Alternatives to Java logo

Alternatives to Java

C lang, Abstract, Golang, Python, and Scala are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Java.
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What is Java and what are its top alternatives?

Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Java is a tool in the Languages category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Java

  • C lang
  • Abstract
    Abstract

    Abstract builds upon and extends the stable technology of Git to host and manage your work. ...

  • Golang
    Golang

    Go is expressive, concise, clean, and efficient. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel type system enables flexible and modular program construction. Go compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. It's a fast, statically typed, compiled language that feels like a dynamically typed, interpreted language. ...

  • Python
    Python

    Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best. ...

  • Scala
    Scala

    Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them. ...

  • Kotlin
    Kotlin

    Kotlin is a statically typed programming language for the JVM, Android and the browser, 100% interoperable with Java ...

  • JavaScript
    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

  • Java EE
    Java EE

    It is developed using the Java Community Process, with contributions from industry experts, commercial and open source organizations, Java User Groups, and countless individuals. It offers a rich enterprise software platform and with over 20 compliant implementations to choose from. ...

Java alternatives & related posts

C lang logo

C lang

12.4K
4.2K
247
One of the most widely used programming languages of all time
12.4K
4.2K
+ 1
247
PROS OF C LANG
  • 68
    Performance
  • 49
    Low-level
  • 35
    Portability
  • 28
    Hardware level
  • 19
    Embedded apps
  • 13
    Pure
  • 9
    Performance of assembler
  • 8
    Ubiquity
  • 6
    Great for embedded
  • 4
    Old
  • 3
    Compiles quickly
  • 2
    OpenMP
  • 2
    No garbage collection to slow it down
  • 1
    Gnu/linux interoperable
CONS OF C LANG
  • 5
    Low-level
  • 3
    No built in support for concurrency
  • 2
    Lack of type safety
  • 2
    No built in support for parallelism (e.g. map-reduce)

related C lang posts

Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 17 upvotes · 1.5M views

Why Uber developed H3, our open source grid system to make geospatial data visualization and exploration easier and more efficient:

We decided to create H3 to combine the benefits of a hexagonal global grid system with a hierarchical indexing system. A global grid system usually requires at least two things: a map projection and a grid laid on top of the map. For map projection, we chose to use gnomonic projections centered on icosahedron faces. This projects from Earth as a sphere to an icosahedron, a twenty-sided platonic solid. The H3 grid is constructed by laying out 122 base cells over the Earth, with ten cells per face. H3 supports sixteen resolutions: https://eng.uber.com/h3/

(GitHub Pages : https://uber.github.io/h3/#/ Written in C w/ bindings in Java & JavaScript )

See more

One important decision for delivering a platform independent solution with low memory footprint and minimal dependencies was the choice of the programming language. We considered a few from Python (there was already a reasonably large Python code base at Thumbtack), to Go (we were taking our first steps with it), and even Rust (too immature at the time).

We ended up writing it in C. It was easy to meet all requirements with only one external dependency for implementing the web server, clearly no challenges running it on any of the Linux distributions we were maintaining, and arguably the implementation with the smallest memory footprint given the choices above.

See more
Abstract logo

Abstract

129
86
3
A platform for modern design teams to work together
129
86
+ 1
3
PROS OF ABSTRACT
  • 2
    Great way to maintain historical uxd knowledge
  • 1
    Easy to track down versions
CONS OF ABSTRACT
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Abstract posts

