Alternatives to OpenAPI logo

Alternatives to OpenAPI

JsonAPI, Postman, GraphQL, OData, and RAML are the most popular alternatives and competitors to OpenAPI.
647
443
+ 1
6

What is OpenAPI and what are its top alternatives?

It is a publicly available application programming interface that provides developers with programmatic access to a proprietary software application or web service.
OpenAPI is a tool in the API Tools category of a tech stack.
OpenAPI is an open source tool with 19.5K GitHub stars and 7K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to OpenAPI's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to OpenAPI

  • JsonAPI
    JsonAPI

    t is a format that works with HTTP. A main goal of the specification is to optimize HTTP requests both in terms of the number of requests and the size of data packages exchanged between clients and servers. ...

  • Postman
    Postman

    It is the only complete API development environment, used by nearly five million developers and more than 100,000 companies worldwide. ...

  • GraphQL
    GraphQL

    GraphQL is a data query language and runtime designed and used at Facebook to request and deliver data to mobile and web apps since 2012. ...

  • OData
    OData

    It is an ISO/IEC approved, OASIS standard that defines a set of best practices for building and consuming RESTful APIs. It helps you focus on your business logic while building RESTful APIs without having to worry about the various approaches to define request and response headers, status codes, HTTP methods, URL conventions, media types, payload formats, query options, etc. ...

  • RAML
    RAML

    RESTful API Modeling Language (RAML) makes it easy to manage the whole API lifecycle from design to sharing. It's concise - you only write what you need to define - and reusable. It is machine readable API design that is actually human friendly. ...

  • gRPC
    gRPC

    gRPC is a modern open source high performance RPC framework that can run in any environment. It can efficiently connect services in and across data centers with pluggable support for load balancing, tracing, health checking... ...

  • REST
    REST

    An architectural style for developing web services. A distributed system framework that uses Web protocols and technologies. ...

  • JavaScript
    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

OpenAPI alternatives & related posts

JsonAPI logo

JsonAPI

94
103
0
A specification for building apis in json
94
103
+ 1
0
PROS OF JSONAPI
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF JSONAPI
      Be the first to leave a con

      related JsonAPI posts

      Postman logo

      Postman

      93.3K
      80K
      1.8K
      Only complete API development environment
      93.3K
      80K
      + 1
      1.8K
      PROS OF POSTMAN
      • 490
        Easy to use
      • 369
        Great tool
      • 276
        Makes developing rest api's easy peasy
      • 156
        Easy setup, looks good
      • 144
        The best api workflow out there
      • 53
        It's the best
      • 53
        History feature
      • 44
        Adds real value to my workflow
      • 43
        Great interface that magically predicts your needs
      • 35
        The best in class app
      • 12
        Can save and share script
      • 10
        Fully featured without looking cluttered
      • 8
        Collections
      • 8
        Option to run scrips
      • 8
        Global/Environment Variables
      • 7
        Shareable Collections
      • 7
        Dead simple and useful. Excellent
      • 7
        Dark theme easy on the eyes
      • 6
        Awesome customer support
      • 6
        Great integration with newman
      • 5
        Documentation
      • 5
        Simple
      • 5
        The test script is useful
      • 4
        Saves responses
      • 4
        This has simplified my testing significantly
      • 4
        Makes testing API's as easy as 1,2,3
      • 4
        Easy as pie
      • 3
        API-network
      • 3
        I'd recommend it to everyone who works with apis
      • 3
        Mocking API calls with predefined response
      • 2
        Now supports GraphQL
      • 2
        Postman Runner CI Integration
      • 2
        Easy to setup, test and provides test storage
      • 2
        Continuous integration using newman
      • 2
        Pre-request Script and Test attributes are invaluable
      • 2
        Runner
      • 2
        Graph
      • 1
        <a href="http://fixbit.com/">useful tool</a>
      CONS OF POSTMAN
      • 10
        Stores credentials in HTTP
      • 9
        Bloated features and UI
      • 8
        Cumbersome to switch authentication tokens
      • 7
        Poor GraphQL support
      • 5
        Expensive
      • 3
        Not free after 5 users
      • 3
        Can't prompt for per-request variables
      • 1
        Import swagger
      • 1
        Support websocket
      • 1
        Import curl

      related Postman posts

      Vaibhav Taunk
      Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 4M views

      I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

      See more
      Noah Zoschke
      Engineering Manager at Segment · | 30 upvotes · 2.9M views

      We just launched the Segment Config API (try it out for yourself here) — a set of public REST APIs that enable you to manage your Segment configuration. A public API is only as good as its #documentation. For the API reference doc we are using Postman.

      Postman is an “API development environment”. You download the desktop app, and build API requests by URL and payload. Over time you can build up a set of requests and organize them into a “Postman Collection”. You can generalize a collection with “collection variables”. This allows you to parameterize things like username, password and workspace_name so a user can fill their own values in before making an API call. This makes it possible to use Postman for one-off API tasks instead of writing code.

