Alternatives to GitHub Pages logo

Alternatives to GitHub Pages

Netlify, GitLab Pages, Amazon S3, Medium, and WordPress are the most popular alternatives and competitors to GitHub Pages.
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What is GitHub Pages and what are its top alternatives?

Public webpages hosted directly from your GitHub repository. Just edit, push, and your changes are live.
GitHub Pages is a tool in the Static Web Hosting category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to GitHub Pages

  • Netlify

    Netlify

    Netlify is smart enough to process your site and make sure all assets gets optimized and served with perfect caching-headers from a cookie-less domain. We make sure your HTML is served straight from our CDN edge nodes without any round-trip to our backend servers and are the only ones to give you instant cache invalidation when you push a new deploy. Netlify is also the only static hosting service with integrated continuous deployment. ...

  • GitLab Pages

    GitLab Pages

    Host your static websites on GitLab.com for free, or on your own GitLab Enterprise Edition instance. Use any static website generator: Jekyll, Middleman, Hexo, Hugo, Pelican, and more ...

  • Amazon S3

    Amazon S3

    Amazon Simple Storage Service provides a fully redundant data storage infrastructure for storing and retrieving any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web ...

  • Medium

    Medium

    Medium is a different kind of place on the internet. A place where the measure of success isn’t views, but viewpoints. Where the quality of the idea matters, not the author’s qualifications. A place where conversation pushes ideas forward. ...

  • WordPress

    WordPress

    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family. ...

  • Heroku

    Heroku

    Heroku is a cloud application platform – a new way of building and deploying web apps. Heroku lets app developers spend 100% of their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling. ...

  • Firebase

    Firebase

    Firebase is a cloud service designed to power real-time, collaborative applications. Simply add the Firebase library to your application to gain access to a shared data structure; any changes you make to that data are automatically synchronized with the Firebase cloud and with other clients within milliseconds. ...

  • Firebase Hosting

    Firebase Hosting

    It is production-grade web content hosting for developers. With a single command, you can quickly deploy web apps and serve both static and dynamic content to a global CDN (content delivery network). You can also pair it with Cloud Functions or Cloud Run to build and host microservices. ...

GitHub Pages alternatives & related posts

Netlify logo

Netlify

2.2K
1.7K
195
Build, deploy and host your static site or app with a drag and drop interface and automatic delpoys...
2.2K
1.7K
+ 1
195
PROS OF NETLIFY
  • 43
    Easy deploy
  • 41
    Fastest static hosting and continuous deployments
  • 21
    Free SSL support
  • 21
    Super simple deploys
  • 15
    Easy Setup and Continous deployments
  • 9
    Free plan for personal websites
  • 9
    Faster than any other option in the market
  • 7
    Deploy previews
  • 6
    Free Open Source (Pro) plan
  • 4
    Easy to use and great support
  • 4
    Analytics
  • 4
    Great loop-in material on a blog
  • 3
    Great drag and drop functionality
  • 3
    Fastest static hosting and continuous deployments
  • 2
    Custom domains support
  • 1
    Canary Releases (Split Tests)
  • 1
    Tech oriented support
  • 1
    Supports static site generators
CONS OF NETLIFY
  • 8
    It's expensive
  • 1
    Bandwidth limitation

related Netlify posts

Johnny Bell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 77 upvotes · 1.2M views

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

See more
Stephen Gheysens
Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 282.5K views

Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

See more
GitLab Pages logo

GitLab Pages

218
256
10
Create websites for your GitLab projects, groups, or user account
218
256
+ 1
10
PROS OF GITLAB PAGES
  • 4
    Free
  • 4
    Integrated build and release pipeline
  • 2
    Allows any custom build scripts and plugins
CONS OF GITLAB PAGES
  • 1
    Require Jekyll approach
  • 0
    Slow builds

related GitLab Pages posts

Joshua Dean Küpper
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 18 upvotes · 267.4K views

We use GitLab CI because of the great native integration as a part of the GitLab framework and the linting-capabilities it offers. The visualization of complex pipelines and the embedding within the project overview made Gitlab CI even more convenient. We use it for all projects, all deployments and as a part of GitLab Pages.

While we initially used the Shell-executor, we quickly switched to the Docker-executor and use it exclusively now.

We formerly used Jenkins but preferred to handle everything within GitLab . Aside from the unification of our infrastructure another motivation was the "configuration-in-file"-approach, that Gitlab CI offered, while Jenkins support of this concept was very limited and users had to resort to using the webinterface. Since the file is included within the repository, it is also version controlled, which was a huge plus for us.