    Golang logo

    Golang

    22.5K
    13.5K
    3.2K
    An open source programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software
    22.5K
    13.5K
    + 1
    3.2K
    PROS OF GOLANG
    • 540
      High-performance
    • 392
      Simple, minimal syntax
    • 360
      Fun to write
    • 299
      Easy concurrency support via goroutines
    • 271
      Fast compilation times
    • 193
      Goroutines
    • 179
      Statically linked binaries that are simple to deploy
    • 150
      Simple compile build/run procedures
    • 136
      Backed by google
    • 134
      Great community
    • 52
      Garbage collection built-in
    • 45
      Built-in Testing
    • 43
      Excellent tools - gofmt, godoc etc
    • 39
      Elegant and concise like Python, fast like C
    • 37
      Awesome to Develop
    • 26
      Used for Docker
    • 25
      Flexible interface system
    • 24
      Deploy as executable
    • 24
      Great concurrency pattern
    • 20
      Open-source Integration
    • 17
      Easy to read
    • 17
      Fun to write and so many feature out of the box
    • 16
      Go is God
    • 14
      Its Simple and Heavy duty
    • 14
      Powerful and simple
    • 14
      Easy to deploy
    • 13
      Best language for concurrency
    • 12
      Concurrency
    • 11
      Rich standard library
    • 11
      Safe GOTOs
    • 10
      Clean code, high performance
    • 10
      Easy setup
    • 9
      Simplicity, Concurrency, Performance
    • 9
      High performance
    • 8
      Hassle free deployment
    • 8
      Single binary avoids library dependency issues
    • 7
      Simple, powerful, and great performance
    • 7
      Cross compiling
    • 7
      Used by Giants of the industry
    • 6
      Gofmt
    • 6
      Garbage Collection
    • 5
      Very sophisticated syntax
    • 5
      Excellent tooling
    • 5
      WYSIWYG
    • 4
      Kubernetes written on Go
    • 4
      Widely used
    • 4
      Keep it simple and stupid
    • 2
      No generics
    • 1
      Looks not fancy, but promoting pragmatic idioms
    • 1
      Operator goto
    CONS OF GOLANG
    • 42
      You waste time in plumbing code catching errors
    • 25
      Verbose
    • 23
      Packages and their path dependencies are braindead
    • 16
      Google's documentations aren't beginer friendly
    • 15
      Dependency management when working on multiple projects
    • 10
      Automatic garbage collection overheads
    • 8
      Uncommon syntax
    • 7
      Type system is lacking (no generics, etc)
    • 5
      Collection framework is lacking (list, set, map)
    • 2
      Best programming language

    related Golang posts

    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 43 upvotes · 7.4M views

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

    See more
    Nick Parsons
    Building cool things on the internet 🛠️ at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 2.4M views

    Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

    We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

    We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

    Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

    #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

    See more
    Python logo

    Python

    235.9K
    185.7K
    6.8K
    A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java.
    235.9K
    185.7K
    + 1
    6.8K
    PROS OF PYTHON
    • 1.2K
      Great libraries
    • 956
      Readable code
    • 840
      Beautiful code
    • 783
      Rapid development
    • 687
      Large community
    • 431
      Open source
    • 389
      Elegant
    • 280
      Great community
    • 272
      Object oriented
    • 216
      Dynamic typing
    • 77
      Great standard library
    • 58
      Very fast
    • 53
      Functional programming
    • 46
      Easy to learn
    • 45
      Scientific computing
    • 35
      Great documentation
    • 28
      Matlab alternative
    • 27
      Productivity
    • 27
      Easy to read
    • 23
      Simple is better than complex
    • 20
      It's the way I think
    • 19
      Imperative
    • 18
      Free
    • 17
      Very programmer and non-programmer friendly
    • 16
      Powerfull language
    • 16
      Machine learning support
    • 15
      Fast and simple
    • 14
      Scripting
    • 12
      Explicit is better than implicit
    • 10
      Ease of development
    • 9
      Unlimited power
    • 9
      Clear and easy and powerfull
    • 8
      Import antigravity
    • 7
      Print "life is short, use python"
    • 7
      It's lean and fun to code
    • 6
      Now is better than never
    • 6
      Fast coding and good for competitions
    • 6
      There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious
    • 6
      High Documented language
    • 6
      I love snakes
    • 6
      Although practicality beats purity
    • 6
      Python has great libraries for data processing
    • 6
      Flat is better than nested
    • 6
      Great for tooling
    • 5
      Rapid Prototyping
    • 5
      Readability counts
    • 4
      Lists, tuples, dictionaries
    • 4
      Web scraping
    • 4
      CG industry needs
    • 4
      Great for analytics
    • 4
      Socially engaged community
    • 4
      Complex is better than complicated
    • 4
      Multiple Inheritence
    • 4
      Beautiful is better than ugly
    • 4
      Plotting
    • 3
      Simple and easy to learn
    • 3
      Import this
    • 3
      Many types of collections
    • 3
      If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a g
    • 3
      Easy to setup and run smooth
    • 3
      Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules
    • 3
      Pip install everything
    • 3
      List comprehensions
    • 3
      No cruft
    • 3
      Easy to learn and use
    • 3
      Generators
    • 3
      If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad id
    • 2
      Should START with this but not STICK with This
    • 2
      A-to-Z
    • 2
      Because of Netflix
    • 2
      Only one way to do it
    • 2
      Better outcome
    • 2
      Good for hacking
    • 2
      Flexible and easy
    • 2
      It is Very easy , simple and will you be love programmi
    • 2
      Batteries included
    • 2
      Can understand easily who are new to programming
    • 2
      Powerful language for AI
    • 1
      Securit
    • 0
      Powerful
    CONS OF PYTHON
    • 52
      Still divided between python 2 and python 3
    • 28
      Performance impact
    • 26
      Poor syntax for anonymous functions
    • 22
      GIL
    • 19
      Package management is a mess
    • 14
      Too imperative-oriented
    • 12
      Hard to understand
    • 12
      Dynamic typing
    • 12
      Very slow
    • 8
      Not everything is expression
    • 7
      Incredibly slow
    • 7
      Explicit self parameter in methods
    • 7
      Indentations matter a lot
    • 6
      Requires C functions for dynamic modules
    • 6
      No anonymous functions
    • 6
      Poor DSL capabilities
    • 5
      Fake object-oriented programming
    • 5
      Threading
    • 5
      The "lisp style" whitespaces
    • 5
      Official documentation is unclear.
    • 5
      Hard to obfuscate
    • 4
      Lack of Syntax Sugar leads to "the pyramid of doom"
    • 4
      Circular import
    • 4
      The benevolent-dictator-for-life quit
    • 4
      Not suitable for autocomplete
    • 2
      Meta classes
    • 1
      Training wheels (forced indentation)

