Alternatives to OAuth2 logo

Alternatives to OAuth2

OpenID Connect, Auth0, JSON Web Token, Amazon Cognito, and Keycloak are the most popular alternatives and competitors to OAuth2.
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What is OAuth2 and what are its top alternatives?

It is an authorization framework that enables a third-party application to obtain limited access to an HTTP service, either on behalf of a resource owner by orchestrating an approval interaction between the resource owner and the HTTP service, or by allowing the third-party application to obtain access on its own behalf.
OAuth2 is a tool in the User Management and Authentication category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to OAuth2

  • OpenID Connect
    OpenID Connect

    It is a simple identity layer on top of the OAuth 2.0 protocol. It allows Clients to verify the identity of the End-User based on the authentication performed by an Authorization Server, as well as to obtain basic profile information about the End-User in an interoperable and REST-like manner. ...

  • Auth0
    Auth0

    A set of unified APIs and tools that instantly enables Single Sign On and user management to all your applications. ...

  • JSON Web Token
    JSON Web Token

    JSON Web Token is an open standard that defines a compact and self-contained way for securely transmitting information between parties as a JSON object. This information can be verified and trusted because it is digitally signed. ...

  • Amazon Cognito
    Amazon Cognito

    You can create unique identities for your users through a number of public login providers (Amazon, Facebook, and Google) and also support unauthenticated guests. You can save app data locally on users’ devices allowing your applications to work even when the devices are offline. ...

  • Keycloak
    Keycloak

    It is an Open Source Identity and Access Management For Modern Applications and Services. It adds authentication to applications and secure services with minimum fuss. No need to deal with storing users or authenticating users. It's all available out of the box. ...

  • Spring Security
    Spring Security

    It is a framework that focuses on providing both authentication and authorization to Java applications. The real power of Spring Security is found in how easily it can be extended to meet custom requirements. ...

  • Firebase Authentication
    Firebase Authentication

    It provides backend services, easy-to-use SDKs, and ready-made UI libraries to authenticate users to your app. It supports authentication using passwords, phone numbers, popular federated identity providers like Google, ...

  • Devise
    Devise

    Devise is a flexible authentication solution for Rails based on Warden

OAuth2 alternatives & related posts

OpenID Connect logo

OpenID Connect

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103
0
An authorization framework
143
103
+ 1
0
PROS OF OPENID CONNECT
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF OPENID CONNECT
      Be the first to leave a con

      related OpenID Connect posts

      Auth0 logo

      Auth0

      1.2K
      1.8K
      212
      Token-based Single Sign On for your Apps and APIs with social, databases and enterprise identities
      1.2K
      1.8K
      + 1
      212
      PROS OF AUTH0
      • 68
        JSON web token
      • 31
        Integration with 20+ Social Providers
      • 20
        It's a universal solution
      • 20
        SDKs
      • 14
        Amazing Documentation
      • 11
        Heroku Add-on
      • 8
        Enterprise support
      • 7
        Extend platform with "rules"
      • 7
        Great Sample Repos
      • 4
        Azure Add-on
      • 3
        Passwordless
      • 3
        Easy integration, non-intrusive identity provider
      • 2
        It can integrate seamlessly with firebase
      • 2
        Great documentation, samples, UX and Angular support
      • 2
        Polished
      • 2
        On-premise deployment
      • 1
        Will sign BAA for HIPAA-compliance
      • 1
        Springboot
      • 1
        Active Directory support
      • 1
        SAML Support
      • 1
        SOC2
      • 1
        Great support
      • 1
        MFA
      • 1
        OpenID Connect (OIDC) Support
      CONS OF AUTH0
      • 14
        Pricing too high (Developer Pro)
      • 7
        Poor support
      • 4
        Status page not reflect actual status
      • 3
        Rapidly changing API

      related Auth0 posts

      Stephen Gheysens
      Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 818.4K views

      Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

      My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

      See more

      Hey all, We're currently weighing up the pros & cons of using Firebase Authentication vs something more OTB like Auth0 or Okta to manage end-user access management for a consumer digital content product. From what I understand so far, Something like Firebase Auth would require more dev effort but is likely to cost less overall, whereas OTB, you have a UI-based console which makes config by non-technical business users easier to manage. Does anyone else have any intuitions or experiences they could share on this, please? Thank you!

