Atom

Atom

DevOps / Build, Test, Deploy / Text Editor
Graphic Designer & Web Developer at hosting.de GmbH·

I use Visual Studio Code every day, it was very refreshing coming from Atom to get a lightweight, all i need setup right out of the box.

After working with Atom for around 2 years I switch to VSCode.

Here is why:

  1. Color display of variables in code. This may now sound much, but it improve the display of scss variables and its a core feature.
  2. Out of the box features.
  3. Automation! VSCode suggests usefull things to you.
  4. Integraded console. I love the console in VSCode. It is faster than my 'default' cmd on Windows. For Atom you would have to install a package, that doesn't work so well on Windows.
  5. Output logging per Plugin.
  6. Setup time. In VSCode I can set up my workspace in under 5 minutes. For Atom I need
  7. Plugins work perfect out of the box. This is a mayor one for me. For example: In order to set up Editorconfig you have to adjust mutliple values and plugins to get it work. Plugin creators of Editorconfig for Atom are not to blame: They include a linter, that verifies whether the settings are correct or not.
  8. Git implementation. VSCode ships with Git and even if the git packet of vscode doesn't look like much, theres a lot to it. For example you can watch changes inline.
  9. Minimap and vertical scrollbar. This feature is much better implementet in VSCode and you don't need an extra plugin.
  10. Auto completion. Sass mixins example: @include and you press CTRL+SPACE and VSCode shows you every Sass mixin.
  11. Copy paths from open file tab. In VSCode you can copy the path of an file directly when you have it open. In atom you need to select 'show in tree view' and than copy the path or relative path.
  12. Tree view. The tree view VSCode automaticly brings you to the current open file by default. This helps when working with components.
  13. File search. The file search supports the asterisk so you can search for eg molecule-*.ts.
  14. Tasks support. Tasks are integrated in VSCode so eg. for Typescript you can CTRL + SHIFT + B and select tsc: watch - tsconfig.ts.
  15. Short waiting time. For example when deleting files or beautifying 20.000 lines of json (Atom hangs up).
  16. More releases. Faster feature implementation. Active community.
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Atom rant or "X reasons why I moved from Atom to vscode" · GitHub (gist.github.com)
2 upvotes·59.5K views
Needs advice
on
AtomAtomPyCharmPyCharm
and
Sublime TextSublime Text

I am a beginner in Python. I don't have a reliable internet connection and I own a weak hardware in my laptop. I want to go to data security after learning python. Confused between PyCharm, Sublime Text and Atom. I want to stick to one. Which should I make habit of?

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2 upvotes·57.9K views
Replies (1)

Hi, I have used PyCharm, Sublime Text and Atom. PyCharm is very heavy and it contains many extra functions which have not any use for beginner. Atom has slow startup but after that is runs smoothly but not recommended for weak hardware. Atom has great community and bunch plugin support. You can manually install plugins in atom with you need. Sublime Text is really very fast and I think it can smoothly run on weak hardware. I personally using Atom on one computer and VScode on other computer both are great but VScode has better startup time.

At end IDE is not going to make you a pro. When I was beginner I used notepad and then Atom for working fast. I used a simple text editor named MousePad for many months because I got syntax highlighting for mine very weak PC.

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2 upvotes·263 views
Needs advice
on
NeovimNeovim
and
VimVim

For a Visual Studio Code/Atom developer that works mostly with Node.js/TypeScript/Ruby/Go and wants to get rid of graphic-text-editors-IDE-like at once, which one is worthy of investing time to pick up?

I'm a total n00b on the subject, but I've read good things about Neovim's Lua support, and I wonder what would be the VIM response/approach for it?

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8 upvotes·182.5K views
Replies (6)
Recommends
Neovim
Vim

Neovim can basically do everything Vim can with one major advantage - the number of contributors to the code base is just so much wider (Vim is ~100% maintained only by B. Mooleanaar). Whatever you learn for Neovim you can also apply to Vim and vice versa. And of course there is the never ending Vim vs Emacs controversy - but better not get into that war.

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10 upvotes·1 comment·95.1K views
David Milosevic
David Milosevic
·
January 13th 2021 at 7:06AM

For web development definitely NeoVim. It supports more plugins, especially themes. Vim is more for scripting and server related stuff, it is more raw. NeoVim is literally described by it's name..

·
Reply

Actually, the biggest advantage with Neovim (as a VS user) is that you can embed REAL Neovim as the editor UI, rather than using a "Vim emulation", you're using actual NVIM, embedded in VS!

"asvetliakov.vscode-neovim" is the extension you are looking for:

  1. Install the 'vscode-neovim; extension (https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=asvetliakov.vscode-neovim)
  2. Install Neovim version 0.5+ nightly
  3. Start winning.

(You can install neovim-nightly separately for just vscode, I usually build and install it to /opt/nvim - it's enough enough to do - let me know if you need help).

Works wonderfully. It might not work out of the box if you have some 100K epic nvim initialization file, but the plugin documents a workaround for having an embedding/VS specific configuration.

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6 upvotes·93.1K views
View all (6)