Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

ASP.NET Core

12.2K
2.4K
+ 1
1.6K
Spring Boot

22.1K
20K
+ 1
995
Add tool

Spring Boot vs ASP.NET Core: What are the differences?

Developers describe Spring Boot as "Create Spring-powered, production-grade applications and services with absolute minimum fuss". Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration. On the other hand, ASP.NET Core is detailed as "A cross-platform .NET framework for building modern cloud-based web applications on Windows, Mac, or Linux". A free and open-source web framework, and higher performance than ASP.NET, developed by Microsoft and the community. It is a modular framework that runs on both the full .NET Framework, on Windows, and the cross-platform .NET Core.

Spring Boot and ASP.NET Core can be primarily classified as "Frameworks (Full Stack)" tools.

Spring Boot and ASP.NET Core are both open source tools. Spring Boot with 41.6K GitHub stars and 26.7K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than ASP.NET Core with 13.6K GitHub stars and 3.34K GitHub forks.

Advice on ASP.NET Core and Spring Boot
Eva Maciejko
Needs advice
on
ExpressJSExpressJSLaravelLaravel
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

Hello, I am a fullstack web developer. I have been working for a company with Java/ Spring Boot and client-side JavaScript(mainly jQuery, some AngularJS) for the past 4 years. As I wish to now work as a freelancer, I am faced with a dilemma: which stack to choose given my current knowledge and the state of the market?

I've heard PHP is very popular in the freelance world. I don't know PHP. However, I'm sure it wouldn't be difficult to learn since it has many similarities with Java (OOP). It seems to me that Laravel has similarities with Spring Boot (it's MVC and OOP). Also, people say Laravel works well with Vue.js, which is my favorite JS framework.

On the other hand, I already know the Javascript language, and I like Vue.js, so I figure I could go the fullstack Javascript route with ExpressJS. However, I am not sure if these techs are ripe for freelancing (with regards to RAD, stability, reliability, security, costs, etc.) Is it true that Express is almost always used with MongoDB? Because my experience is mostly with SQL databases.

The projects I would like to work on are custom web applications/websites for small businesses. I have developed custom ERPs before and found that Java was a good fit, except for it taking a long time to develop. I cannot make a choice, and I am constantly switching between trying PHP and Node.js/Express. Any real-world advice would be welcome! I would love to find a stack that I enjoy while doing meaningful freelance coding.

See more
Replies (10)
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

Hi Eva, As you have solid experience with Spring already, you should jump into freelancing with that. It would be quite stressful to start freelancing with a tech stack you don't know well. Then in the background you can keep learning/practicing an alternative and switch over when you are confident enough (eg. 0.5-1 year later). I think you should learn Laravel as you already like it and find it easier. Express has better performance but that is not required for most of the small freelancer projects.

See more
Benoît Hubert
JavaScript Instructor at Wild Code School · | 6 upvotes · 507.3K views
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

I think Patrik and Alex are right: if you're comfortable with Spring Boot already, you'll be more productive right from the start.

If you wish to learn something else besides, both Laravel and Express are good choices. They aren't in the same category of frameworks: Laravel is an all-in-one solution, while Express is more like "build your own stack from different parts". Which implies that you can use whatever you want as a database engine: MySQL or PostgreSQL are perfectly valid choices (in my school, we teach Express with MySQL, because SQL is still a big thing here in France, and a sought-after skill). You can use Sequelize or TypeORM which support all major SQL DBMS.

Express is widely used, but if you're seeking the JavaScript equivalent of Spring Boot or Laravel, you probably want to look at NestJS. The only potential downside is that it's still young, maintained by a small commmunity, compared to those behind Spring Boot and Laravel.

Bottom line: using a stack tech, that you enjoy and are comfortable with, matters. Spring Boot + Vue.js seem perfectly fine to me. But do forget jQuery if you're using Vue.js, React or Angular, because it will definitely bring more harm than good!