      Then you can add Markdown content to the entire collection, a folder of related methods, and/or every API method to explain how the APIs work. You can publish a collection and easily share it with a URL.

      This turns Postman from a personal #API utility to full-blown public interactive API documentation. The result is a great looking web page with all the API calls, docs and sample requests and responses in one place. Check out the results here.

      Postman’s powers don’t end here. You can automate Postman with “test scripts” and have it periodically run a collection scripts as “monitors”. We now have #QA around all the APIs in public docs to make sure they are always correct

      Along the way we tried other techniques for documenting APIs like ReadMe.io or Swagger UI. These required a lot of effort to customize.

      Writing and maintaining a Postman collection takes some work, but the resulting documentation site, interactivity and API testing tools are well worth it.

      See more
      GraphQL logo

      GraphQL

      33.4K
      27.4K
      310
      A data query language and runtime
      33.4K
      27.4K
      + 1
      310
      PROS OF GRAPHQL
      • 75
        Schemas defined by the requests made by the user
      • 63
        Will replace RESTful interfaces
      • 62
        The future of API's
      • 49
        The future of databases
      • 13
        Self-documenting
      • 12
        Get many resources in a single request
      • 6
        Query Language
      • 6
        Ask for what you need, get exactly that
      • 3
        Fetch different resources in one request
      • 3
        Type system
      • 3
        Evolve your API without versions
      • 2
        Ease of client creation
      • 2
        GraphiQL
      • 2
        Easy setup
      • 1
        "Open" document
      • 1
        Fast prototyping
      • 1
        Supports subscription
      • 1
        Standard
      • 1
        Good for apps that query at build time. (SSR/Gatsby)
      • 1
        1. Describe your data
      • 1
        Better versioning
      • 1
        Backed by Facebook
      • 1
        Easy to learn
      CONS OF GRAPHQL
      • 4
        Hard to migrate from GraphQL to another technology
      • 4
        More code to type.
      • 2
        Takes longer to build compared to schemaless.
      • 1
        No support for caching
      • 1
        All the pros sound like NFT pitches
      • 1
        No support for streaming
      • 1
        Works just like any other API at runtime
      • 1
        N+1 fetch problem
      • 1
        No built in security

      related GraphQL posts

      Shared insights
      on
      Node.jsNode.jsGraphQLGraphQLMongoDBMongoDB

      I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

      For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

      1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

      2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

      3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

      See more
      Nick Rockwell
      SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 46 upvotes · 3.6M views

      When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

      So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

      React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

      Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

      See more
      OData logo

      OData

      56
      135
      35
      A REST-based protocol for querying and updating data
      56
      135
      + 1
      35
      PROS OF ODATA
      • 7
        Patterns for paging, sorting, filtering
      • 5
        ISO Standard
      • 4
        Query Language
      • 3
        RESTful
      • 3
        No overfetching, no underfetching
      • 2
        Get many resources in a single request
      • 2
        Self-documenting
      • 2
        Batch requests
      • 2
        Bulk requests ("array upsert")
      • 2
        Ask for what you need, get exactly that
      • 1
        Evolve your API by following the compatibility rules
      • 1
        Resource model defines conventional operations
      • 1
        Resource Modification Language
      CONS OF ODATA
      • 1
        Overwhelming, no "baby steps" documentation

      related OData posts

      RAML logo

      RAML

      127
      155
      39
      RESTful API Modeling Language (RAML) makes it easy to manage the whole API lifecycle from design to sharing
      127
      155
      + 1
      39
      PROS OF RAML
      • 15
        API Specification
      • 7
        Human Readable
      • 6
        API Documentation
      • 3
        Design Patterns & Code Reuse
      • 2
        API Modeling
      • 2
        Automatic Generation of Mule flow
      • 2
        Unit Testing
      • 1
        API Mocking
      • 1
        SDK Generation
      CONS OF RAML
        Be the first to leave a con

        related RAML posts

        gRPC logo

        gRPC

        2.2K
        1.3K
        63
        A high performance, open-source universal RPC framework
        2.2K
        1.3K
        + 1
        63
        PROS OF GRPC
        • 24
          Higth performance
        • 15
          The future of API
        • 13
          Easy setup
        • 5
          Contract-based
        • 4
          Polyglot
        • 2
          Garbage
        CONS OF GRPC
          Be the first to leave a con

          related gRPC posts

          Noah Zoschke
          Engineering Manager at Segment · | 30 upvotes · 275.7K views

          We just launched the Segment Config API (try it out for yourself here) — a set of public REST APIs that enable you to manage your Segment configuration. Behind the scenes the Config API is built with Go , GRPC and Envoy.

          At Segment, we build new services in Go by default. The language is simple so new team members quickly ramp up on a codebase. The tool chain is fast so developers get immediate feedback when they break code, tests or integrations with other systems. The runtime is fast so it performs great at scale.

          For the newest round of APIs we adopted the GRPC service #framework.

