Alternatives to CodeIgniter logo

Alternatives to CodeIgniter

Laravel, WordPress, Yii, Symfony, and Kohana are the most popular alternatives and competitors to CodeIgniter.
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What is CodeIgniter and what are its top alternatives?

CodeIgniter is a proven, agile & open PHP web application framework with a small footprint. It is powering the next generation of web apps.
CodeIgniter is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
CodeIgniter is an open source tool with GitHub stars and GitHub forks. Here’s a link to CodeIgniter's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to CodeIgniter

  • Laravel
    Laravel

    It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching. ...

  • WordPress
    WordPress

    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family. ...

  • Yii
    Yii

    Yii comes with: MVC, DAO/ActiveRecord, I18N/L10N, caching, authentication and role-based access control, scaffolding, testing, etc. It can reduce your development time significantly. ...

  • Symfony
    Symfony

    It is written with speed and flexibility in mind. It allows developers to build better and easy to maintain websites with PHP.. ...

  • Kohana
    Kohana

    Kohana is an elegant, open source, and object oriented HMVC framework built using PHP5, by a team of volunteers. It aims to be swift, secure, and small. ...

  • CakePHP
    CakePHP

    It makes building web applications simpler, faster, while requiring less code. A modern PHP 7 framework offering a flexible database access layer and a powerful scaffolding system. ...

  • Django
    Django

    Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. ...

  • React
    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

CodeIgniter alternatives & related posts

Laravel logo

Laravel

27.5K
22.9K
3.9K
A PHP Framework For Web Artisans
27.5K
22.9K
+ 1
3.9K
PROS OF LARAVEL
  • 553
    Clean architecture
  • 392
    Growing community
  • 370
    Composer friendly
  • 344
    Open source
  • 324
    The only framework to consider for php
  • 220
    Mvc
  • 210
    Quickly develop
  • 168
    Dependency injection
  • 156
    Application architecture
  • 143
    Embraces good community packages
  • 73
    Write less, do more
  • 71
    Orm (eloquent)
  • 66
    Restful routing
  • 57
    Database migrations & seeds
  • 55
    Artisan scaffolding and migrations
  • 41
    Great documentation
  • 40
    Awesome
  • 30
    Awsome, Powerfull, Fast and Rapid
  • 29
    Build Apps faster, easier and better
  • 28
    Eloquent ORM
  • 26
    Promotes elegant coding
  • 26
    Modern PHP
  • 26
    JSON friendly
  • 25
    Most easy for me
  • 24
    Easy to learn, scalability
  • 23
    Beautiful
  • 22
    Blade Template
  • 21
    Test-Driven
  • 15
    Security
  • 15
    Based on SOLID
  • 13
    Clean Documentation
  • 13
    Easy to attach Middleware
  • 13
    Cool
  • 12
    Simple
  • 12
    Convention over Configuration
  • 11
    Easy Request Validatin
  • 10
    Simpler
  • 10
    Fast
  • 10
    Easy to use
  • 9
    Get going quickly straight out of the box. BYOKDM
  • 9
    Its just wow
  • 8
    Laravel + Cassandra = Killer Framework
  • 8
    Simplistic , easy and faster
  • 8
    Friendly API
  • 7
    Less dependencies
  • 7
    Super easy and powerful
  • 6
    Great customer support
  • 6
    Its beautiful to code in
  • 5
    Speed
  • 5
    Eloquent
  • 5
    Composer
  • 5
    Minimum system requirements
  • 5
    Laravel Mix
  • 5
    Easy
  • 5
    The only "cons" is wrong! No static method just Facades
  • 5
    Fast and Clarify framework
  • 5
    Active Record
  • 5
    Php7
  • 4
    Ease of use
  • 4
    Laragon
  • 4
    Laravel casher
  • 4
    Easy views handling and great ORM
  • 4
    Laravel Forge and Envoy
  • 4
    Cashier with Braintree and Stripe
  • 3
    Laravel Passport
  • 3
    Laravel Spark
  • 3
    Intuitive usage
  • 3
    Laravel Horizon and Telescope
  • 3
    Laravel Nova
  • 3
    Rapid development
  • 2
    Laravel Vite
  • 2
    Scout
  • 2
    Deployment
  • 1
    Succint sintax
CONS OF LARAVEL
  • 54
    PHP
  • 33
    Too many dependency
  • 23
    Slower than the other two
  • 17
    A lot of static method calls for convenience
  • 15
    Too many include
  • 13
    Heavy
  • 9
    Bloated
  • 8
    Laravel
  • 7
    Confusing
  • 5
    Too underrated
  • 4
    Not fast with MongoDB
  • 1
    Slow and too much big
  • 1
    Not using SOLID principles
  • 1
    Difficult to learn