See more
Recommends
ExpressJSExpressJS

Looking at current technological trends and rise of JavaScript, you cannot go wrong with JavaScript. - There's an abundance of libraries to get most things done - You can use JavaScript for both the frontend and the backend - this allows you potentially share your logic/models/code across both stacks - A dynamic/interpreted language such as JavaScript is great for serverless (there's somewhat of a trend towards serverless aswell - especially in modern projects) - If you like/need static typing, you can always migrate seemlessly to Typescript - VueJS is a lightweight framework (compared to Angular), it has more GitHub stars and most would argue it's easier to work with (beginner friendly). Additionally most modern webapps do not use JQuery anymore (even though a lot of legacy projects continue to do so). You don't need JQuery if you use Vue/Angular/React

Additionally it doesn't seem like performance is a hugely important metric in your scenario, so JavaScript would suffice.

Note: These are all my opinions and what I've seen in the current market when recently searching for jobs.

See more

Hi as someone who employs and select developers i agree with a lot almost sayed but think of what are your strengths and where you are or better where your customers are. If you search for big enterprise projects spring boot is ok sql is must and html css as well. if you want to go more to internet related companies (like airbnb, what sup, facebook ) or similar (and not asia) then react is a must node js as well. The libraries tools etc which are used you need to adopt fast. If asia then VUE is a must. but if you like small projects with individuals or like wordpress or similar then you can learn php but i think in 2020 it is wasted time. Same for python in that area. and i also see that we often have problem that developer at least must understand docker docker compose better as it works with kubernetes ,.. just my 5 cents

See more
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

I would definitely recommend you to go with Spring Boot + AngularJS + jQuery. Reasons: 1- You have an experience of 4 years with the above-mentioned stack. 2- As you mentioned that you wish to work as a freelancer, your stack is the perfect one for finding good bids with a little less effort than that of PHP + Laravel + Vue.js.

See more
Rubin Thomas
Software Cloud Developer at RUBIN THOMAS · | 4 upvotes · 446.9K views
Recommends
PerlPerlPHPPHPPythonPython

As a developer myself, I would recommend you not to restrict yourself to JAVA, PHP or any other language. New Tools/languages keep coming every day. If you do plan to move to freelancing. PHP has a lot of options in the freelance space and a lot of competition too.

Learning PHP is as simple as learning any other language. It depends merely on your interest.

Personally if you can code, you should not restrict yourself. I have had to code in many languages, PHP, Perl, shell script, Python, Java, Javascript, Ruby etc... I would keep your developing skills and logic, algorithms etc.. and increase your knowledge and experience in the different languages.

I agree with you JAVA is a lot more time consuming. But it also has its enterprise level scope.

At the same time learning a new language should not be a barrier for you to stop exploring what's out there and keeping your skills up to date. Learning new technologies should be your primary focus and getting project out of your stack helps you build a good reputation.

There are many options for you to pursue. Having an open mindset will help you move forward. If you look to learn now, you are setting yourself up for a brighter future.

See more
Alex Spieslechner
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

in order to stay employable, I'd work with something you can deliver with. if I'd be your client and you'd have to get comfortable with a new stack, I would 100% not pay you for this startup time. learn new stuff in your free-time. or set aside time for learning.

that said, if you want to reorientate, php (even though i personally hate it) is extremely wide spread. but so are java and nodejs. so I'm not a fan of that argument... i recommend building something in each language, and see what you enjoy more. for me it was nodejs, because I already enjoy frontend JavaScript, and appreciate the ecosystem and community.

regarding expressjs and mongodb: yes, it is a goto solution for a lot of tutorials, because its as simple as it gets. especially wben using something like monk. BUT if you want to use mysql, posgres or similar, check out TypeORM, Prism or another ORM-like solution. you can use any db with express, and there's plenty of abstraction layers, which make your life easier. but i noticed that expressjs does a lot less "holding hands" compared to .net core (c#), or laravel (php). can be a pro or a con.