          The Protocol Buffer service definition language makes it easy to design type-safe and consistent APIs, thanks to ecosystem tools like the Google API Design Guide for API standards, uber/prototool for formatting and linting .protos and lyft/protoc-gen-validate for defining field validations, and grpc-gateway for defining REST mapping.

          With a well designed .proto, its easy to generate a Go server interface and a TypeScript client, providing type-safe RPC between languages.

          For the API gateway and RPC we adopted the Envoy service proxy.

          The internet-facing segmentapis.com endpoint is an Envoy front proxy that rate-limits and authenticates every request. It then transcodes a #REST / #JSON request to an upstream GRPC request. The upstream GRPC servers are running an Envoy sidecar configured for Datadog stats.

          The result is API #security , #reliability and consistent #observability through Envoy configuration, not code.

          We experimented with Swagger service definitions, but the spec is sprawling and the generated clients and server stubs leave a lot to be desired. GRPC and .proto and the Go implementation feels better designed and implemented. Thanks to the GRPC tooling and ecosystem you can generate Swagger from .protos, but it’s effectively impossible to go the other way.

          See more
          Dylan Krupp
          Shared insights
          on
          gRPCgRPCGraphQLGraphQL

          I used GraphQL extensively at a previous employer a few years ago and really appreciated the data-driven schema etc alongside the many other benefits it provided. At that time, it seemed like it was set to replace RESTful APIs and many companies were adopting it.

          However, as of late, it seems like interest has been waning for GraphQL as opposed to increasing as I had assumed it would. Am I missing something here? What is the current perspective regarding this technology?

          Currently, I'm working with gRPC and was curious as to the state of everything now.

          See more
          REST logo

          REST

          20
          192
          0
          A software architectural style
          20
          192
          + 1
          0
          PROS OF REST
          • 4
            Popularity
          CONS OF REST
            Be the first to leave a con

            related REST posts

            JavaScript logo

            JavaScript

            354.4K
            269.5K
            8.1K
            Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions
            354.4K
            269.5K
            + 1
            8.1K
            PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
            • 1.7K
              Can be used on frontend/backend
            • 1.5K
              It's everywhere
            • 1.2K
              Lots of great frameworks
            • 897
              Fast
            • 745
              Light weight
            • 425
              Flexible
            • 392
              You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
            • 286
              Non-blocking i/o
            • 237
              Ubiquitousness
            • 191
              Expressive
            • 55
              Extended functionality to web pages
            • 49
              Relatively easy language
            • 46
              Executed on the client side
            • 30
              Relatively fast to the end user
            • 25
              Pure Javascript
            • 21
              Functional programming
            • 15
              Async
            • 13
              Full-stack
            • 12
              Setup is easy
            • 12
              Future Language of The Web
            • 12
              Its everywhere
            • 11
              Because I love functions
            • 11
              JavaScript is the New PHP
            • 10
              Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
            • 9
              Expansive community
            • 9
              Everyone use it
            • 9
              Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
            • 9
              Easy
            • 8
              Most Popular Language in the World
            • 8
              Powerful
            • 8
              Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
            • 8
              For the good parts
            • 8
              No need to use PHP
            • 8
              Easy to hire developers
            • 7
              Agile, packages simple to use
            • 7
              Love-hate relationship
            • 7
              Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
            • 7
              Evolution of C
            • 7
              It's fun
            • 7
              Hard not to use
            • 7
              Versitile
            • 7
              Its fun and fast
            • 7
              Nice
            • 7
              Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
            • 7
              Supports lambdas and closures
            • 6
              It let's me use Babel & Typescript
            • 6
              Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
            • 6
              1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
            • 6
              Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
            • 6
              Easy to make something
            • 5
              Clojurescript
            • 5
              Promise relationship
            • 5
              Stockholm Syndrome
            • 5
              Function expressions are useful for callbacks
            • 5
              Scope manipulation
            • 5
              Everywhere
            • 5
              Client processing
            • 5
              What to add
            • 4
              Because it is so simple and lightweight
            • 4
              Only Programming language on browser
            • 1
              Test
            • 1
              Hard to learn
            • 1
              Test2
            • 1
              Not the best
            • 1
              Easy to understand
            • 1
              Subskill #4
            • 1
              Easy to learn
            • 0
              Hard 彤
            CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
            • 22
              A constant moving target, too much churn
            • 20
              Horribly inconsistent
            • 15
              Javascript is the New PHP
            • 9
              No ability to monitor memory utilitization
            • 8
              Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
            • 7
              Thinks strange results are better than errors
            • 6
              Can be ugly
            • 3
              No GitHub
            • 2
              Slow
            • 0
              HORRIBLE DOCUMENTS, faulty code, repo has bugs

            related JavaScript posts

            Zach Holman

            Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

            But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

            But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

            Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

            See more
            Conor Myhrvold
            Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 44 upvotes · 11.2M views

            How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

            Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

            Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

            https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

            (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

            Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

            See more