related Laravel posts

I need to build a web application plus android and IOS apps for an enterprise, like an e-commerce portal. It will have intensive use of MySQL to display thousands (40-50k) of live product information in an interactive table (searchable, filterable), live delivery tracking. It has to be secure, as it will handle information on customers, sales, inventory. Here is the technology stack: Backend: Laravel 7 Frondend: Vue.js, React or AngularJS?

Need help deciding technology stack. Thanks.

See more
David Watson
at Realtime App Solutions · | 15 upvotes · 99K views

Coming from a non-web development environment background, I was a bit lost a first and bewildered by all the varying tools and platforms, and spent much too long evaluating before eventualy deciding on Laravel as the main core of my development.

But as I started development with Laravel that lead me into discovering Vue.js for creating beautiful front-end components that were easy to configure and extend, so I decided to standardise on Vue.js for most of my front-end development.

During my search for additional Vue.js components, a chance comment in a @laravel forum , led me to discover Quasar Framework initially for it's wide range of in-built components ... but once, I realised that Quasar Framework allowed me to use the same codebase to create apps for SPA, PWA, iOS, Android, and Electron then I was hooked.

So, I'm now using mainly just Quasar Framework for all the front-end, with Laravel providing a backend API service to the Front-end apps.

I'm deploying this all to DigitalOcean droplets via service called Moss.sh which deploys my private GitHub repositories directly to DigitalOcean in realtime.

See more
WordPress logo

WordPress

96.2K
38.7K
2.1K
A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability.
96.2K
38.7K
+ 1
2.1K
PROS OF WORDPRESS
  • 415
    Customizable
  • 366
    Easy to manage
  • 354
    Plugins & themes
  • 258
    Non-tech colleagues can update website content
  • 247
    Really powerful
  • 145
    Rapid website development
  • 78
    Best documentation
  • 51
    Codex
  • 44
    Product feature set
  • 35
    Custom/internal social network
  • 18
    Open source
  • 8
    Great for all types of websites
  • 7
    Huge install and user base
  • 5
    Perfect example of user collaboration
  • 5
    Open Source Community
  • 5
    Most websites make use of it
  • 5
    It's simple and easy to use by any novice
  • 5
    Best
  • 5
    I like it like I like a kick in the groin
  • 4
    Community
  • 4
    API-based CMS
  • 3
    Easy To use
  • 2
    <a href="https://secure.wphackedhel">Easy Beginner</a>
CONS OF WORDPRESS
  • 13
    Hard to keep up-to-date if you customize things
  • 13
    Plugins are of mixed quality
  • 10
    Not best backend UI
  • 2
    Complex Organization
  • 1
    Do not cover all the basics in the core
  • 1
    Great Security

related WordPress posts

Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 1.5M views

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

See more
A White
Front End Web Dev at Burnt Design · | 21 upvotes · 57.7K views

Below is my own professional history to give some context to my current skill set. I have been a front-end dev for 18 years. My tools of choice are:

  • HTML5
  • CSS 3
  • JavaScript
  • WordPress
  • PHP (but not my strongest skill as I don't write it too often)

I first of all would like to become a better and more 'full stack' developer, and I have a business idea that will hopefully allow me to move in this direction. The queries I have will result in which approach I take here. One of the most important aspects to me is the system being 'future proof'. If successful I know I will eventually bring additional developers on board, and they will likely be better developers than me! I want to avoid them having to rebuild the system and would like it to be something that they can just expand and improve on.