See more

I like fullstack freelancers who stacks are clean as one of below

  1. PHP (laravel ) + Jquery + Bootstrap

  2. Python(Django) + Angular JS or VueJS

  3. NODEJS + REACTJS

See more
Recommends
ExpressJSExpressJS

Hey There, I would recommend going fullstack javascript since you already have experience with javascript on the front end it would be very easy to pickup node and express js. You can use sql with node and express if you please, but mongo is pretty easy to get going with.

See more
Ahmed Gamal

Please, try to work with your comfortable stack, here is some recommendation

See more
Slimane Deb
Needs advice
on
NestJSNestJS
and
Spring BootSpring Boot
in

I am currently planning to build a project from scratch. I will be using Angular as front-end framework, but for the back-end I am not sure which framework to use between Spring Boot and NestJS. I have worked with Spring Boot before, but my new project contains a lot of I/O operations, in fact it will show a daily report. I thought about the new Spring Web Reactive Framework but given the idea that Node.js is the most popular on handling non blocking I/O I am planning to start learning NestJS since it is based on Angular philosophy and TypeScript which I am familiar with. Looking forward to hear from you dear Community.

See more
Replies (2)
Recommends
NestJSNestJS

NestJS is an excellent framework (they both are). I would say the fact that you're working with Angular makes NestJS a great match, unless you're splitting front and back end between developers. But even in that case I would still go with NestJS for a new project.

Regarding the single threading point, take a look at PM2 which helps to run Node in multiple processes (we use it with NestJS) https://pm2.keymetrics.io/docs/usage/cluster-mode/

Also regarding web server performance in general this is an interesting post showing how Node with outperform Java in a web situation (be careful though, best to check a few posts to make sure these aren't totally biased benchmarks!): https://www.tandemseven.com/blog/performance-java-vs-node/

See more
Recommends
KotlinKotlin

Node.js has only 1 real thread per process; Java JIT will mostly run faster than JS one; So if it happens to be not only I/O... Why do you need most popular, not simply popular? Does Node.js have tech advantages?

See more
Taimoor Mirza
Associate Software Engineer at Intech Process Automation · | 5 upvotes · 586.7K views
Needs advice
on
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

For context, I currently use JavaScript (React) and Python (Flask) in my daily routine.

I need your help in choosing either Spring Boot or ASP.NET Core. Both frameworks seem to have mature ecosystems. I would like to hear your thoughts on the following points:

  • Difficulty level of both frameworks
  • Level of community support
  • Career prospects i.e do Spring based jobs pay more or vice versa
  • which one will be helpful if I decide to transition towards a more specialized field like data engineering.

I am asking this because it is something that I am also exploring in parallel. I know that Python and #SQL play a huge role in big data.

See more
Replies (4)
Keegan Witt
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

I'll preface this by saying I haven't ever done work on the Microsoft stack, so take this with a grain of salt.

Community support: Java tends to have a more active community (and much more diverse universe of new open source projects) than .Net (related to below).

Difficulty level: I'd say the Java/Spring stack is more difficult because Java developers tend to use more community projects and have to know which ones to choose in which circumstances (e.g. what logging framework to use? What database connection pooling library to use? What testing framework to use). That being said, most decisions you have to make have choices that are vastly more popular than others. My impression is that .NET guys use stuff from the standard library almost exclusively. If it's not provided there, it's a problem they never thought to solve or maybe write their own (usually the former).

Career prospects: I'll get hate for this probably, but Java/Spring has more jobs than .Net. .NET Core even more so because it's new. Most .NET jobs out there are going to be not Core, and not on anything other than Windows. LinkedIn search for jobs in United States shows 97,103 for Java and 36,448 for C#. That's not to say some individual city might not have more .NET than Java, but by and large Java is bigger. Also, .NET is not dying at the same pace as say Ruby on Rails (sorry Rails fans). I'd say it's ticking very slowly lower, maybe even holding steady. I wouldn't say you're screwed career-wise if you choose .NET. C# is also pretty similar to Java from what I've seen, and I know professionals that have transitioned to Java (though interestingly, I don't know any that did the reverse). Several companies have basically no .NET footprint, for example, Amazon, Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter all have Java, but basically no C#.

