JavaScript

Application and Data / Languages & Frameworks / Languages
Shared insights

All of our Frontend code is written in ECMAScript 6 using React/Redux, running on Node.js JavaScript

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3 upvotes·23.5K views
Senior Software Engineer at Palinode LLC·
Shared insights

As developer at Applied Health Analytics we decided to create a React Native App. In terms of #IDE I'm a good fan of PhpStorm cause we have a lot of PHP in the backend, but I've definitely gave a try to Visual Studio Code and now is my primary JavaScript #IDE. I was impress how fast VS Code has become the No.1 @JavaScript Editor in the community.

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6 upvotes·1 comment·63.3K views
Ravi Kumar
Ravi Kumar
·
February 10th 2021 at 2:21PM

Thanks for sharing this informative content, Great work.

To crack Scrum master interview: https://leanpitch.com/blogs/scrum-master-interview-questions

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Engineering Lead at Katana MRP·
Shared insights
at

We undertook the task of building a manufacturing ERP for small branded manufacturers. We needed to build a lot, fast with a small team, and have clear focus on product delivery. We chose JavaScript / Node.js ( React + LoopBack full stack) , Heroku and Heroku Postgres (also Heroku Redis ) . This decision has guided us to picking other key technologies. It has granted us high pace of product delivery and service availability while operating with a small team.

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Makings of a Katana (katanamrp.com)
8 upvotes·73.3K views
Engineering Lead at Katana MRP·
Shared insights
at
()

Sometimes #ad-blocking addons can cause a real headache when working with JavaScript apps. Onboarding assistants (Appcues + elevio ), chat (Intercom) and product usage insight (Hotjar) have all landed on their blacklists. I guess there is a perfectly good reason for this that I just don't know.

In order to fix this, we had to set up our own content delivery service. We chose Amazon CloudFront and Amazon S3 to do the job because it has a good synergy with Heroku PaaS we are already using.

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7 upvotes·114.4K views
Needs advice
on
TypeScript
and
Flow (JS)

From a StackShare community member: "We are looking to rewrite our outdated front-end with TypeScript. Right now we have a mix of CoffeeScript and vanilla JavaScript. I have read that adopting TypeScript can help enforce better code quality, and best practices. I also heard good things about Flow (JS). Which one would you recommend and why?"

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7 upvotes·86.1K views
Replies (14)
Recommends
TypeScript

I use TypeScript because:

  • incredible developer tooling and community support
  • actively developed and supported by Microsoft (yes, I like Microsoft) ;)
  • easier to make sense of a TS codebase because the annotations provide so much more context than plain JS
  • refactors become easier (VSCode has superb support for TS)

I've switched back and forth between TS and Flow and decided a year ago to abandon Flow completely in favor of TS. I don't want to bash Flow, however, my main grievances are very poor tooling (editor integration leaves much to be desired), a slower release cycle, and subpar docs and community support.

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17 upvotes·42K views
Recommends
TypeScript

I use TypeScript because it isn't just about validating the types I'm expecting to receive though that is a huge part of it too. Flow (JS) seems to be a type system only. TypeScript also allows you to use the latest features of JavaScript while also providing the type checking. To be fair to Flow (JS), I have not used it, but likely wouldn't have due to the additional features I get from TypeScript.

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11 upvotes·68.8K views
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Shared insights
at

I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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19 upvotes·1.2M views
Lead Architect at Fresha·

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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27 upvotes·1 comment·1.1M views
Anand Muley
Anand Muley
·
January 23rd 2020 at 5:23AM

Tech Stacks are going to evolve and be replaced. We will have to keep up with it. Never heard a Developer asking for such a responsibility shift to QA to fix a bug. I have spent some time in an Organization and a Project where test automation responsibility was bestowed upon Developers. It turned out that we did not need any automation QA skilled person we ended up replacing them with Manual QA skilled person. Lets not push our responsibilities to others. There is a reason for keeping a Developer and QA team separate. So that the quality checks are not compromised.

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Needs advice
on
JavaScript
Django
and
Dart

I am currently learning web development with Python and JavaScript course by CS50 Harvard university. It covers python, Flask, Django, SQL, Travis CI, javascript,HTML ,CSS and more. I am very interested in Flutter app development. Can I know what is the difference between learning these above-mentioned frameworks vs learning flutter directly? I am planning to learn flutter so that I can do both web development and app development. Are there any perks of learning these frameworks before flutter?

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7 upvotes·341.8K views
Replies (5)
Recommends
Node.js

Hey Muhamed, For web development, you'll have to learn how to write backend APIs and how to build UI for browsers, apps, etc. If you're just starting off with programming, I'd suggest you stick to one language and trying developing everything using it to cut the unnecessary learning overhead. Although Python and JavaScript are very similar for beginners, JavaScript is the only available option for both frontend and backend development for a web application. You can start working with Node.js for your API development and Vanilla JS along with HTML/CSS for UI. You'll only need to learn one language to do all of this. Hope this helps.

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11 upvotes·1 comment·106K views
Muhamed Suhail
Muhamed Suhail
·
May 2nd 2020 at 4:58PM

Thank You!

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Flutter Developer ·
Recommends
Dart

Flutter is good for everything and it is getting better as I am speaking. Flutter Web is almost ready for production and I have made 2 complex working websites already.

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6 upvotes·1 comment·106K views
Muhamed Suhail
Muhamed Suhail
·
May 4th 2020 at 4:55AM

Thanks Dennis!

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Associate Software Engineer at Intech Process Automation·
Needs advice
on
Spring Boot
and
ASP.NET Core

For context, I currently use JavaScript (React) and Python (Flask) in my daily routine.