The business which I'd like to create is the following (in a nutshell), I have ideas for many more features, but this is how I'd like to begin:

Web-based system for gym management & marketing. Specifically a class-based gym

  1. One-stop shop for a class-based gym owner
  2. Sell memberships
  3. Manage class bookings
  4. Reporting
  5. Automatically generated website
  6. Choose a pre-designed template and amend the content through their dashboard
  7. Marketing
  8. Easily send a newsletter to members
  9. Book a free trial form on the website linked directly to the booking system

Important requirements

  1. One system, one dashboard. I would like the gym owner to have one place to control everything. Members, marketing, and website amendments.
  2. Future proof. These features are the bare minimum and I'd like to keep expanding on the features as time goes on. Things like uploading programming for members, messaging between members and admin, and selling merchandise via the website.
  3. Fast to load & secure. I live in the WordPress world right now, which isn't the fastest or most secure environment. I appreciate there are better ways to develop a system like this, but I'm a little clueless about where to start.
  4. Mobile. The data created should easily communicate with a mobile app that customers will download to manage their memberships and class bookings.

TIA to anybody that can provide some guidance on where to start here.

See more
Yii logo

Yii

709
385
311
A high-performance PHP framework best for developing Web 2.0 applications
709
385
+ 1
311
PROS OF YII
  • 42
    Open source
  • 33
    Code generator
  • 33
    Simple
  • 29
    Active record
  • 26
    Full featured
  • 21
    Documentation
  • 21
    High performance
  • 20
    Rapid development
  • 16
    Flexible
  • 11
    Mvc
  • 10
    Not bloated
  • 8
    Stable Release
  • 8
    Community
  • 8
    Amazing
  • 7
    View Helpers
  • 6
    Modular architecture
  • 6
    Long Term Support
  • 5
    Easy setup, easy develop
  • 1
    Easy
CONS OF YII
  • 2
    Unnatural love of arrays
  • 1
    Promotes spagetti code
  • 1
    Too Opinionated
  • 1
    Promotes bad practice

related Yii posts

Buzz Zhang
Shared insights
on
PHPPHPYiiYiiMySQLMySQLPHP-MVCPHP-MVC

Of all PHP frameworks, my best and only choice is Yii . Think of this: you have a MySQL database, it contains several tables. Now you want to setup a PHP-MVC site, firstly, you must create Models, Yii have a very handy tool called Gii, you can easily create model with Gii just by one click, Gii will read your database table columns and create PHP models automatically for you. Now you need Controller, still with Gii, it will automatically create all 4 php files for you with Insert/Delete/Update/Select even with Search function.

Well, now the most modern way is to have a RESTful API, that's even easier with Yii, you even don't need to care about all the columns, just 4 lines of code you can expose your database table as RESTful API with all GET/POST/PUT/DELETE support, even you change your database table columns, you don't need to change any PHP code.

For security, Yii have embedded authentication and RBAC support. For multi language, Yii have embedded i18n support, all with out-of-box. Just play with it, I bet you will love it.

See more
Y. Taborda
Shared insights
on
PHPPHPLumenLumenYiiYiiSlimSlim

I'm about to start a new project to build a REST API, and I got to this point: Yii2 Vs Lumen Vs Slim, I used Yii 1.1 a while a go and it was awesome, really easy to work with, as a developer you don't have to worry about almost anything, just setup the framework, get your php extensions, and start coding your app.

But, I was told about performance and someone recomended Lumen or Slim to work with a micro framework and a less bloated framework, what worries me is the lack of advantages that Yii2 offers, ACF and RBAC as a native tool on the framework, gii, the model validations and all the security props already in it.

Is it worth it? Is the performance so great on those frameworks to leave aside the advantages of a framework like Yii2?

How do you suggest to make the test to prove wich one is better?

PHP Lumen Yii Slim

See more
Symfony logo

Symfony

8K
6K
1.1K
A PHP full-stack web framework
8K
6K
+ 1
1.1K
PROS OF SYMFONY
  • 177
    Open source
  • 149
    Php
  • 130
    Community
  • 129
    Dependency injection
  • 122
    Professional
  • 80
    Doctrine
  • 75
    Organized
  • 71
    Modular architecture
  • 47
    Smart programming
  • 45
    Solid
  • 20
    Documentation
  • 15
    LTS releases
  • 10
    Easy to Learn
  • 9
    Decoupled framework components
  • 9
    Robust
  • 8
    Service container
  • 8
    Bundle
  • 8
    Good practices guideline
  • 7
    Simple
  • 7
    Powerful
  • 6
    Flexible
CONS OF SYMFONY
  • 10
    Too many dependency
  • 8
    Lot of config files
  • 4
    YMAL
  • 3
    Feature creep
  • 1
    Bloated

related Symfony posts

Benjamin Bernard-Bouissières

I really love Django because it is really fast to create a web application from scratch and it has a lot a facilities like the ORM or the Admin module ! The Python language is really easy to read and powerful, that's why I prefer Django over Symfony.