Specialized fields: Neither Spring or .Net are going to be a thing in a field like data science. That's exclusively Python (some R) for the most part. The only exception being that there is some Java in Hadoop, and Scala in Spark (which runs on the JVM). But I think those are generally more for data products being created, and not data science work. I'm also under the impression this is increasingly less the case than historically. Some other specialties might make Java useful, for example Android development.

In short, Java is the COBOL of the modern enterprise (which is both a good and bad thing). I recommend it to anyone over .NET, but not for technical reasons. It's for reasons related to the questions you asked. There are actually reasons I think CLR and C# are actually better from a technical perspective than Java (unsurprisingly, since they had the benefit of hindsight). But that's not what you were asking about...

See more
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

Spring boot helps you creating microservices in hours, not days and there is a very active community around it with amazing integrations. Check one of the tutorials maybe. At least here in Germany, the job market will be better for Spring Boot as well, there are a lot more companies using Java then C#.

See more
Alexandru Muntean
Java Application Architect at IBM · | 4 upvotes · 397.7K views
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

ASP.NET Core is pretty new while spring boot is very old but with a different name. Spring boot is just a pack of spring packages which make your life easier. I also believe that java community is way stronger than c# community... You can do your job in both frameworks and it's up to you what you choose after-all you're going to work on the project/lead it ... but whatever you choose.. after a few days of investment stick with your decision because in both frameworks you'll encounter challenges :)

See more
Klaus Nji
Staff Software Engineer at SailPoint Technologies · | 3 upvotes · 385.3K views

I’ll echo what others have said here with a few twists.

I have experience with both platforms including Micronaut, a relatively new kid on the block. It all depends on your near term goal. If it is to make money, sure Java jobs pay more generally because there is more hassles when dealing with the entire ecosystem. Like someone said earlier, you have to make a decision at almost every stage of the development cycle from the IDE, dependency resolution framework, logging, serialization, microservice framework etc. There is just too much choice which some may argue is an advantage while others may argue is a distraction and productivity killer. At the end of the day you can build solid systems with both frameworks.

Coming to ASP Core, yes I also agree that options are more streamlined. You’ll be using Visual Studio or Visual Studio code. For dependency management, you’ll be using Nuget. But I disagree with one of the comments above about the lack of choice. In some aspects .NET actually has more choice believe it or not for example choice of ORM. There is entity framework, nhibernate, dapper etc. For J2ee, hibernate reigns supreme although you have JPA. For dependency injection you have many IoC containers like unity, castle Windsor in .NET while you have Guice and maybe a Spring based implementation.

Also C# is technically a better language that Java. That’s not questionable as has also been stated above. Many things are done right obviously by avoiding some of the mistakes made in the underlying architecture surrounding the Java programming language. That’s why Microsoft created c# to begin with. The language is a lot cleaner and allows you to focus on learning core principles and nail down fundamental OO with emphasis on good design. I find too many distractions in the Java ecosystem which takes me away from understanding the core problem I am trying to solve.

So as you can this is not an easy decision and as someone has stated there’s work to do regardless of what technology choice you make.

If your sole purpose is to make a higher base salary, sure pick Spring Boot. If you want to quickly deliver something and iterate, pick ASP Core. I personally use c# for all private projects and proving concepts even though my employer is a Java shop. It allows me to stay focused on solving the problem and not constantly wrestle with issues such as Gradle dependency resolution glitches in IntelliJ.

Given that you can transfer skills from .NET to J2ee I recommend guys to pick up ASP get a couple of services to get a feel web development as you can still get jobs in Java even with that experience. Companies don’t care these days. In fact a lot of companies are going to Go so there’s that too.

Depends on your immediate term goal.

See more
Needs advice
on
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core
and
DjangoDjango

As a medium level .Net programmer trying to implementing a website, I decided to go through the Asp.Net Core. I found some tutorials on the web and started learning; however, I faced a problem. Even though I have been working with .Net and C# (mostly with unity game engine, which led to a quite amazing mobile game, published on a Persian app store) for two years or even more, by start learning Asp.Net Core, I found out that I do not know .Net as much as I expected. There were some things I should have learned before.