    related Python posts

    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 43 upvotes · 7.4M views

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

    See more
    Nick Parsons
    Building cool things on the internet 🛠️ at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 2.4M views

    Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

    We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

    We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

    Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

    #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

    See more
    Scala logo

    Scala

    11.2K
    7.5K
    1.5K
    A pure-bred object-oriented language that runs on the JVM
    11.2K
    7.5K
    + 1
    1.5K
    PROS OF SCALA
    • 187
      Static typing
    • 178
      Pattern-matching
    • 177
      Jvm
    • 172
      Scala is fun
    • 138
      Types
    • 95
      Concurrency
    • 88
      Actor library
    • 86
      Solve functional problems
    • 81
      Open source
    • 80
      Solve concurrency in a safer way
    • 44
      Functional
    • 24
      Fast
    • 23
      Generics
    • 18
      It makes me a better engineer
    • 17
      Syntactic sugar
    • 13
      Scalable
    • 10
      First-class functions
    • 10
      Type safety
    • 9
      Interactive REPL
    • 8
      Expressive
    • 7
      SBT
    • 6
      Case classes
    • 6
      Implicit parameters
    • 4
      Rapid and Safe Development using Functional Programming
    • 4
      JVM, OOP and Functional programming, and static typing
    • 4
      Object-oriented
    • 4
      Used by Twitter
    • 3
      Functional Proframming
    • 2
      Spark
    • 2
      Beautiful Code
    • 2
      Safety
    • 2
      Growing Community
    • 1
      DSL
    • 1
      Rich Static Types System and great Concurrency support
    • 1
      Naturally enforce high code quality
    • 1
      Akka Streams
    • 1
      Akka
    • 1
      Reactive Streams
    • 1
      Easy embedded DSLs
    • 1
      Mill build tool
    • 0
      Freedom to choose the right tools for a job
    CONS OF SCALA
    • 11
      Slow compilation time
    • 7
      Multiple ropes and styles to hang your self
    • 6
      Too few developers available
    • 4
      Complicated subtyping
    • 2
      My coworkers using scala are racist against other stuff

    related Scala posts

    Shared insights
    on
    JavaJavaScalaScalaApache SparkApache Spark

    I am new to Apache Spark and Scala both. I am basically a Java developer and have around 10 years of experience in Java.

    I wish to work on some Machine learning or AI tech stacks. Please assist me in the tech stack and help make a clear Road Map. Any feedback is welcome.

    Technologies apart from Scala and Spark are also welcome. Please note that the tools should be relevant to Machine Learning or Artificial Intelligence.

