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Bitbucket vs Upsource: What are the differences?

## Key Differences between Bitbucket and Upsource

<Write Introduction here>

1. **IDE Integration**: Bitbucket offers IDE integrations for popular tools like Visual Studio, Atom, and Eclipse, making it easier for developers to work seamlessly within their preferred environment. On the other hand, Upsource provides integration with IntelliJ IDEA only, limiting the options for developers using different IDEs.
2. **Code Review Capabilities**: Bitbucket provides basic code review capabilities that allow for comments and suggestions on code changes. In contrast, Upsource offers more advanced code review features like code intelligence, duplicate code detection, and code inspections to improve code quality and collaboration among team members.
3. **Scalability**: Bitbucket is more suitable for small to medium-sized teams due to its pricing model based on the number of users. In comparison, Upsource is better suited for larger enterprise teams as it offers more robust collaboration and code review features that scale well with growing team sizes.
4. **Version Control System Support**: Bitbucket supports Git and Mercurial for version control, providing flexibility for teams using different systems. Upsource, on the other hand, supports Git repositories only, limiting the options for teams working with Mercurial or other version control systems.
5. **Advanced Search Functionality**: Upsource offers advanced search functionality that allows users to quickly find code snippets, commits, and reviews within the codebase. Bitbucket, on the other hand, has more basic search capabilities, which may be sufficient for smaller teams but lack the robustness required for larger projects.
6. **Integration with Issue Tracking Tools**: Bitbucket integrates seamlessly with JIRA, allowing for better tracking and management of issues related to code changes. While Upsource also offers integration with JIRA, Bitbucket's integration is more seamless and offers a more cohesive workflow between code development and issue tracking.

In Summary, Bitbucket is more suitable for small to medium-sized teams, while Upsource offers more advanced code review features and scalability options for larger enterprise teams.
Advice on Bitbucket and Upsource
Eric Seibert
DevOps at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia · | 6 upvotes · 488K views
Needs advice
on
BitbucketBitbucket
and
GitHub EnterpriseGitHub Enterprise

We are using a Bitbucket server, and due to migration efforts and new Atlassian community license changes, we need to move to a new self-hosted solution. The new data-center license for Atlassian, available in February, will be community provisioned (free). Along with that community license, other technologies will be coming with it (Crucible, Confluence, and Jira). Is there value in a paid-for license to get the GitHub Enterprise? Are the tools that come with it worth the cost?

I know it is about $20 per 10 seats, and we have about 300 users. Have other convertees to Microsoft's tools found it easy to do a migration? Is the toolset that much more beneficial to the free suite that one can get from Atlassian?

So far, free seems to be the winner, and the familiarization with Atlassian implementation and maintenance is understood. Going to GitHub, are there any distinct challenges to be found or any perks to be attained?

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Replies (1)

These are pretty competitive, and to recommend one over the other would require understanding your usage. Also, what other tools you use: for instance, what do you use for Issue-tracking, or for build pipelines. In your case, since you are already using Bitbucket, the question would be: do you have any current pain-points? And, on the other hand, do you already use Atlassian's JIRA, where you'd benefit from the tight integration? So, though I would not recommend one over the other just in general,. But, if Bitbucket fulfills your current use-cases, then there seems to be little motivation to move.

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Hi, I need advice. In my project, we are using Bitbucket hosted on-prem, Jenkins, and Jira. Also, we have restrictions not to use any plugins for code review, code quality, code security, etc., with bitbucket. Now we want to migrate to AWS CodeCommit, which would mean that we can use, let's say, Amazon CodeGuru for code reviews and move to AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodePipeline for build automation in the future rather than using Jenkins.

Now I want advice on below.

  1. Is it a good idea to migrate from Bitbucket to AWS Codecommit?
  2. If we want to integrate Jira with AWS Codecommit, then how can we do this? If a developer makes any changes in Jira, then a build should be triggered automatically in AWS and create a Jira ticket if the build fails. So, how can we achieve this?
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Replies (1)
Sinisha Mihajlovski
Design Lead | Senior Software Developer · | 1 upvotes · 341.5K views
Recommends

Hi Kavita. It would be useful to explain in a bit more detail the integration to Jira you would like to achieve. Some of the Jira plugins will work with any git repository, regardless if its github/bitbucket/gitlab.

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Decisions about Bitbucket and Upsource
Eduardo Fernandez
Software Engineer at Parrot Software, Inc. · | 8 upvotes · 265.7K views

Do you have a K8s cluster and you want to deploy some services to it? Gitlab Auto Devops is key to achieve this without breaking a sweat.

We deploy Go services to our K8S clusters with warp speed thanks to Gitlab and it's Auto Devops pipeline.

I haven't seen tooling like this in any other git cloud provider.

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Elmar Wouters
CEO, Managing Director at Wouters Media · | 7 upvotes · 534K views

I first used BitBucket because it had private repo's, and it didn't disappoint me. Also with the smooth integration of Jira, the decision to use BitBucket as a full application maintenance service was as easy as 1, 2, 3.

I honestly love BitBucket, by the looks, by the UI, and the smooth integration with Tower.

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Weverton Timoteo

Do you review your Pull/Merge Request before assigning Reviewers?

If you work in a team opening a Pull Request (or Merge Request) looks appropriate. However, have you ever thought about opening a Pull/Merge Request when working by yourself? Here's a checklist of things you can review in your own:

  • Pick the correct target branch
  • Make Drafts explicit
  • Name things properly
  • Ask help for tools
  • Remove the noise
  • Fetch necessary data
  • Understand Mergeability
  • Pass the message
  • Add screenshots
  • Be found in the future
  • Comment inline in your changes

Read the blog post for more detailed explanation for each item :D

What else do you review before asking for code review?

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Weverton Timoteo

One of the magic tricks git performs is the ability to rewrite log history. You can do it in many ways, but git rebase -i is the one I most use. With this command, It’s possible to switch commits order, remove a commit, squash two or more commits, or edit, for instance.

It’s particularly useful to run it before opening a pull request. It allows developers to “clean up” the mess and organize commits before submitting to review. If you follow the practice 3 and 4, then the list of commits should look very similar to a task list. It should reveal the rationale you had, telling the story of how you end up with that final code.

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