I searched for other frameworks, and Django was a popular one. Besides, I have planned to learn Python for machine learning. The website I want to make (with a small team) is nearly similar to Khan Academy. (We are going to use React for front-end)

So, What should I do? Continue working on .Net core with its amazing new features, or start getting into the Python and Django?

Your advice accompanied by reasons will be greatly appreciated!

See more
Replies (6)
Recommends
DjangoDjango

Having worked with many J2EE database applications in the past, I now turn to Django if I can and the project allows it as it is so quick to get up and running. It has a logical workflow and organized structure and it comes with a high level of security (if you import the appropriate backends). If you are wanting to incorporate python-based data processing (or cython), it is relatively easy to write a backend plugin. I have found it more stable with updates than other frameworks (particularly compared to the NPM world such as React which so often descends into dependency hell when a version of something is updated). One hassle worth mentioning is the database migrations support which can sometimes mess up during development but there are workarounds. With a React frontend, you would be using the Django REST Framework (https://www.django-rest-framework.org/) so you may find that you have to overwrite a lot of the methods here as the defaults are fairly basic CRUD operations which don't really support nested relationships very well. I don't have any experience with .Net so I can't give a comparison except of course, the obvious one, portability, as Python is platform-independent. PS, I would recommend Vue over React also for a well organized front-end.

See more
Recommends
DjangoDjango

I find myself in the opposite boat, I have made commercial websites with Django and now find myself learning ASP.NET. My recommendation comes with the following caveats... regardless of direction the learning will happen. Django is a very battery included framework, so the initial process will be painless, I found that documentation and support for more advanced use cases to be fairly easy to get support.

I personally found Django pretty nice to work with.

See more
Recommends
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core

You can get done what you want with just about any modern framework and language.

Django is fast and easy to learn but as your website grows you will need more and more community apps whose release cycles do not keep up with Django. Unless you are willing to work on the community apps, Django may not be for you.

Compare the active community sizes of Django apps to Ruby on Rails apps and you'll see very active communities with Ruby on Rails and small Django communities. Don't switch to Ruby on Rails though--it is a small, dying community of enthusiasts.

ASP.NET Core is a great backend framework, the community is large and you can always find answers; however, according to the StackOverflow developer survey, it is not desirable for the majority of programmers. I still use it though because my background evolved from C to C++ and then to C#. I also like the Microsoft world.

I've programmed a lot using Angular and some React but am switching to Vue.js which is much easier to learn and faster to code in. Be sure to use TypeScript with Vue.js. Just watch the video on the Vue home page to see how fast he can code using Vue.

But do you really want to code a website from scratch? If not, try WordPress Elementor. It may save you tons of time.

For mobile, use Google Flutter. In my 35 years of professional programming I've never seen anything more elegant, easy to learn, well documented and beautiful than Flutter. From one a single base you can target both Android and IOS and soon Web. You can also develop in Android Studio which means your screen real estate requirements are small so you don't need two monitors.

See more
Recommends
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core

Go with the ASP.NET Core. It is a very mature technology now and there are tons of documentation, tutorials and support you can find online. Also ASP.NET Core Web API plays quite well with the React. It is easy to implement the entire back-end in .NET Core (APIs, authentication, database access layer...) and if you need any third party package, I'm pretty sure you will find and implement in a form of a NuGet package. Who knows, maybe one day you'll need to create a mobile app and with a fully functional Web API, it would be more-less easy task to build a mobile app on top of it.

See more
Recommends
FirebaseFirebase

I recommend you use a framework such as Firebase instead of implementing your own backend server for the website.

I found that Firebase enables me to build websites more quickly since it takes care of the backend for me so most of my development time is building the front-end (using React in your case).

See more
Ilya Lebedev
Recommends
DjangoDjango

If you're going to learn Python anyway, Django project will boost your learning process. Since you're going to use React , you only neet to create REST API. Basic API can be created with Django rather easy.

See more
Needs advice
on
Android SDKAndroid SDKDjangoDjango
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

I've just finished my Masters degree and I am looking at routes into developing my Java knowledge.

