype
  • 388
    Local storage
  • 334
    Canvas
  • 284
    Semantic header and footer
  • 238
    Video element
  • 120
    Geolocation
  • 105
    Form autofocus
  • 98
    Email inputs
  • 84
    Editable content
  • 79
    Application caches
  • 10
    Easy to use
  • 9
    Cleaner Code
  • 4
    Easy
  • 4
    Semantical
  • 3
    Websockets
  • 3
    Better
  • 3
    Audio element
  • 3
    Modern
  • 2
    Content focused
  • 2
    Compatible
  • 2
    Portability
  • 2
    Semantic Header and Footer, Geolocation, New Doctype

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Cons of C#
Cons of HTML5
  • 15
    Poor x-platform GUI support
  • 7
    Closed source
  • 7
    Requires DllImportAttribute for getting stuff from unma
  • 6
    Fast and secure
  • 1
    Easy to forget the tags when you're a begginner
  • 1
    Long and winding code

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What is C#?

C# (pronounced "See Sharp") is a simple, modern, object-oriented, and type-safe programming language. C# has its roots in the C family of languages and will be immediately familiar to C, C++, Java, and JavaScript programmers.

What is HTML5?

HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.

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What are some alternatives to C# and HTML5?
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
JavaScript
JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
Golang
Go is expressive, concise, clean, and efficient. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel type system enables flexible and modular program construction. Go compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. It's a fast, statically typed, compiled language that feels like a dynamically typed, interpreted language.
PHP
Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
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