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AWS CodeCommit

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Fork

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AWS CodeCommit vs Fork: What are the differences?

  1. 1. Hosting and Repository Management: AWS CodeCommit is a fully-managed source control service that makes it easy for teams to host Git repositories, collaborate on code, and manage their software development projects. It provides a secure and scalable platform for storing and versioning your code, with features like access control, repository management, and support for branching and merging. On the other hand, Fork is a Git client for macOS and Windows that allows you to manage your Git repositories and collaborate with your team. While CodeCommit offers hosting and repository management as a service, Fork is a desktop application that provides a user-friendly interface for working with Git repositories.

  2. 2. Integration with AWS services: One of the key advantages of using AWS CodeCommit is its seamless integration with other AWS services. CodeCommit can be easily integrated with services like AWS CodeBuild, AWS CodeDeploy, and AWS CodePipeline, allowing you to automate your software development processes and build a continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline. This integration enables you to use CodeCommit as a central repository for managing your code and deploying it to different environments. In contrast, Fork does not provide direct integration with AWS services, as it is primarily a desktop application for managing Git repositories.

  3. 3. Scalability and Availability: AWS CodeCommit is designed to be highly scalable and available, with built-in redundancy and automatic scaling capabilities. It allows you to store an unlimited number of repositories, and it can handle large codebases and high traffic volumes. CodeCommit also provides automatic backups and disaster recovery features, ensuring that your code is always safe and accessible. Fork, on the other hand, does not offer the same level of scalability and availability, as it relies on the resources of the local machine where it is installed.

  4. 4. Managed Service vs. Desktop Application: AWS CodeCommit is a managed service provided by AWS, which means that AWS takes care of the infrastructure and maintenance tasks. This allows you to focus on your development work without worrying about managing servers or software updates. Fork, on the other hand, is a desktop application that needs to be installed locally on each user's machine. This gives you more control over your development environment but also requires you to manage the installation and updates of the Fork application.

  5. 5. Pricing and Cost Structure: AWS CodeCommit follows AWS's pricing model, where you pay for the storage and data transfer used by your repositories. The pricing is based on the number of active users and the amount of data stored. Fork, on the other hand, is a one-time purchase application with a fixed cost. Once you purchase Fork, you can use it without any additional charges or subscriptions. The cost of Fork is not dependent on the number of users or the size of your codebase.

  6. 6. Collaboration and Teamwork: AWS CodeCommit provides built-in collaboration and teamwork features, such as access control, code reviews, and pull requests. It allows multiple developers to work on the same codebase concurrently and provides a platform for reviewing and approving code changes. Fork, on the other hand, primarily focuses on the individual developer's workflow. While it supports basic collaboration features like branching and merging, it does not have the same level of built-in collaboration tools as CodeCommit.

In Summary, AWS CodeCommit is a fully-managed source control service that offers hosting and repository management, integration with AWS services, scalability and availability, collaboration and teamwork features, and a flexible pricing model. Fork, on the other hand, is a Git client desktop application that provides a user-friendly interface for managing Git repositories but lacks the fully-managed service capabilities and integration with AWS services provided by CodeCommit.

Advice on AWS CodeCommit and Fork

Hi, I need advice. In my project, we are using Bitbucket hosted on-prem, Jenkins, and Jira. Also, we have restrictions not to use any plugins for code review, code quality, code security, etc., with bitbucket. Now we want to migrate to AWS CodeCommit, which would mean that we can use, let's say, Amazon CodeGuru for code reviews and move to AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodePipeline for build automation in the future rather than using Jenkins.

Now I want advice on below.

  1. Is it a good idea to migrate from Bitbucket to AWS Codecommit?
  2. If we want to integrate Jira with AWS Codecommit, then how can we do this? If a developer makes any changes in Jira, then a build should be triggered automatically in AWS and create a Jira ticket if the build fails. So, how can we achieve this?
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Replies (1)
Sinisha Mihajlovski
Design Lead | Senior Software Developer · | 1 upvotes · 322.2K views
Recommends

Hi Kavita. It would be useful to explain in a bit more detail the integration to Jira you would like to achieve. Some of the Jira plugins will work with any git repository, regardless if its github/bitbucket/gitlab.

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Decisions about AWS CodeCommit and Fork

I explored many Git Desktop tools for the Mac and my final decision was to use Fork. What I love about for that it contains three features, I like about a Git Client tool.