      See more
      JSON Web Token logo

      JSON Web Token

      999
      265
      0
      A JSON-based open standard for creating access tokens
      999
      265
      + 1
      0
      PROS OF JSON WEB TOKEN
        Be the first to leave a pro
        CONS OF JSON WEB TOKEN
          Be the first to leave a con

          related JSON Web Token posts

          Repost

          Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

          Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

          Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

          Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

          See more

          Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku. However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

          Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

          Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

          Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

          See more
          Amazon Cognito logo

          Amazon Cognito

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          815
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          Securely manage and synchronize app data for your users across their mobile devices
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          PROS OF AMAZON COGNITO
          • 14
            Backed by Amazon
          • 7
            Manage Unique Identities
          • 4
            Work Offline
          • 3
            MFA
          • 2
            Store and Sync
          • 1
            It works
          • 1
            Integrate with Google, Amazon, Twitter, Facebook, SAML
          • 1
            SDKs and code samples
          • 1
            Free for first 50000 users
          CONS OF AMAZON COGNITO
          • 4
            Massive Pain to get working
          • 3
            Documentation often out of date
          • 2
            Login-UI sparsely customizable (e.g. no translation)
          • 1
            Docs are vast but mostly useless
          • 1
            MFA: there is no "forget device" function
          • 1
            Difficult to customize (basic-pack is more than humble)
          • 1
            Lacks many basic features
          • 1
            There is no "Logout" method in the API
          • 1
            No recovery codes for MFA
          • 1
            Hard to find expiration times for tokens/codes
          • 1
            Only paid support

          related Amazon Cognito posts

          I'm starting a new React Native project and trying to decide on an auth provider. Currently looking at Auth0 and Amazon Cognito. It will need to play nice with a Django Rest Framework backend.

          See more
          Keycloak logo

          Keycloak

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          77
          An open source identity and access management solution
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          77
          PROS OF KEYCLOAK
          • 27
            It's a open source solution
          • 20
            Supports multiple identity provider
          • 13
            OpenID and SAML support
          • 8
            Easy customisation
          • 7
            JSON web token
          • 2
            Maintained by devs at Redhat
          CONS OF KEYCLOAK
          • 5
            Okta
          • 4
            Lack of Code examples for client side
          • 4
            Poor client side documentation

          related Keycloak posts

          Joshua Dean Küpper
          CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 7 upvotes · 536.7K views

          As the access to our global REST-API "Charon" is bound to OAuth2, we use Keycloak inside Quarkus to authenticate and authorize users of our API. It is not possible to perform any un-authenticated requests against this API, so we wanted to make really sure that the authentication/authorization component is absolutely reliable and tested. We found those attributes within Keycloak, so we used it.

          See more
          Shared insights
          on
          OktaOktaKeycloakKeycloak

          I want some good advice on which one I should prefer. (Keycloak or Okta) Since Keycloak is open source, it will be our first preference, but do we face some limitations with this approach? And since our product is SAAS based and we support the following authentications at present. 1. AT DB level 2. 3rd part IDP providers 3. LDAP/AD...

          See more
          Spring Security logo

          Spring Security

          463
          472
          5
          A powerful and highly customizable authentication and access-control framework
          463
          472
          + 1
          5
          PROS OF SPRING SECURITY
          • 3
            Java integration
          • 2
            Easy to use
          CONS OF SPRING SECURITY
            Be the first to leave a con

            related Spring Security posts

            Firebase Authentication logo

            Firebase Authentication

            439
            515
            52
            An App Authentication System In A Few Lines Of Code
            439
            515
            + 1
            52
            PROS OF FIREBASE AUTHENTICATION
            • 11
              Completely Free
            • 8
              Native App + Web integrations
            • 8
              Email/Password
            • 6
              Works seemlessly with other Firebase Services
            • 6
              Passwordless
            • 5
              Integration with OAuth Providers
            • 4
              Anonymous Users
            • 4
              Easy to Integrate and Manage
            CONS OF FIREBASE AUTHENTICATION
            • 4
              Heavy webpack

            related Firebase Authentication posts

            Stephen Gheysens
            Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 818.4K views

            Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

            My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

            See more

            Hey all, We're currently weighing up the pros & cons of using Firebase Authentication vs something more OTB like Auth0 or Okta to manage end-user access management for a consumer digital content product. From what I understand so far, Something like Firebase Auth would require more dev effort but is likely to cost less overall, whereas OTB, you have a UI-based console which makes config by non-technical business users easier to manage. Does anyone else have any intuitions or experiences they could share on this, please? Thank you!

            See more
            Devise logo

            Devise

            375
            221
            56
            Flexible authentication solution for Rails with Warden
            375
            221
            + 1
            56
            PROS OF DEVISE
            • 33
              Reliable
            • 17
              Open Source
            • 4
              Support for neo4j database
            • 2
              Secure
            CONS OF DEVISE
              Be the first to leave a con

              related Devise posts

              Jerome Dalbert
              Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 5 upvotes · 341.6K views
              Shared insights
              on
              OmniAuthOmniAuthDeviseDeviseRubyRuby
              at

              We use OmniAuth with Devise to authenticate users via Twitter, GitHub, Bitbucket and Gitlab. Adding a new OmniAuth authentication provider is basically as easy as adding a new Ruby gem!

              The only drawback I could see is that your OmniAuth+Devise OmniauthCallbacksController redirection logic can easily get hairy over time. So you have to be vigilant to keep it in check.

              See more