Alternatives to OData logo

Alternatives to OData

REST, GraphQL, JSON, Oracle PL/SQL, and Oracle PL/SQL are the most popular alternatives and competitors to OData.
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What is OData and what are its top alternatives?

It is an ISO/IEC approved, OASIS standard that defines a set of best practices for building and consuming RESTful APIs. It helps you focus on your business logic while building RESTful APIs without having to worry about the various approaches to define request and response headers, status codes, HTTP methods, URL conventions, media types, payload formats, query options, etc.
OData is a tool in the Query Languages category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to OData

  • REST
    REST

    An architectural style for developing web services. A distributed system framework that uses Web protocols and technologies. ...

  • GraphQL
    GraphQL

    GraphQL is a data query language and runtime designed and used at Facebook to request and deliver data to mobile and web apps since 2012. ...

  • JSON
    JSON

    JavaScript Object Notation is a lightweight data-interchange format. It is easy for humans to read and write. It is easy for machines to parse and generate. It is based on a subset of the JavaScript Programming Language. ...

  • Oracle PL/SQL
    Oracle PL/SQL

    It is a powerful, yet straightforward database programming language. It is easy to both write and read, and comes packed with lots of out-of-the-box optimizations and security features. ...

  • Oracle PL/SQL
    Oracle PL/SQL

    It is a powerful, yet straightforward database programming language. It is easy to both write and read, and comes packed with lots of out-of-the-box optimizations and security features. ...

  • Prisma
    Prisma

    Prisma is an open-source database toolkit. It replaces traditional ORMs and makes database access easy with an auto-generated query builder for TypeScript & Node.js. ...

  • JSON API
    JSON API

    It is most widely used data format for data interchange on the web. This data interchange can happen between two computers applications at different geographical locations or running within same hardware machine. ...

  • Graphene
    Graphene

    Graphene is a Python library for building GraphQL schemas/types fast and easily. ...

OData alternatives & related posts

REST logo

REST

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A software architectural style
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PROS OF REST
  • 3
    Popularity
CONS OF REST
    Be the first to leave a con

    related REST posts

    GraphQL logo

    GraphQL

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    A data query language and runtime
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    PROS OF GRAPHQL
    • 74
      Schemas defined by the requests made by the user
    • 62
      Will replace RESTful interfaces
    • 60
      The future of API's
    • 48
      The future of databases
    • 12
      Self-documenting
    • 11
      Get many resources in a single request
    • 5
      Ask for what you need, get exactly that
    • 4
      Query Language
    • 3
      Evolve your API without versions
    • 3
      Fetch different resources in one request
    • 3
      Type system
    • 2
      GraphiQL
    • 2
      Ease of client creation
    • 2
      Easy setup
    • 1
      Good for apps that query at build time. (SSR/Gatsby)
    • 1
      Backed by Facebook
    • 1
      Easy to learn
    • 1
      "Open" document
    • 1
      Better versioning
    • 1
      Standard
    • 1
      1. Describe your data
    • 1
      Fast prototyping
    CONS OF GRAPHQL
    • 4
      Hard to migrate from GraphQL to another technology
    • 4
      More code to type.
    • 2
      Takes longer to build compared to schemaless.
    • 1
      All the pros sound like NFT pitches
    • 1
      Works just like any other API at runtime

    related GraphQL posts

    Shared insights
    on
    Node.jsNode.jsGraphQLGraphQLMongoDBMongoDB

    I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

    For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

    1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

    2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

    3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

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    Nick Rockwell
    SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 44 upvotes · 2.1M views

    When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

    So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

    React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

    Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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    JSON logo

    JSON

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    A lightweight data-interchange format
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    PROS OF JSON
    • 4
      Widely supported
    • 4
      Simple
    CONS OF JSON
      Be the first to leave a con

      related JSON posts

      Ali Soueidan
      Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 18 upvotes · 931.6K views

      Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

      For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

      To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

      DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

      Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

      *Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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      I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

      • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

      • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

      • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

      • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

      • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console output inspector. The project navigator sidebar is simple and powerful: you can manage your files and folders with ease. The command palette helps you find commands by text. The search widget has a powerful auto-complete feature to search and find your files.

      • Extensible and configurable: There are many extensions available for every language supported, including syntax highlighters, IntelliSense and code completion, and debuggers. There are also extension to manage application configuration and architecture like Docker and Jenkins.