See more
Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 614K views

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

See more
Amazon S3 logo

Amazon S3

39.7K
28.1K
2K
Store and retrieve any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web
39.7K
28.1K
+ 1
2K
PROS OF AMAZON S3
  • 589
    Reliable
  • 491
    Scalable
  • 456
    Cheap
  • 328
    Simple & easy
  • 83
    Many sdks
  • 29
    Logical
  • 12
    Easy Setup
  • 11
    1000+ POPs
  • 9
    REST API
  • 5
    Secure
  • 3
    Easy
  • 2
    Web UI for uploading files
  • 2
    Plug and play
  • 1
    GDPR ready
  • 1
    Flexible
  • 1
    Faster on response
  • 1
    Plug-gable
  • 1
    Easy to use
  • 1
    Easy integration with CloudFront
CONS OF AMAZON S3
  • 7
    Permissions take some time to get right
  • 6
    Takes time/work to organize buckets & folders properly
  • 5
    Requires a credit card
  • 3
    Complex to set up

related Amazon S3 posts

Ashish Singh
Tech Lead, Big Data Platform at Pinterest · | 36 upvotes · 838.4K views

To provide employees with the critical need of interactive querying, we’ve worked with Presto, an open-source distributed SQL query engine, over the years. Operating Presto at Pinterest’s scale has involved resolving quite a few challenges like, supporting deeply nested and huge thrift schemas, slow/ bad worker detection and remediation, auto-scaling cluster, graceful cluster shutdown and impersonation support for ldap authenticator.

Our infrastructure is built on top of Amazon EC2 and we leverage Amazon S3 for storing our data. This separates compute and storage layers, and allows multiple compute clusters to share the S3 data.

We have hundreds of petabytes of data and tens of thousands of Apache Hive tables. Our Presto clusters are comprised of a fleet of 450 r4.8xl EC2 instances. Presto clusters together have over 100 TBs of memory and 14K vcpu cores. Within Pinterest, we have close to more than 1,000 monthly active users (out of total 1,600+ Pinterest employees) using Presto, who run about 400K queries on these clusters per month.

Each query submitted to Presto cluster is logged to a Kafka topic via Singer. Singer is a logging agent built at Pinterest and we talked about it in a previous post. Each query is logged when it is submitted and when it finishes. When a Presto cluster crashes, we will have query submitted events without corresponding query finished events. These events enable us to capture the effect of cluster crashes over time.

Each Presto cluster at Pinterest has workers on a mix of dedicated AWS EC2 instances and Kubernetes pods. Kubernetes platform provides us with the capability to add and remove workers from a Presto cluster very quickly. The best-case latency on bringing up a new worker on Kubernetes is less than a minute. However, when the Kubernetes cluster itself is out of resources and needs to scale up, it can take up to ten minutes. Some other advantages of deploying on Kubernetes platform is that our Presto deployment becomes agnostic of cloud vendor, instance types, OS, etc.

#BigData #AWS #DataScience #DataEngineering

See more
Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.1M views

Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
  • Respectively Git as revision control system
  • SourceTree as Git GUI
  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
  • SonarQube as quality gate
  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
See more
Medium logo

Medium

729
645
184
The perfect place to read and write.
729
645
+ 1
184
PROS OF MEDIUM
  • 60
    Beautiful UI
  • 33
    Typography
  • 15
    Network effect
  • 12
    Embedding videos, tweets, vines
  • 11
    Great mobile app
  • 10
    Notes
  • 10
    Simple, yet elegant and appealing UX
  • 9
    Word counter
  • 7
    Easy to gain traction
  • 5
    Idealized media consumption
  • 2
    Version history
  • 2
    Embed medium
  • 2
    Inline Comments & Discussions
  • 2
    Beautiful design. great content, excellent experience
  • 2
    Recommendations
  • 1
    Daily Digest
  • 1
    Nice UI and UX
CONS OF MEDIUM
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Medium posts

    WordPress logo

    WordPress

    81.1K
    26.2K
    2K
    A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability.
    81.1K
    26.2K
    + 1
    2K
    PROS OF WORDPRESS
    • 409
      Customizable
    • 360
      Easy to manage
    • 349
      Plugins & themes
    • 258
      Non-tech colleagues can update website content
    • 245
      Really powerful
    • 143
      Rapid website development
    • 76
      Best documentation
    • 50
      Codex
    • 43
      Product feature set
    • 34
      Custom/internal social network
    • 13
      Open source
    • 7
      Great for all types of websites
    • 5
      Huge install and user base
    • 4
      Best
    • 4
      I like it like I like a kick in the groin
    • 4
      Most websites make use of it
    • 4
      Open Source Community
    • 4
      Perfect example of user collaboration
    • 4
      It's simple and easy to use by any novice
    • 3
      Community
    • 3
      API-based CMS
    • 2
      Easy To use
    • 1
      <a href="https://secure.wphackedhel">Easy Beginner</a>
    CONS OF WORDPRESS
    • 11
      Hard to keep up-to-date if you customize things
    • 10
      Plugins are of mixed quality
    • 8
      Not best backend UI
    • 1
      Complex Organization
    • 1
      Great Security

    related WordPress posts

    Dale Ross
    Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 957.2K views

    I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

    I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

    Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

    See more
    Siddhant Sharma
    Tech Connoisseur at Channelize.io · | 12 upvotes · 769.8K views

    WordPress Magento PHP Java Swift JavaScript

    Back in the days, we started looking for a date on different matrimonial websites as there were no Dating Applications. We used to create different profiles. It all changed in 2012 when Tinder, an Online Dating application came into India Market.