It allows * to handle day to day git operations (least important for me as I am cli junkie) * it helps to investigate the history * most important of all, it has a repo manager which many other tools are missing.

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Pros of AWS CodeCommit
Pros of Fork
  • 44
    Free private repos
  • 26
    IAM integration
  • 24
    Pay-As-You-Go Pricing
  • 20
    Amazon feels the most Secure
  • 19
    Repo data encrypted at rest
  • 11
    Faster deployments when using other AWS services
  • 11
    I can make repository by myself if I have AWS account
  • 8
    AWS CodePipeline integration
  • 6
    Codebuild integration
  • 6
    Does not support web hooks yet! :(
  • 4
    Cost Effective
  • 2
    No Git LFS! Dealbreaker for me
  • 2
    Integrated with AWS Ecosystem
  • 2
    Elastic Beanstalk Integration
  • 1
    Integration via SQS/SNS for events (replaces webhooks)
  • 1
    IAM
  • 1
    Open source friendly
  • 1
    Only US Region
  • 1
    Available in Ireland (Dublin) region
  • 1
    CodeDeploy Integration
  • 1
    Issue tracker
  • 1
    CodeCommit Trigger for an AWS Lambda Function
  • 0
    Ui
  • 19
    One of the easiest and fastest git GUIs
  • 14
    Nice UX
  • 13
    Does the job way better than others
  • 13
    Fast, Great support, Does-it-all, blazing fast
  • 11
    Dark theme
  • 9
    Intuitive interactive rebase and conflict resolution UI
  • 9
    Gitflow support
  • 7
    Excellent commit history tree view
  • 5
    This even looks the same as SourceTree
  • 4
    Repository Manager
  • 3
    Built-in developer feedback
  • 3
    Countless quality of life features
  • 2
    Github Notifications
  • 2
    Not buggy, works smoothly
  • 2
    Keyaboard-only
  • 2
    Visual branch history
  • 2
    Reflog support
  • 1
    Git ammend
  • 1
    Smart 'Open in' menu; e.g. explorer, bit, giithub .
  • 1
    Interactive rebase window
  • 1
    Native application
  • 1
    Intuitive merge conflict resolution
  • 1
    Unique Activity Manager shows current/past operations

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Cons of AWS CodeCommit
Cons of Fork
  • 12
    UI sucks
  • 4
    SLOW
  • 3
    No Issue Tracker
  • 2
    Bad diffing/no blame
  • 2
    NO LFS support
  • 2
    No fork
  • 2
    No webhooks
  • 1
    Can't download file from UI
  • 1
    Only time based triggers
  • 0
    Accident-prone UI
  • 2
    Poorly written license
  • 1
    Stability is fragile when looking deeply into history
  • 1
    Merges that require interactive user decision

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What is AWS CodeCommit?

CodeCommit eliminates the need to operate your own source control system or worry about scaling its infrastructure. You can use CodeCommit to securely store anything from source code to binaries, and it works seamlessly with your existing Git tools.

What is Fork?

Manage your repositories without leaving the application. Organize the repositores into categories. Fork's Diff Viewer provides a clear view to spot the changes in your source code quickly.

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What companies use AWS CodeCommit?
What companies use Fork?
See which teams inside your own company are using AWS CodeCommit or Fork.
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What tools integrate with AWS CodeCommit?
What tools integrate with Fork?

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What are some alternatives to AWS CodeCommit and Fork?
GitHub
GitHub is the best place to share code with friends, co-workers, classmates, and complete strangers. Over three million people use GitHub to build amazing things together.
GitLab
GitLab offers git repository management, code reviews, issue tracking, activity feeds and wikis. Enterprises install GitLab on-premise and connect it with LDAP and Active Directory servers for secure authentication and authorization. A single GitLab server can handle more than 25,000 users but it is also possible to create a high availability setup with multiple active servers.
Bitbucket
Bitbucket gives teams one place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private Git repositories. Teams choose Bitbucket because it has a superior Jira integration, built-in CI/CD, & is free for up to 5 users.
GitHub Enterprise
GitHub Enterprise lets developers use the tools they love across the development process with support for popular IDEs, continuous integration tools, and hundreds of third party apps and services.
SVN (Subversion)
Subversion exists to be universally recognized and adopted as an open-source, centralized version control system characterized by its reliability as a safe haven for valuable data; the simplicity of its model and usage; and its ability to support the needs of a wide variety of users and projects, from individuals to large-scale enterprise operations.
See all alternatives