Alternatives to DeployBot logo

Alternatives to DeployBot

Beanstalk, DeployHQ, Jenkins, Buddy, and AWS CodePipeline are the most popular alternatives and competitors to DeployBot.
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What is DeployBot and what are its top alternatives?

DeployBot makes it simple to deploy your work anywhere. You can compile or process your code in a Docker container on our infrastructure, and we'll copy it to your servers once everything has been successfully built.
DeployBot is a tool in the Continuous Deployment category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to DeployBot

  • Beanstalk

    Beanstalk

    A single process to commit code, review with the team, and deploy the final result to your customers. ...

  • DeployHQ

    DeployHQ

    A service packed with features to help you automate and manage the continuous deployment of your websites. ...

  • Jenkins

    Jenkins

    In a nutshell Jenkins CI is the leading open-source continuous integration server. Built with Java, it provides over 300 plugins to support building and testing virtually any project. ...

  • Buddy

    Buddy

    Git platform for web and software developers with Docker-based tools for Continuous Integration and Deployment. ...

  • AWS CodePipeline

    AWS CodePipeline

    CodePipeline builds, tests, and deploys your code every time there is a code change, based on the release process models you define. ...

  • Spinnaker

    Spinnaker

    Created at Netflix, it has been battle-tested in production by hundreds of teams over millions of deployments. It combines a powerful and flexible pipeline management system with integrations to the major cloud providers. ...

  • Google Cloud Build

    Google Cloud Build

    Cloud Build lets you build software quickly across all languages. Get complete control over defining custom workflows for building, testing, and deploying across multiple environments such as VMs, serverless, Kubernetes, or Firebase. ...

  • Deployer

    Deployer

    A deployment tool written in PHP with support for popular frameworks out of the box ...

DeployBot alternatives & related posts

Beanstalk logo

Beanstalk

86
229
51
Private code hosting for teams.
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229
+ 1
51
PROS OF BEANSTALK
  • 14
    Ftp deploy
  • 9
    Deployment
  • 8
    Easy to navigate
  • 4
    Code Editing
  • 4
    HipChat Integration
  • 4
    Integrations
  • 3
    Code review
  • 2
    HTML Preview
  • 1
    Security
  • 1
    Blame Tool
  • 1
    Cohesion
CONS OF BEANSTALK
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Beanstalk posts

    DeployHQ logo

    DeployHQ

    16
    29
    0
    Deploy your websites or apps directly from your repository to servers or the cloud
    16
    29
    + 1
    0
    PROS OF DEPLOYHQ
      Be the first to leave a pro
      CONS OF DEPLOYHQ
        Be the first to leave a con

        related DeployHQ posts

        Jenkins logo

        Jenkins

        43.2K
        35.8K
        2.2K
        An extendable open source continuous integration server
        43.2K
        35.8K
        + 1
        2.2K
        PROS OF JENKINS
        • 522
          Hosted internally
        • 465
          Free open source
        • 315
          Great to build, deploy or launch anything async
        • 243
          Tons of integrations
        • 210
          Rich set of plugins with good documentation
        • 109
          Has support for build pipelines
        • 72
          Open source and tons of integrations
        • 63
          Easy setup
        • 61
          It is open-source
        • 54
          Workflow plugin
        • 11
          Configuration as code
        • 10
          Very powerful tool
        • 9
          Many Plugins
        • 8
          Continuous Integration
        • 8
          Great flexibility
        • 8
          Git and Maven integration is better
        • 6
          Github integration
        • 6
          100% free and open source
        • 6
          Slack Integration (plugin)
        • 5
          Easy customisation
        • 5
          Self-hosted GitLab Integration (plugin)
        • 4
          Docker support
        • 3
          Excellent docker integration
        • 3
          Platform idnependency
        • 3
          Fast builds
        • 3
          Pipeline API
        • 2
          Customizable
        • 2
          Can be run as a Docker container
        • 2
          It`w worked
        • 2
          JOBDSL
        • 2
          Hosted Externally
        • 2
          It's Everywhere
        • 2
          AWS Integration
        • 1
          NodeJS Support
        • 1
          PHP Support
        • 1
          Ruby/Rails Support
        • 1
          Universal controller
        • 1
          Easily extendable with seamless integration
        • 1
          Build PR Branch Only
        CONS OF JENKINS
        • 12
          Workarounds needed for basic requirements
        • 8
          Groovy with cumbersome syntax
        • 6
          Limited abilities with declarative pipelines
        • 6
          Plugins compatibility issues
        • 5
          Lack of support
        • 4
          No YAML syntax
        • 2
          Too tied to plugins versions

        related Jenkins posts

        Tymoteusz Paul
        Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 23 upvotes · 4.6M views

        Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

        It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

        I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

        We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

        If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

        The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

        Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

        See more
        Thierry Schellenbach

        Releasing new versions of our services is done by Travis CI. Travis first runs our test suite. Once it passes, it publishes a new release binary to GitHub.

        Common tasks such as installing dependencies for the Go project, or building a binary are automated using plain old Makefiles. (We know, crazy old school, right?) Our binaries are compressed using UPX.

        Travis has come a long way over the past years. I used to prefer Jenkins in some cases since it was easier to debug broken builds. With the addition of the aptly named “debug build” button, Travis is now the clear winner. It’s easy to use and free for open source, with no need to maintain anything.

        #ContinuousIntegration #CodeCollaborationVersionControl

        See more
        Buddy logo

        Buddy

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        605
        Build, test and deploy on push in seconds.
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        605
        PROS OF BUDDY
        • 56
          Easy setup
        • 53
          Docker
        • 50
          Continuous Integration
        • 49
          Integrations
        • 46
          Beautiful dashboard
        • 45
          Git hosting
        • 43
          Free
        • 41
          Unlimited pipelines
        • 39
          Backup
        • 39
          Monitoring
        • 37
          Great UX
        • 32
          On-Premises
        • 31
          Awesome support
        • 6
          AWS Integrations
        • 5
          Great UI
        • 3
          Bitbucket integration
        • 3
          Slack integration
        • 3
          Simple deployments
        • 3
          Hosted internally (Enterprise)
        • 3
          Continuous deployment
        • 2
          Github integration
        • 2
          UI and YML configuration
        • 2
          Node.js support
        • 2
          Azure integration
        • 2
          Amazing + free
        • 1
          Support for build pipelines
        • 1
          Docker support
        • 1
          Gitlab integration
        • 1
          Android support
        • 1
          Pushover integration
        • 1
          DigitalOcean integration
        • 1
          UpCloud integration
        • 1
          Shopify integration
        • 0
          New Relic integration
        • 0
          Rollbar integration
        • 0
          Sentry integration
        • 0
          Loggly integration
        • 0
          Datadog integration
        • 0
          Bugsnag integration
        • 0
          Honeybadger integration
        • 0
          Telegram integration
        • 0
          HipChat integration
        • 0
          Discord integration
        • 0
          Pushbulet integration
        • 0
          AWS integration
        • 0
          Slack Integration
        • 0
          Google Cloud integration
        • 0
          Heroku integration
        • 0
          Rackspace integration
        • 0
          Kubernetes support
        CONS OF BUDDY
        • 1
          Deleted account after 1 month of not pushing code

        related Buddy posts

        CDG

        I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

        Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

        As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

        To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

        CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

        Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

        See more
        AWS CodePipeline logo

        AWS CodePipeline

        445
        709
        30
        Continuous delivery service for fast and reliable application updates
        445
        709
        + 1
        30
        PROS OF AWS CODEPIPELINE
        • 13
          Simple to set up
        • 8
          Managed service
        • 4
          GitHub integration
        • 3
          Parallel Execution
        • 2
          Automatic deployment
        • 0
          Manual Steps Available
        CONS OF AWS CODEPIPELINE
        • 2
          No project boards
        • 1
          No integration with "Power" 365 tools

        related AWS CodePipeline posts

        Khauth György
        CTO at SalesAutopilot Kft. · | 12 upvotes · 382.9K views

        I'm the CTO of a marketing automation SaaS. Because of the continuously increasing load we moved to the AWSCloud. We are using more and more features of AWS: Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53 and so on.