      • Integrated with Git: You can visually manage your project repositories, pull, commit and push your changes, and easy conflict resolution.( there is support for SVN (Subversion) users by plugin)

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      Oracle PL/SQL logo

      Oracle PL/SQL

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      It is a combination of SQL along with the procedural features of programming languages
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      PROS OF ORACLE PL/SQL
      • 2
        Multiple ways to accomplish the same end
      • 2
        Powerful
      • 1
        Not mysql
      • 1
        Massive, continuous investment by Oracle Corp
      • 1
        Extensible to external langiages
      • 1
        Pl/sql
      CONS OF ORACLE PL/SQL
      • 2
        High commercial license cost

      related Oracle PL/SQL posts

      Oracle PL/SQL logo

      Oracle PL/SQL

      626
      486
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      It is a combination of SQL along with the procedural features of programming languages
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      8
      PROS OF ORACLE PL/SQL
      • 2
        Multiple ways to accomplish the same end
      • 2
        Powerful
      • 1
        Not mysql
      • 1
        Massive, continuous investment by Oracle Corp
      • 1
        Extensible to external langiages
      • 1
        Pl/sql
      CONS OF ORACLE PL/SQL
      • 2
        High commercial license cost

      related Oracle PL/SQL posts

      Prisma logo

      Prisma

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      Modern Database Access for TypeScript & Node.js
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      PROS OF PRISMA
      • 11
        Type-safe database access
      • 10
        Open Source
      • 8
        Auto-generated query builder
      • 6
        Supports multible database systems
      • 6
        Increases confidence during development
      • 4
        Built specifically for Postgres and TypeScript
      • 4
        Productive application development
      • 2
        Supports multible RDBMSs
      • 1
        Robust migrations system
      CONS OF PRISMA
      • 1
        Doesn't support downward/back migrations

      related Prisma posts

      Divine Bawa
      at PayHub Ghana Limited · | 16 upvotes · 337.8K views

      I just finished a web app meant for a business that offers training programs for certain professional courses. I chose this stack to test out my skills in graphql and react. I used Node.js , GraphQL , MySQL for the #Backend utilizing Prisma as a database interface for MySQL to provide CRUD APIs and graphql-yoga as a server. For the #frontend I chose React, styled-components for styling, Next.js for routing and SSR and Apollo for data management. I really liked the outcome and I will definitely use this stack in future projects.

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      Munkhtegsh Munkhbat
      Software Engineer Consultant at LoanSnap · | 9 upvotes · 169.2K views

      In my last side project, I built a web posting application that has similar features as Facebook and hosted on Heroku. The user can register an account, create posts, upload images and share with others. I took an advantage of graphql-subscriptions to handle realtime notifications in the comments section. Currently, I'm at the last stage of styling and building layouts.

      For the #Backend I used graphql-yoga, Prisma, GraphQL with PostgreSQL database. For the #FrontEnd: React, styled-components with Apollo. The app is hosted on Heroku.

      See more
      JSON API logo

      JSON API

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      One of many data formats that is often applied to REST
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      PROS OF JSON API
        Be the first to leave a pro
        CONS OF JSON API
          Be the first to leave a con

          related JSON API posts

          Graphene logo

          Graphene

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          GraphQL framework for Python
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          PROS OF GRAPHENE
          • 0
            Will replace RESTful interfaces
          • 0
            The future of API's
          CONS OF GRAPHENE
            Be the first to leave a con

            related Graphene posts

            Malthe Jørgensen

            We recently switched from MongoDB and the Python library MongoEngine to PostgreSQL and Django in order to:

            • Better leverage GraphQL (using the Graphene library)
            • Allow us to use the autogenerated Django admin interface
            • Allow better performance due to the way some of our pages present data
            • Give us more a mature stack in the form of Django replacing MongoEngine, which we had some issues with in the past.

            MongoDB was hosted on mlab, and we now host Postgres on Amazon RDS .

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            Michael Mota
            Founder at AlterEstate · | 6 upvotes · 73K views

            We recently implemented GraphQL because we needed to build dynamic reports based on the user preference and configuration, this was extremely complicated with our actual RESTful API, the code started to get harder to maintain but switching to GraphQL helped us to to build beautiful reports for our clients that truly help them make data-driven decisions.

            Our goal is to implemented GraphQL in the whole platform eventually, we are using Graphene , a python library for Django .

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