    See more
    Marc Bollinger
    Infra & Data Eng Manager at Thumbtack · | 5 upvotes · 1.6M views

    Lumosity is home to the world's largest cognitive training database, a responsibility we take seriously. For most of the company's history, our analysis of user behavior and training data has been powered by an event stream--first a simple Node.js pub/sub app, then a heavyweight Ruby app with stronger durability. Both supported decent throughput and latency, but they lacked some major features supported by existing open-source alternatives: replaying existing messages (also lacking in most message queue-based solutions), scaling out many different readers for the same stream, the ability to leverage existing solutions for reading and writing, and possibly most importantly: the ability to hire someone externally who already had expertise.

    We ultimately migrated to Kafka in early- to mid-2016, citing both industry trends in companies we'd talked to with similar durability and throughput needs, the extremely strong documentation and community. We pored over Kyle Kingsbury's Jepsen post (https://aphyr.com/posts/293-jepsen-Kafka), as well as Jay Kreps' follow-up (http://blog.empathybox.com/post/62279088548/a-few-notes-on-kafka-and-jepsen), talked at length with Confluent folks and community members, and still wound up running parallel systems for quite a long time, but ultimately, we've been very, very happy. Understanding the internals and proper levers takes some commitment, but it's taken very little maintenance once configured. Since then, the Confluent Platform community has grown and grown; we've gone from doing most development using custom Scala consumers and producers to being 60/40 Kafka Streams/Connects.

    We originally looked into Storm / Heron , and we'd moved on from Redis pub/sub. Heron looks great, but we already had a programming model across services that was more akin to consuming a message consumers than required a topology of bolts, etc. Heron also had just come out while we were starting to migrate things, and the community momentum and direction of Kafka felt more substantial than the older Storm. If we were to start the process over again today, we might check out Pulsar , although the ecosystem is much younger.

    To find out more, read our 2017 engineering blog post about the migration!

    See more
    Kotlin logo

    Kotlin

    15.8K
    10.9K
    647
    Statically typed Programming Language targeting JVM and JavaScript
    15.8K
    10.9K
    + 1
    647
    PROS OF KOTLIN
    • 73
      Interoperable with Java
    • 55
      Functional Programming support
    • 50
      Null Safety
    • 46
      Official Android support
    • 44
      Backed by JetBrains
    • 37
      Concise
    • 36
      Modern Multiplatform Applications
    • 28
      Expressive Syntax
    • 27
      Target to JVM
    • 26
      Coroutines
    • 24
      Open Source
    • 19
      Practical elegance
    • 19
      Statically Typed
    • 17
      Type Inference
    • 17
      Android support
    • 14
      Readable code
    • 13
      Powerful as Scala, simple as Python, plus coroutines <3
    • 12
      Better Java
    • 10
      Pragmatic
    • 9
      Lambda
    • 8
      Target to JavaScript
    • 8
      Better language for android
    • 8
      Expressive DSLs
    • 6
      Used for Android
    • 6
      Less boilerplate code
    • 5
      Fast Programming language
    • 5
      Less code
    • 4
      Less boiler plate code
    • 4
      Functional Programming Language
    • 4
      Native
    • 4
      Friendly community
    • 3
      Spring
    • 3
      Official Google Support
    • 2
      Latest version of Java
    • 1
      Well-compromised featured Java alternative
    CONS OF KOTLIN
    • 7
      Java interop makes users write Java in Kotlin
    • 4
      Frequent use of {} keys
    • 2
      Hard to make teams adopt the Kotlin style
    • 2
      Nonullpointer Exception
    • 1
      Friendly community
    • 1
      Slow compiler
    • 1
      No boiler plate code

    related Kotlin posts

    Shivam Bhargava
    AVP - Business at VAYUZ Technologies Pvt. Ltd. · | 22 upvotes · 601.1K views

    Hi Community! Trust everyone is keeping safe. I am exploring the idea of building a #Neobank (App) with end-to-end banking capabilities. In the process of exploring this space, I have come across multiple Apps (N26, Revolut, Monese, etc) and explored their stacks in detail. The confusion remains to be the Backend Tech to be used?

    What would you go with considering all of the languages such as Node.js Java Rails Python are suggested by some person or the other. As a general trend, I have noticed the usage of Node with React on the front or Node with a combination of Kotlin and Swift. Please suggest what would be the right approach!