I use Django at work to make tools for the technicians but I also use it for me to build my personal website which I host on PythonAnywhere, and with a domain name bought on Namecheap.

See more

Hello, I'm using Supervisord for separate process manager/consumer with RabbitMQ and Symfony but it's not working properly, it disconnects after a couple of hours.. and for a workaround, I'm using a restart job on Jenkins (as in the linked issue in GitHub) but tbh I would like to have a clean stack.. if anyone knows a better alternative than supervisord it will be awesome..

Many thanks!

See more
Kohana logo

Kohana

59
41
15
An elegant HMVC PHP5 framework
59
41
+ 1
15
PROS OF KOHANA
  • 4
    Open source
  • 3
    Efficient and lightweight
  • 3
    Cascading filesystem
  • 2
    Easy to understand PHP framework
  • 2
    Extensible
  • 1
    A business opportunity
CONS OF KOHANA
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Kohana posts

    CakePHP logo

    CakePHP

    661
    398
    137
    The Rapid Development Framework for PHP
    661
    398
    + 1
    137
    PROS OF CAKEPHP
    • 35
      Open source
    • 25
      Really rapid framework
    • 19
      Good code organization
    • 13
      Flexibility
    • 10
      Security best practices
    • 7
      Clean architecture
    • 5
      ORM
    • 5
      Less code
    • 4
      Composer friendly
    • 4
      Convention Over Configuration
    • 2
      CakePhp Book
    • 2
      Cake Bake
    • 2
      Built-in Validation
    • 1
      Ctp view File extension
    • 1
      CakePhp inflector
    • 1
      Quickly develop
    • 1
      Rest Full Apis
    CONS OF CAKEPHP
    • 1
      Robust Baking Tool
    • 1
      Follows Good Programming Practices

    related CakePHP posts

    Michael Feldhake
    Developer at Fleet-Nomics · | 7 upvotes · 35.1K views
    Shared insights
    on
    CakePHPCakePHPCodeIgniterCodeIgniterBubbleBubble

    Hi all, I need to create a simple IoT interface application that connects the end device API with a GeoTab API. I am considering using Bubble due to its simple interface and configuration tools, but I fear it's too simple. We will want to add features and new devices as we grow - I was thinking of using CodeIgniter or CakePHP on a hosted site for the application. Must support JCOM encoding between the two APIs and there is no need for a separate interface as GeoTab already has one; we are just connecting and pushing data. Thoughts?

    See more
    Django logo

    Django

    37K
    33.5K
    4.2K
    The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
    37K
    33.5K
    + 1
    4.2K
    PROS OF DJANGO
    • 670
      Rapid development
    • 487
      Open source
    • 424
      Great community
    • 379
      Easy to learn
    • 276
      Mvc
    • 232
      Beautiful code
    • 223
      Elegant
    • 206
      Free
    • 203
      Great packages
    • 194
      Great libraries
    • 79
      Comes with auth and crud admin panel
    • 79
      Restful
    • 78
      Powerful
    • 75
      Great documentation
    • 71
      Great for web
    • 57
      Python
    • 43
      Great orm
    • 41
      Great for api
    • 32
      All included
    • 29
      Fast
    • 25
      Web Apps
    • 23
      Easy setup
    • 23
      Clean
    • 21
      Used by top startups
    • 19
      Sexy
    • 19
      ORM
    • 15
      The Django community
    • 14
      Allows for very rapid development with great libraries
    • 14
      Convention over configuration
    • 11
      King of backend world
    • 10
      Full stack
    • 10
      Great MVC and templating engine
    • 8
      Fast prototyping
    • 8
      Mvt
    • 7
      Easy to develop end to end AI Models
    • 7
      Batteries included
    • 7
      Its elegant and practical
    • 6
      Have not found anything that it can't do
    • 6
      Very quick to get something up and running
    • 6
      Cross-Platform
    • 5
      Easy Structure , useful inbuilt library
    • 5
      Great peformance
    • 5
      Zero code burden to change databases
    • 5
      Python community
    • 4
      Map
    • 4
      Just the right level of abstraction
    • 4
      Easy to change database manager
    • 4
      Modular
    • 4
      Many libraries
    • 4
      Easy to use
    • 4
      Easy
    • 4
      Full-Text Search
    • 3
      Scaffold
    • 1
      Fastapi
    • 1
      Built in common security
    • 1
      Scalable
    • 1
      Great default admin panel
    • 1
      Node js
    • 1
      Gigante ta
    • 0
      Rails
    CONS OF DJANGO
    • 26
      Underpowered templating
    • 22
      Autoreload restarts whole server
    • 22
      Underpowered ORM
    • 15
      URL dispatcher ignores HTTP method
    • 10
      Internal subcomponents coupling
    • 8
      Not nodejs
    • 8
      Configuration hell
    • 7
      Admin
    • 5
      Not as clean and nice documentation like Laravel
    • 4
      Python
    • 3
      Not typed
    • 3
      Bloated admin panel included
    • 2
      Overwhelming folder structure
    • 2
      InEffective Multithreading
    • 1
      Not type safe

