Alternatives to Cockpit logo

Alternatives to Cockpit

Strapi, Webmin, Portainer, Netdata, and Ansible are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Cockpit.
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What is Cockpit and what are its top alternatives?

An API-driven CMS without forcing you to make compromises in how you implement your site. The CMS for developers. Manage content like collections, regions, forms and galleries which you can reuse anywhere on your website.
Cockpit is a tool in the Cloud Content Management System category of a tech stack.
Cockpit is an open source tool with 5.2K GitHub stars and 541 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Cockpit's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Cockpit

  • Strapi

    Strapi

    Strapi is100% JavaScript, extensible, and fully customizable. It enables developers to build projects faster by providing a customizable API out of the box and giving them the freedom to use the their favorite tools. ...

  • Webmin

    Webmin

    It is a web-based interface for system administration for Unix. Using any modern web browser, you can setup user accounts, Apache, DNS, file sharing and much more. It removes the need to manually edit Unix configuration files. ...

  • Portainer

    Portainer

    It is a universal container management tool. It works with Kubernetes, Docker, Docker Swarm and Azure ACI. It allows you to manage containers without needing to know platform-specific code. ...

  • Netdata

    Netdata

    Netdata democratizes monitoring, empowering IT teams to know more about their infrastructure, enabling them to quickly identify and troubleshoot issues, collaborate to solve problems, and make data-driven decisions to move business forward. ...

  • Ansible

    Ansible

    Ansible is an IT automation tool. It can configure systems, deploy software, and orchestrate more advanced IT tasks such as continuous deployments or zero downtime rolling updates. Ansible’s goals are foremost those of simplicity and maximum ease of use. ...

  • Directus

    Directus

    Let's say you're planning on managing content for a website, native app, and widget. Instead of using a CMS that's baked into the website client, it makes more sense to decouple your content entirely and access it through an API or SDK. That's a headless CMS. That's Directus. ...

  • Contentful

    Contentful

    Contentful enables teams to unify content in a single hub, structure it for use in any digital channel, and integrate seamlessly with hundreds of other tools through open APIs and a leading app framework. ...

  • prismic.io

    prismic.io

    Prismic is a Content Management System, a tool for editing online content, also known as a headless CMS, an API CMS, a content platform, a disruptive content-as-a-service digital experience. ...

Cockpit alternatives & related posts

Strapi logo

Strapi

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943
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The leading open-source Headless-CMS
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+ 1
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PROS OF STRAPI
  • 49
    Free
  • 34
    Open source
  • 25
    Rapid development
  • 22
    API-based cms
  • 22
    Self-hostable
  • 17
    Real-time
  • 14
    Headless
  • 14
    Easy setup
  • 11
    Large community
  • 10
    JSON
  • 3
    Internationalization
  • 3
    GraphQL
  • 3
    Social Auth
  • 2
    Media Library
  • 1
    Components
CONS OF STRAPI
  • 7
    Internationalisation
  • 7
    Can be limiting
  • 5
    A bit buggy
  • 3
    DB Migrations not seemless

related Strapi posts

Hi Stackers, We are planning to build a product information portal that also provides useful articles and blogs. Application Frontend is going to be built on Next.js with Authentication and Product Database helped by Firebase. But for the Blog / Article we are debating between WordPress/GraphQL plug-in or Strapi.

Please share your thoughts.

See more
Webmin logo

Webmin

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A web-based system configuration tool
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PROS OF WEBMIN
  • 1
    Review real-time resources (cpu, mem, stg, proc)
  • 1
    DNS Zone Editor
  • 1
    Modify ports and usage
  • 1
    Extensible and flexible
  • 1
    Modify applications
  • 1
    Free
  • 1
    Easy to use
CONS OF WEBMIN
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Webmin posts

    Portainer logo

    Portainer

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    Open source tool for managing containerized applications
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    PROS OF PORTAINER
    • 35
      Simple
    • 25
      Great UI
    • 17
      Friendly
    • 12
      Easy to setup, gives a practical interface for Docker
    • 11
      Fully featured
    • 9
      Because it just works, super simple yet powerful
    • 8
      A must for Docker DevOps
    • 6
      Free and opensource
    • 4
      It's simple, fast and the support is great
    • 4
      API
    • 3
      Template Support
    CONS OF PORTAINER
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Portainer posts

      Charles Coleman
      President/CEO at Rapidfyre · | 2 upvotes · 83K views
      Shared insights
      on
      PortainerPortainerDockerDocker

      I've found Portainer to be a like the 8 tooled jacknife I need for Docker and am loving it. Wasn't hard to get up and going and is well rounded enough to do everything I need. Win win.