    See more
    Jakub Olan
    Node.js Software Engineer · | 17 upvotes · 514.6K views

    In our company we have think a lot about languages that we're willing to use, there we have considering Java, Python and C++ . All of there languages are old and well developed at fact but that's not ideology of araclx. We've choose a edge technologies such as Node.js , Rust , Kotlin and Go as our programming languages which is some kind of fun. Node.js is one of biggest trends of 2019, same for Go. We want to grow in our company with growth of languages we have choose, and probably when we would choose Java that would be almost impossible because larger languages move on today's market slower, and cannot have big changes.

    See more
    JavaScript logo

    JavaScript

    346.2K
    253.9K
    8K
    Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions
    346.2K
    253.9K
    + 1
    8K
    PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
    • 1.7K
      Can be used on frontend/backend
    • 1.5K
      It's everywhere
    • 1.2K
      Lots of great frameworks
    • 896
      Fast
    • 745
      Light weight
    • 425
      Flexible
    • 392
      You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
    • 286
      Non-blocking i/o
    • 236
      Ubiquitousness
    • 191
      Expressive
    • 55
      Extended functionality to web pages
    • 49
      Relatively easy language
    • 46
      Executed on the client side
    • 30
      Relatively fast to the end user
    • 25
      Pure Javascript
    • 21
      Functional programming
    • 15
      Async
    • 13
      Full-stack
    • 12
      Its everywhere
    • 12
      Setup is easy
    • 11
      Because I love functions
    • 11
      JavaScript is the New PHP
    • 10
      Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
    • 9
      Easy
    • 9
      Future Language of The Web
    • 9
      Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
    • 9
      Expansive community
    • 8
      Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
    • 8
      No need to use PHP
    • 8
      For the good parts
    • 8
      Most Popular Language in the World
    • 8
      Everyone use it
    • 8
      Easy to hire developers
    • 7
      Agile, packages simple to use
    • 7
      Love-hate relationship
    • 7
      Powerful
    • 7
      Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
    • 7
      Evolution of C
    • 7
      Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
    • 7
      Supports lambdas and closures
    • 6
      It let's me use Babel & Typescript
    • 6
      1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
    • 6
      It's fun
    • 6
      Nice
    • 6
      Hard not to use
    • 6
      Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
    • 6
      Versitile
    • 6
      Easy to make something
    • 6
      Its fun and fast
    • 6
      Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
    • 5
      What to add
    • 5
      Clojurescript
    • 5
      Promise relationship
    • 5
      Stockholm Syndrome
    • 5
      Function expressions are useful for callbacks
    • 5
      Scope manipulation
    • 5
      Everywhere
    • 5
      Client processing
    • 4
      Only Programming language on browser
    • 4
      Because it is so simple and lightweight
    • 1
      Subskill #4
    • 1
      Easy to understand
    • 1
      Not the best
    • 1
      Hard to learn
    • 1
      Easy to learn
    • 1
      Test
    • 1
      Test2
    • 0
      Hard 彤
    CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
    • 22
      A constant moving target, too much churn
    • 20
      Horribly inconsistent
    • 15
      Javascript is the New PHP
    • 9
      No ability to monitor memory utilitization
    • 8
      Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
    • 7
      Thinks strange results are better than errors
    • 6
      Can be ugly
    • 3
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    Zach Holman

    Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

    But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

    But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

    Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 43 upvotes · 7.4M views

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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    Shared insights
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    JavaScriptJavaScriptJava EEJava EE

    Hi, I'm looking to learn Java EE and JavaScript.... but confused about exactly the difference between J2EE and JavaScript.....are both interconnected or different??? And if I want to learn both, should I learn JavaScript first and then touch J2EE or learn J2EE first and then JavaScript??.... please suggest

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    Brett Bonner
    Chief Product Officer at InfoDesk · | 5 upvotes · 50.6K views

    In which situations should we use Cypress or Robot Framework? Are both good choices to get tenured manual testers into the practice of automating their work for tests of APIs and functional tests of web applications? Cypress looks great for functional testing of web applications and Robot Framework looks great for everything else.

    Background: We have over a thousand functional test cases for our web applications being executed manually by a QA team. Our front ends interface with APIs written in Java with various frameworks over the years (e.g. Spring, Spring Boot, Java EE). I think our testers could learn enough of the basic coding in JS, Java, and Python required to automate most of those cases.

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