    Tinder allowed us to communicate with our potential soul mates. That too without paying any extra money. I too got 4-6 matches in 6 years. It changed the life of many Millennials. Tinder created a revolution of its own. P.S. - I still don't have a date :(

    Posting my first article. Please have a look and do give feedback.

    Communication InAppChat Dating Matrimonial #messaging

    See more
    Heroku logo

    Heroku

    19.4K
    15.1K
    3.2K
    Build, deliver, monitor and scale web apps and APIs with a trail blazing developer experience.
    19.4K
    15.1K
    + 1
    3.2K
    PROS OF HEROKU
    • 704
      Easy deployment
    • 460
      Free for side projects
    • 374
      Huge time-saver
    • 348
      Simple scaling
    • 261
      Low devops skills required
    • 190
      Easy setup
    • 174
      Add-ons for almost everything
    • 154
      Beginner friendly
    • 150
      Better for startups
    • 133
      Low learning curve
    • 48
      Postgres hosting
    • 41
      Easy to add collaborators
    • 30
      Faster development
    • 24
      Awesome documentation
    • 19
      Simple rollback
    • 19
      Focus on product, not deployment
    • 15
      Natural companion for rails development
    • 15
      Easy integration
    • 12
      Great customer support
    • 8
      GitHub integration
    • 6
      No-ops
    • 6
      Painless & well documented
    • 4
      I love that they make it free to launch a side project
    • 4
      Free
    • 3
      Great UI
    • 3
      Just works
    • 2
      PostgreSQL forking and following
    • 2
      MySQL extension
    • 0
      Security
    • 0
      Sec
    CONS OF HEROKU
    • 23
      Super expensive
    • 6
      Not a whole lot of flexibility
    • 5
      No usable MySQL option
    • 5
      Storage
    • 4
      Low performance on free tier
    • 1
      24/7 support is $1,000 per month

    related Heroku posts

    Russel Werner
    Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 29 upvotes · 1.4M views

    StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

    Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

    #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

    See more
    Simon Reymann
    Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.1M views

    Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

    • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
    • Respectively Git as revision control system
    • SourceTree as Git GUI
    • Visual Studio Code as IDE
    • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
    • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
    • SonarQube as quality gate
    • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
    • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
    • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
    • Heroku for deploying in test environments
    • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
    • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
    • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
    • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
    • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

    The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

    • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
    • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
    • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
    • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
    • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
    • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
    See more
    Firebase logo

    Firebase

    27K
    22.7K
    1.9K
    The Realtime App Platform
    27K
    22.7K
    + 1
    1.9K
    PROS OF FIREBASE
    • 361
      Realtime backend made easy
    • 264
      Fast and responsive
    • 234
      Easy setup
    • 207
      Real-time
    • 186
      JSON
    • 127
      Free
    • 121
      Backed by google
    • 81
      Angular adaptor
    • 63
      Reliable
    • 36
      Great customer support
    • 26
      Great documentation
    • 23
      Real-time synchronization
    • 20
      Mobile friendly
    • 17
      Rapid prototyping
    • 12
      Great security
    • 11
      Automatic scaling
    • 10
      Freakingly awesome
    • 8
      Chat
    • 8
      Angularfire is an amazing addition!
    • 8
      Super fast development
    • 6
      Awesome next-gen backend
    • 6
      Ios adaptor
    • 5
      Built in user auth/oauth
    • 5
      Firebase hosting
    • 4
      Speed of light
    • 4
      Very easy to use
    • 3
      It's made development super fast
    • 3
      Great
    • 3
      Brilliant for startups
    • 2
      Great all-round functionality
    • 2
      Low battery consumption
    • 2
      I can quickly create static web apps with no backend
    • 2
      The concurrent updates create a great experience
    • 2
      JS Offline and Sync suport
    • 1
      Faster workflow
    • 1
      Large
    • 1
      Serverless
    • 1
      .net
    • 1
      Free SSL
    • 1
      Good Free Limits
    • 1
      Push notification
    • 1
      Easy to use
    • 1
      Easy Reactjs integration
    CONS OF FIREBASE
    • 28
      Can become expensive
    • 15
      Scalability is not infinite
    • 14
      No open source, you depend on external company
    • 9
      Not Flexible Enough
    • 5
      Cant filter queries
    • 3
      Very unstable server
    • 2
      Too many errors
    • 2
      No Relational Data

    related Firebase posts

    Stephen Gheysens
    Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 282.5K views

    Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

    My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

    See more
    Tassanai Singprom

    This is my stack in Application & Data

    JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

    My Utilities Tools

    Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

    My Devops Tools

    Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

    My Business Tools

    Slack

    See more
    Firebase Hosting logo

    Firebase Hosting

    142
    135
    7
    Production-grade web content hosting
    142
    135
    + 1
    7
    PROS OF FIREBASE HOSTING
    • 4
      Integration with firebase
    • 1
      Analytics
    • 1
      Super simple deploys
    • 1
      Easy deployment
    CONS OF FIREBASE HOSTING
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Firebase Hosting posts