      See more
      Wallace Alves
      Cyber Security Analyst · | 1 upvote · 585.8K views

      Docker Docker Compose Portainer ELK Elasticsearch Kibana Logstash nginx

      See more
      Netdata logo

      Netdata

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      Monitor everything in real time – for free
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      PROS OF NETDATA
      • 16
        Free
      • 12
        Easy setup
      • 10
        Graphs are interactive
      • 8
        Well maintained on github
      • 7
        Montiors datasbases
      • 6
        Monitors nginx, redis, logs
      • 3
        Can submit metrics to Time Series databases
      • 2
        Open source
      • 2
        Netdata is also a statsd server
      • 1
        GPLv3
      • 1
        Written in C
      • 0
        Hoa
      • 0
        Easy Alert Setop
      CONS OF NETDATA
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Netdata posts

        Ansible logo

        Ansible

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        Radically simple configuration-management, application deployment, task-execution, and multi-node orchestration engine
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        PROS OF ANSIBLE
        • 276
          Agentless
        • 204
          Great configuration
        • 195
          Simple
        • 173
          Powerful
        • 151
          Easy to learn
        • 66
          Flexible
        • 54
          Doesn't get in the way of getting s--- done
        • 34
          Makes sense
        • 29
          Super efficient and flexible
        • 27
          Powerful
        • 11
          Dynamic Inventory
        • 8
          Backed by Red Hat
        • 7
          Works with AWS
        • 6
          Cloud Oriented
        • 6
          Easy to maintain
        • 4
          Because SSH
        • 4
          Multi language
        • 4
          Easy
        • 4
          Simple
        • 4
          Procedural or declarative, or both
        • 4
          Simple and powerful
        • 3
          Consistency
        • 3
          Vagrant provisioner
        • 2
          Fast as hell
        • 2
          Masterless
        • 2
          Well-documented
        • 2
          Merge hash to get final configuration similar to hiera
        • 2
          Debugging is simple
        • 1
          Work on windows, but difficult to manage
        • 1
          Certified Content
        CONS OF ANSIBLE
        • 5
          Dangerous
        • 5
          Hard to install
        • 3
          Bloated
        • 3
          Backward compatibility
        • 2
          Doesn't Run on Windows
        • 2
          No immutable infrastructure

        related Ansible posts

        Tymoteusz Paul
        Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 23 upvotes · 4.6M views

        Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

        It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

        I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

        We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

        If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

        The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

        Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

        See more
        Sebastian Gębski

        Heroku was a decent choice to start a business, but at some point our platform was too big, too complex & too heterogenic, so Heroku started to be a constraint, not a benefit. First, we've started containerizing our apps with Docker to eliminate "works in my machine" syndrome & uniformize the environment setup. The first orchestration was composed with Docker Compose , but at some point it made sense to move it to Kubernetes. Fortunately, we've made a very good technical decision when starting our work with containers - all the container configuration & provisions HAD (since the beginning) to be done in code (Infrastructure as Code) - we've used Terraform & Ansible for that (correspondingly). This general trend of containerisation was accompanied by another, parallel & equally big project: migrating environments from Heroku to AWS: using Amazon EC2 , Amazon EKS, Amazon S3 & Amazon RDS.

        See more
        Directus logo

        Directus

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        Free and Open-Source Headless CMS
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        PROS OF DIRECTUS
        • 7
          Open Source
        • 5
          Self-hostable
        • 4
          API-based CMS
        • 2
          Version 9 is Javascript Based
        CONS OF DIRECTUS
        • 4
          Php based

        related Directus posts

        Contentful logo

        Contentful

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        The content platform to build digital experiences at scale
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        PROS OF CONTENTFUL
        • 28
          API-based cms
        • 17
          Much better than WordPress
        • 11
          Simple and customizable
        • 4
          Images API
        • 3
          Free for small projects
        • 1
          Extensible dashboard UI
        • 1
          Super simple to integrate
        • 1
          Managed Service
        • 1
          Tag Manager like UI
        CONS OF CONTENTFUL
        • 5
          No spell check
        • 5
          No repeater Field
        • 3
          Slow dashboard
        • 3
          No free plan
        • 2
          Limited content types
        • 2
          Enterprise targeted
        • 2
          Pricey
        • 1
          Not scalable

        related Contentful posts

        Shared insights
        on
        ContentfulContentfulFirebaseFirebase

        Hi. I am gonna build a simple app for a company to ease their work. The company is sending out pdf files to their users' email. The data is a health analysis with a lot of different health values. The app should be an MVP, where users can watch their data instead of opening a pdf file. The company should be able to fill in the data in either Firebase or Contentful database. Is Contentful or Firebase best for this solution? What is your opinion?

        See more
        Nash Nziramasanga
        Software Developer at Billow Software · | 3 upvotes · 35.1K views
        Shared insights
        on
        SanitySanityContentfulContentfulNext.jsNext.js

        Im building a simple portfolio website using Next.js and all the content is static, what's the best between Contentful and Sanity.

        I really like the self-hosting and custom layout with sanity however I don't think time customizing is worth it anymore.

        Any thoughts

        See more
        prismic.io logo

        prismic.io

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        Keep your content in a content repository that you can query via its simple REST API
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        PROS OF PRISMIC.IO
        • 6
          Nice writing room
        • 3
          Prismic.io powers lichess.org/blog
        • 3
          Very Good UX
        • 2
          Works with GraphQL with Gatsby
        • 2
          Nice UI and clean
        • 2
          Friendly Pricing
        • 1
          Releases - Scheduling content to go live
        • 1
          Page "slices" very useful
        • 1
          Slices - Reusable components
        • 1
          SDKs for render frameworks
        • 1
          Integration Field
        CONS OF PRISMIC.IO
        • 2
          No write API yet
        • 1
          No admin UX control (only schema)

        related prismic.io posts