    related Django posts

    Dmitry Mukhin
    Engineer at Uploadcare · | 25 upvotes · 2.4M views

    Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

    Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

    For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

    However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

    All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

    See more

    Hey, so I developed a basic application with Python. But to use it, you need a python interpreter. I want to add a GUI to make it more appealing. What should I choose to develop a GUI? I have very basic skills in front end development (CSS, JavaScript). I am fluent in python. I'm looking for a tool that is easy to use and doesn't require too much code knowledge. I have recently tried out Flask, but it is kinda complicated. Should I stick with it, move to Django, or is there another nice framework to use?

    See more
    React logo

    React

    168.9K
    139.6K
    4.1K
    A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
    168.9K
    139.6K
    + 1
    4.1K
    PROS OF REACT
    • 830
      Components
    • 672
      Virtual dom
    • 578
      Performance
    • 507
      Simplicity
    • 442
      Composable
    • 186
      Data flow
    • 166
      Declarative
    • 128
      Isn't an mvc framework
    • 120
      Reactive updates
    • 115
      Explicit app state
    • 50
      JSX
    • 29
      Learn once, write everywhere
    • 22
      Easy to Use
    • 21
      Uni-directional data flow
    • 17
      Works great with Flux Architecture
    • 11
      Great perfomance
    • 10
      Javascript
    • 9
      Built by Facebook
    • 8
      TypeScript support
    • 6
      Speed
    • 6
      Server Side Rendering
    • 5
      Feels like the 90s
    • 5
      Excellent Documentation
    • 5
      Props
    • 5
      Functional
    • 5
      Easy as Lego
    • 5
      Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
    • 5
      Cross-platform
    • 5
      Easy to start
    • 5
      Hooks
    • 5
      Awesome
    • 5
      Scalable
    • 4
      Super easy
    • 4
      Allows creating single page applications
    • 4
      Server side views
    • 4
      Sdfsdfsdf
    • 4
      Start simple
    • 4
      Strong Community
    • 4
      Fancy third party tools
    • 4
      Scales super well
    • 3
      Has arrow functions
    • 3
      Beautiful and Neat Component Management
    • 3
      Just the View of MVC
    • 3
      Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
    • 3
      Fast evolving
    • 3
      SSR
    • 3
      Great migration pathway for older systems
    • 3
      Rich ecosystem
    • 3
      Simple
    • 3
      Has functional components
    • 3
      Every decision architecture wise makes sense
    • 3
      Very gentle learning curve
    • 2
      Split your UI into components with one true state
    • 2
      Recharts
    • 2
      Permissively-licensed
    • 2
      Fragments
    • 2
      Sharable
    • 2
      Image upload
    • 2
      HTML-like
    • 1
      React hooks
    • 1
      Datatables
    CONS OF REACT
    • 40
      Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
    • 29
      No predefined way to structure your app
    • 28
      Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
    • 13
      JSX
    • 10
      Not enterprise friendly
    • 6
      One-way binding only
    • 3
      State consistency with backend neglected
    • 3
      Bad Documentation
    • 2
      Error boundary is needed
    • 2
      Paradigms change too fast

    related React posts

    Johnny Bell

    I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

    I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

    I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

    Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

    Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

    With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

    If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

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    Zach Holman

    Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

    But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

    But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

    Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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