The University I studied at requested that all practical Java assignments were done in Java Swing and as such I have a strong understanding in that area of development. Looking at job prospects, many employers are now looking for Java Spring or Android developers.

The plan is to move away from Java SE and skill up in Android development. I was planning on learning Spring Boot to gain exposure in web application development, however looking at StackShare, Django seems to be the more attractive choice for developers.

Does anyone have any advice on which routes/stacks would be the most advisable to adopt. If Spring is not receiving as much exposure or support as Django, is it worth adding to my stack?

See more
Replies (2)
Jeffrey Dabo
Software Engineer at Jeffrey Dabo · | 7 upvotes · 408.7K views
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

Though Java is a strong language and basically the first language to be used in Mobile Development (Android), the framework Spring Boot is not as modern as the Django framework which is based on one of the most popular languages today - Python. Moreover the Python language is far more simpler in syntax and just as powerful as Java. However, Java has scaled up it's performance and the Spring Boot framework can support dynamic web development as well as android development. Whichever way you choose to go, there will be no regrets - trust me.

See more
Recommends
Spring BootSpring Boot

Spring is generally more an enterprise solution, while I see Django being more startup oriented. Django is lightweight and fast (development time, not runtime!). Spring seems to have more focus on microservice architecture than django, if that matters to you at all. Starting your project in Django, it automatically creates a backend 'admin panel' for you to use and customize. You will not find this in the more serious Spring Boot.

See more
Needs advice
on
Node.jsNode.js
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

Hi, I am looking to select tech stack for front end and back end development. Considering Spring Boot vs Node.js for developing microservices. Front end tech stack is selected as React framework. Both of them are equally good for me, long term perspective most of services will be more based on I/O vs heavy computing. Leaning toward node.js, but will require team to learn this tech stack, so little hesitant.

See more
Replies (1)
Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 10 upvotes · 353.7K views
Recommends
Node.jsNode.js
at

It's probably worth investing some time for your team to learn Node.js. There's very little overhead, especially with a framework like ExpressJS, so if your team is familiar with JavaScript it should be a quick process.

It handles I/O really well out of the box, and has a strong community with great open source libraries. Since you're using React on the front end, there's also some benefit to being able to use JavaScript throughout your stack.

See more
Needs advice
on
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core
and
DjangoDjango

I have a mission to make a web application for my organization (engineering consultant). With the following bullet points that the new web app has to cover, what is the right tool?

  1. It should be able to display employee data and project data. For example, when searching the name of Mr. Peter Parker, I should be able to click on the name to see his personal profile and also a list of construction projects he is or was a part of. Also, if I click on a project name, say Project ABC building, it should show me the detail of this project (who is the client, who works on this project, where, start-finish dates, etc.)

  2. It should be able to sync with the database from Microsoft Access.

(optional) 3. The user of this web app should be able to propose a rotation of role (Ex. Boss might want Mr. Peter Paker to work in another project next month, he can just drag Peter into XYZ Building.)

See more
Replies (4)
Mohammad Hossein Amri
Chief Technology Officer at Planally · | 8 upvotes · 194.8K views
Recommends
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core

you can achieve what you want with both. but for me, the obvious choice is Aspnet core. the main reason is being the easiness of writing code in a multi-threading manner & ORM. the Django ORM is ugly as hell that I don't even want to look into its code. I did a couple of projects with Django and I wish I never did it. the amount of nuances was so much that after we delivered the projects I rejected any new Django project. I know people still using that and getting projects done but it's not a clever choice when there are easier choices out there.

moreover, after the latest upgrade, the Aspnet core 3 is the fastest and best of framework in 2020.

See more
George Krachtopoulos
Recommends
DjangoDjango

I always use Django on my projects. It is really easy and friendly fro the developer. It also comes with an inbuilt admin panel where you can manage all your models (tables), Django has a great authentication and authorization system, and it provides a great and powerful URL dispatcher, suitable for your needs. Furthermore, you can use a called django-pyodbc that is coded specifically for Microsoft SQL Server, and the SQL dialects for SQL Server ("T-SQL") and Access ("Access SQL"). However, I would not recommend using an Access DataBase with any web application's backend. Of course, it depends if you explicitly have Microsoft as your main tech stack.