I need your help in choosing either Spring Boot or ASP.NET Core. Both frameworks seem to have mature ecosystems. I would like to hear your thoughts on the following points:

  • Difficulty level of both frameworks
  • Level of community support
  • Career prospects i.e do Spring based jobs pay more or vice versa
  • which one will be helpful if I decide to transition towards a more specialized field like data engineering.

I am asking this because it is something that I am also exploring in parallel. I know that Python and #SQL play a huge role in big data.

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5 upvotes·289.9K views
Replies (4)
Software Engineer ·
Recommends
Spring Boot

I'll preface this by saying I haven't ever done work on the Microsoft stack, so take this with a grain of salt.

Community support: Java tends to have a more active community (and much more diverse universe of new open source projects) than .Net (related to below).

Difficulty level: I'd say the Java/Spring stack is more difficult because Java developers tend to use more community projects and have to know which ones to choose in which circumstances (e.g. what logging framework to use? What database connection pooling library to use? What testing framework to use). That being said, most decisions you have to make have choices that are vastly more popular than others. My impression is that .NET guys use stuff from the standard library almost exclusively. If it's not provided there, it's a problem they never thought to solve or maybe write their own (usually the former).

Career prospects: I'll get hate for this probably, but Java/Spring has more jobs than .Net. .NET Core even more so because it's new. Most .NET jobs out there are going to be not Core, and not on anything other than Windows. LinkedIn search for jobs in United States shows 97,103 for Java and 36,448 for C#. That's not to say some individual city might not have more .NET than Java, but by and large Java is bigger. Also, .NET is not dying at the same pace as say Ruby on Rails (sorry Rails fans). I'd say it's ticking very slowly lower, maybe even holding steady. I wouldn't say you're screwed career-wise if you choose .NET. C# is also pretty similar to Java from what I've seen, and I know professionals that have transitioned to Java (though interestingly, I don't know any that did the reverse). Several companies have basically no .NET footprint, for example, Amazon, Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter all have Java, but basically no C#.

Specialized fields: Neither Spring or .Net are going to be a thing in a field like data science. That's exclusively Python (some R) for the most part. The only exception being that there is some Java in Hadoop, and Scala in Spark (which runs on the JVM). But I think those are generally more for data products being created, and not data science work. I'm also under the impression this is increasingly less the case than historically. Some other specialties might make Java useful, for example Android development.

In short, Java is the COBOL of the modern enterprise (which is both a good and bad thing). I recommend it to anyone over .NET, but not for technical reasons. It's for reasons related to the questions you asked. There are actually reasons I think CLR and C# are actually better from a technical perspective than Java (unsurprisingly, since they had the benefit of hindsight). But that's not what you were asking about...

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5 upvotes·4 comments·196.1K views
Taimoor Mirza
Taimoor Mirza
·
July 16th 2020 at 3:39AM

Hearing you say " Java is the COBOL of the modern enterprise" sounds kind of depressing....

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Keegan Witt
Keegan Witt
·
July 16th 2020 at 3:59AM

What I mean by that is that it's ubiquitous and stable. And that I'm maybe a touch cynical after being a Java guy for over a decade.

Innovation has gotten better under Oracle. Sun kinda let the language languish from a lack of new features (e.g. functional programming). But the last several years have picked up and I think has made companies that were looking at Scala or whatever alternative languages decide that the updated Java was good enough and they no longer needed an alternative.

Let's be honest though, all these languages (Python, C#, Java) aren't exciting. They've been around a really long time and are stable workhorses. But that's not a bad thing. A language that has a lot of exciting new features is just gonna break my shit more likely than not.

I'd also add that Python is chipping away at Java's dominance it seems (although it's not happening in the city I live in). So good on you for having that in your toolbelt.

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Taimoor Mirza
Taimoor Mirza
·
July 16th 2020 at 7:30AM

Python for sure has been dominating for the several years. However, I've heard that when it comes to the field of data engineering, Java has more edge. Perhaps a lot of tools like Apache Spark and Kafka are based on it and it also the ability to handle large scale data, but I am not sure about it. Another reason of me asking for Spring/ASP.NET Core is the nature of Java and C#. Knowing a statically typed language (and the relevant frameworks) forces you

to think about your code in more cautious manner. They give a different perspective about writing code. But again, these are just my thoughts.

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Keegan Witt
Keegan Witt
·
July 18th 2020 at 10:31PM

That is true. Java/Scala are pretty big in data intensive applications, though this is a fairly highly specialized area. Since most data science is done in Python, I think fairly often folks just run their stuff in Python and even though it's not all that performant, it's often good enough. Though there's definitely overlap in that problem-space.

It is useful to understand how both dynamic and statically typed languages work. But I wouldn't say a statically typed language makes you have to be more cautious, I'd say it eliminates a category of problems (things not being the type you expect at runtime -- you always know exactly what types you're dealing with). Java is rather verbose in its syntax, but that's not strictly related to it's lack of dynamic types. Scala is much less verbose, but also lacks dynamic types (but it does have type inference, which is one of the things that reduces the amount of ceremony). Static typing also have better tooling (it's easier for an IDE to autocomplete stuff, etc), and better performance (in theory, someone probably could create a dynamically typed language that performs as well as statically typed languages, but it has never happened yet).

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Recommends
Spring Boot

Spring boot helps you creating microservices in hours, not days and there is a very active community around it with amazing integrations. Check one of the tutorials maybe. At least here in Germany, the job market will be better for Spring Boot as well, there are a lot more companies using Java then C#.

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5 upvotes·190.1K views
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Needs advice
on
GitHub
and
CodePen

Brand new (1 week) to coding. Corona killed my industry so I"m making a career change after 25 years. Studying HTML and CSS to become "vertically" proficient, before moving on to JavaScript. So at what point do I need to make a decision on CodePen vs GitHub?

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1 upvote·205.1K views