        Our main Database is MySQL but for the hundreds of GB document data we use MongoDB more and more. We started to use Redis for cache and other time sensitive operations.

        On the front-end we use jQuery UI + Smarty but now we refactor our app to use Vue.js with Vuetify. Because our app is relatively complex we need to use vuex as well.

        On the development side we use GitHub as our main repo, Docker for local and server environment and Jenkins and AWS CodePipeline for Continuous Integration.

        See more
        Oliver Burn

        We recently added new APIs to Jira to associate information about Builds and Deployments to Jira issues.

        The new APIs were developed using a spec-first API approach for speed and sanity. The details of this approach are described in this blog post, and we relied on using Swagger and associated tools like Swagger UI.

        A new service was created for managing the data. It provides a REST API for external use, and an internal API based on GraphQL. The service is built using Kotlin for increased developer productivity and happiness, and the Spring-Boot framework. PostgreSQL was chosen for the persistence layer, as we have non-trivial requirements that cannot be easily implemented on top of a key-value store.

        The front-end has been built using React and querying the back-end service using an internal GraphQL API. We have plans of providing a public GraphQL API in the future.

        New Jira Integrations: Bitbucket CircleCI AWS CodePipeline Octopus Deploy jFrog Azure Pipelines

        See more
        Spinnaker logo

        Spinnaker

        194
        286
        9
        Multi-cloud continuous delivery platform for releasing software changes with high velocity and confidence
        194
        286
        + 1
        9
        PROS OF SPINNAKER
        • 9
          Mature
        CONS OF SPINNAKER
        • 2
          No GitOps
        • 1
          Configuration time
        • 1
          Management overhead
        • 1
          Ease of use

        related Spinnaker posts

        John Kodumal

        LaunchDarkly is almost a five year old company, and our methodology for deploying was state of the art... for 2014. We recently undertook a project to modernize the way we #deploy our software, moving from Ansible-based deploy scripts that executed on our local machines, to using Spinnaker (along with Terraform and Packer) as the basis of our deployment system. We've been using Armory's enterprise Spinnaker offering to make this project a reality.

        See more
        Google Cloud Build logo

        Google Cloud Build

        181
        145
        2
        Continuously build, test, and deploy.
        181
        145
        + 1
        2
        PROS OF GOOGLE CLOUD BUILD
        • 1
          Container based
        • 1
          GCP easy integration
        CONS OF GOOGLE CLOUD BUILD
        • 2
          Vendor lock-in

        related Google Cloud Build posts

        Emanuel Evans
        Senior Architect at Rainforest QA · | 16 upvotes · 700.3K views

        We recently moved our main applications from Heroku to Kubernetes . The 3 main driving factors behind the switch were scalability (database size limits), security (the inability to set up PostgreSQL instances in private networks), and costs (GCP is cheaper for raw computing resources).

        We prefer using managed services, so we are using Google Kubernetes Engine with Google Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL for our PostgreSQL databases and Google Cloud Memorystore for Redis . For our CI/CD pipeline, we are using CircleCI and Google Cloud Build to deploy applications managed with Helm . The new infrastructure is managed with Terraform .

        Read the blog post to go more in depth.

        See more

        I use Google Cloud Build because it's my first foray into the CICD world(loving it so far), and I wanted to work with something GCP native to avoid giving permissions to other SaaS tools like CircleCI and Travis CI.

        I really like it because it's free for the first 120 minutes, and it's one of the few CICD tools that enterprises are open to using since it's contained within GCP.

        One of the unique things is that it has the Kaniko cache, which speeds up builds by creating intermediate layers within the docker image vs. pushing the full thing from the start. Helpful when you're installing just a few additional dependencies.

        Feel free to checkout an example: Cloudbuild Example

        See more
        Deployer logo

        Deployer

        52
        66
        21
        Deployment Tool for PHP
        52
        66
        + 1
        21
        PROS OF DEPLOYER
        • 8
          Simply to use
        • 7
          Easy to customize
        • 6
          Easy setup
        CONS OF DEPLOYER
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Deployer posts

          CDG

          I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

          Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

          As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

          To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

          CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

          Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

          See more