Hope I helped you, and good luck with your project!

See more
Paresh Kadam
Software Developer at Tavisca · | 4 upvotes · 194.3K views
Recommends
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core

Would recommend Asp.net core with angular, It would integrate fine. I have experienced Django its good for fast, short span projects. But when it comes to speed, maintainability Asp .net is a winner. Though you can use angular/react in both frameworks. Your application consists of crud operations so you can have a choice based upon availability of resource, maintenance and time

See more
Recommends
ASP.NET CoreASP.NET Core

Short answer, ASP.NET because of #2. I think the Microsoft stack, now and in the future will be easier to sync with Microsoft Access. I haven't done extensive research but usually Microsoft office apps work well with the MSFT stack. BUT I personally prefer Django.

See more
Needs advice
on
LaravelLaravel
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

The problem I have is: build a scalable backend API decoupled as much as possible from the frontend. And more in general, to build a Web application using some kind of frontend. I would like to compare mainly Liferay with Spring Boot

The most important factors for me are: scalable backend, API documentation, TDD, integration with frontend application for modern reactive interaction

See more
Replies (3)
Povilas Brilius
PHP Web Developer at GroundIn Software · | 5 upvotes · 199.4K views
Recommends
LaravelLaravel
at

It's a general development question, be more specific, because /dev/std... is a generic approach, not a targeted development. You want to develop PHP or Java? Both are good in their terms, but it's your decision. For PHP Laravel is a robust and exhaustive console enabled framework, featuring rich integrations with virtualization & REST. On the other hand, Spring will bring you learning curve if you are switching from PHP and so on. Try to match your needs with project requirements, it will be easier.

See more
Stephen Fox
Artificial Intelligence Fellow · | 3 upvotes · 199.3K views
Recommends
LaravelLaravel

Laravel is lighter weight. Spring Boot quickly becomes a handful, as you'll be downloading hundreds of megabytes in dependencies for a few functions and a dynamic dependency there. There are multiple problems that are solved by "download and put it on your classpath by whatever means. Spring framework will automatically detect it and resolve the issue". It's magical when things work, but my teams have constantly found the limits of the framework's utility and starting points of their burden.

While my expertise with Laravel is more limited, I haven't seen this kind of mess in that community and God bless 'em for it.

See more
Brian Chief Obare
Chief Technology Officer at https://www.chiefbrob.info · | 1 upvotes · 198.9K views
Recommends
LaravelLaravel

Laravel all the way. i like the documentation, simplicity, and scalability

See more
Decisions about ASP.NET Core and Spring Boot
Alexander Krylkov
Sofrware Architect at Air Astana · | 2 upvotes · 163.9K views

Comparing to ASP.NET Core MVC or ASP.NET Core Web API Simplify.Web allows you to easily build your web-site or REST API without any additional/complicated setup, covering cases like localization by default. It's projects structure very lightweight, just a minimum amount of what you need to setup ASP.NET Core request pipeline.

It is build on top of Simplify.DI IOC container abstraction, no dependency on Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection and it's syntax. You can easily switch between DryIoc, SimpleInjector, CastleWindsor etc.

Any internal module of Simplify.Web can be easily replaced on extended by your custom module, covering your custom cases.

For HTML pages generation Simplify.Templates can be used allowing you to use just regular plain HTML without additional setup.

Can be easily integrated with Simplify.WindowsServices converting your web application not just to web-application, but a standalone windows service which can also do some background jobs via Simplify.WindowsServices.

And it is open source, of course :)

See more

There has been a lot of buzz around having PostgreSQL for ASP.NET Core 3.1 web apps. But Configuring Identity Server 4 with PostgreSQL is a real challenge. I've made a simple video to configure the ASP.NET Core 3.1 based Web application that uses AngualrJS as front end with Single Page App capabilities with Identity Server 4 talking to the PostgreSQL database. Check out this Video tutorial on how to do that in detail http://bit.ly/2EkotL5 You can access the entire code here on github http://bit.ly/35okpFj

See more
Get Advice from developers at your company using StackShare Enterprise. Sign up for StackShare Enterprise.
Learn More
Pros of ASP.NET Core
Pros of Spring Boot
  • 134
    C#
  • 112
    Performance
  • 91
    Open source
  • 87
    NuGet
  • 82
    Easy to learn and use
  • 80
    Productive
  • 75
    Visual Studio
  • 71
    Fast
  • 68
    Fast Performance With Microservices
  • 64
    Easily Expose API
  • 62
    Cross Platform
  • 60
    Scalable
  • 59
    Rapid Development
  • 53
    Web Apps
  • 44
    Visual Studio Code
  • 43
    Easy to learn
  • 38
    Azure Integration
  • 37
    MVC
  • 33
    Professionally Developed Packages
  • 31
    Great MVC and templating engine with Razor
  • 30
    Signalr
  • 30
    Razor Pages
  • 29
    Dependency Injection
  • 25
    JetBrains Rider
  • 24
    Easy to start
  • 23
    Tooling
  • 19
    MVVM
  • 19
    One stop shop
  • 15
    Fantastic and caring community
  • 11
    Add a pro
  • 9
    High Performance
  • 8
    Linux Support
  • 3
    Native AOT
  • 2
    Integration test easy & reliable
  • 2
    Free
  • 2
    WASI/WAGI
  • 2
    Easy tooling to deploy on container
  • 141
    Powerful and handy
  • 132
    Easy setup
  • 124
    Java
  • 90
    Spring
  • 85
    Fast
  • 46
    Extensible
  • 37
    Lots of "off the shelf" functionalities
  • 32
    Cloud Solid
  • 26
    Caches well
  • 24
    Many receipes around for obscure features
  • 24
    Productive
  • 23
    Integrations with most other Java frameworks
  • 23
    Modular
  • 22
    Spring ecosystem is great
  • 21
    Fast Performance With Microservices
  • 20
    Auto-configuration
  • 18
    Community
  • 17
    Easy setup, Community Support, Solid for ERP apps
  • 15
    One-stop shop
  • 14
    Cross-platform
  • 14
    Easy to parallelize
  • 13
    Powerful 3rd party libraries and frameworks
  • 13
    Easy setup, good for build erp systems, well documented
  • 12
    Easy setup, Git Integration
  • 5
    It's so easier to start a project on spring
  • 4
    Kotlin

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of ASP.NET Core
Cons of Spring Boot
  • 5
    Great Doc
  • 3
    Fast
  • 2
    Clean
  • 2
    Professionally written Nuget Packages, vs IMPORT junk
  • 1
    Long polling is difficult to implement
  • 23
    Heavy weight
  • 17
    Annotation ceremony
  • 13
    Java
  • 11
    Many config files needed
  • 5
    Reactive
  • 4
    Excellent tools for cloud hosting, since 5.x

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is ASP.NET Core?

A free and open-source web framework, and higher performance than ASP.NET, developed by Microsoft and the community. It is a modular framework that runs on both the full .NET Framework, on Windows, and the cross-platform .NET Core.

What is Spring Boot?

Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

What companies use ASP.NET Core?
What companies use Spring Boot?
See which teams inside your own company are using ASP.NET Core or Spring Boot.
Sign up for StackShare EnterpriseLearn More

Sign up to get full access to all the companiesMake informed product decisions

What tools integrate with ASP.NET Core?
What tools integrate with Spring Boot?

Sign up to get full access to all the tool integrationsMake informed product decisions

Blog Posts

Vue.jsSpring BootUnity+7
2
1074
What are some alternatives to ASP.NET Core and Spring Boot?
ASP.NET
.NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications.
Django
Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
React
Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.
Blazor
Blazor is a .NET web framework that runs in any browser. You author Blazor apps using C#/Razor and HTML.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
See all alternatives