Alternatives to AWS AppSync logo

Alternatives to AWS AppSync

Prisma, Firebase, AWS Mobile Hub, AWS Amplify, and Realm are the most popular alternatives and competitors to AWS AppSync.
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What is AWS AppSync and what are its top alternatives?

AWS AppSync automatically updates the data in web and mobile applications in real time, and updates data for offline users as soon as they reconnect. AppSync makes it easy to build collaborative mobile and web applications that deliver responsive, collaborative user experiences.
AWS AppSync is a tool in the GraphQL as a Service category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to AWS AppSync

  • Prisma
    Prisma

    Prisma is an open-source database toolkit. It replaces traditional ORMs and makes database access easy with an auto-generated query builder for TypeScript & Node.js. ...

  • Firebase
    Firebase

    Firebase is a cloud service designed to power real-time, collaborative applications. Simply add the Firebase library to your application to gain access to a shared data structure; any changes you make to that data are automatically synchronized with the Firebase cloud and with other clients within milliseconds. ...

  • AWS Mobile Hub
    AWS Mobile Hub

    AWS Mobile Hub is the fastest way to build mobile apps powered by AWS. It lets you easily add and configure features for your apps, including user authentication, data storage, backend logic, push notifications, content delivery, and analytics. After you build your app, AWS Mobile Hub gives you easy access to testing on real devices, as well as analytics dashboards to track usage of your app – all from a single, integrated console. ...

  • AWS Amplify
    AWS Amplify

    A JavaScript library for frontend and mobile developers building cloud-enabled applications. The library is a declarative interface across different categories of operations in order to make common tasks easier to add into your application. The default implementation works with Amazon Web Services (AWS) resources but is designed to be open and pluggable for usage with other cloud services that wish to provide an implementation or custom backends. ...

  • Realm
    Realm

    The Realm Mobile Platform is a next-generation data layer for applications. Realm is reactive, concurrent, and lightweight, allowing you to work with live, native objects. ...

  • Firebase Realtime Database
    Firebase Realtime Database

    It is a cloud-hosted NoSQL database that lets you store and sync data between your users in realtime. Data is synced across all clients in realtime, and remains available when your app goes offline. ...

  • Apollo
    Apollo

    Build a universal GraphQL API on top of your existing REST APIs, so you can ship new application features fast without waiting on backend changes. ...

  • Hasura
    Hasura

    An open source GraphQL engine that deploys instant, realtime GraphQL APIs on any Postgres database. ...

AWS AppSync alternatives & related posts

Prisma logo

Prisma

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Modern Database Access for TypeScript & Node.js
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PROS OF PRISMA
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    Type-safe database access
  • 9
    Open Source
  • 8
    Auto-generated query builder
  • 6
    Increases confidence during development
  • 5
    Supports multible database systems
  • 4
    Built specifically for Postgres and TypeScript
  • 4
    Productive application development
  • 1
    Supports multible RDBMSs
  • 0
    Robust migrations system
CONS OF PRISMA
  • 1
    Doesn't support downward/back migrations

related Prisma posts

Divine Bawa
at PayHub Ghana Limited · | 16 upvotes · 319.8K views

I just finished a web app meant for a business that offers training programs for certain professional courses. I chose this stack to test out my skills in graphql and react. I used Node.js , GraphQL , MySQL for the #Backend utilizing Prisma as a database interface for MySQL to provide CRUD APIs and graphql-yoga as a server. For the #frontend I chose React, styled-components for styling, Next.js for routing and SSR and Apollo for data management. I really liked the outcome and I will definitely use this stack in future projects.

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Munkhtegsh Munkhbat
Software Engineer Consultant at LoanSnap · | 9 upvotes · 151.2K views

In my last side project, I built a web posting application that has similar features as Facebook and hosted on Heroku. The user can register an account, create posts, upload images and share with others. I took an advantage of graphql-subscriptions to handle realtime notifications in the comments section. Currently, I'm at the last stage of styling and building layouts.

For the #Backend I used graphql-yoga, Prisma, GraphQL with PostgreSQL database. For the #FrontEnd: React, styled-components with Apollo. The app is hosted on Heroku.

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Firebase logo

Firebase

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The Realtime App Platform
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PROS OF FIREBASE
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    Realtime backend made easy
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    Fast and responsive
  • 239
    Easy setup
  • 212
    Real-time
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    JSON
  • 132
    Free
  • 126
    Backed by google
  • 82
    Angular adaptor
  • 67
    Reliable
  • 35
    Great customer support
  • 30
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Real-time synchronization
  • 21
    Mobile friendly
  • 18
    Rapid prototyping
  • 14
    Great security
  • 12
    Automatic scaling
  • 11
    Freakingly awesome
  • 8
    Chat
  • 8
    Angularfire is an amazing addition!
  • 8
    Super fast development
  • 6
    Ios adaptor
  • 6
    Firebase hosting
  • 6
    Awesome next-gen backend
  • 6
    Built in user auth/oauth
  • 4
    Speed of light
  • 4
    Very easy to use
  • 3
    Brilliant for startups
  • 3
    Great
  • 3
    It's made development super fast
  • 2
    Low battery consumption
  • 2
    Free hosting
  • 2
    Cloud functions
  • 2
    Push notification
  • 2
    JS Offline and Sync suport
  • 2
    Free authentication solution
  • 2
    The concurrent updates create a great experience
  • 2
    I can quickly create static web apps with no backend
  • 2
    Great all-round functionality
  • 1
    Easy Reactjs integration
  • 1
    Easy to use
  • 1
    Free SSL
  • 1
    CDN & cache out of the box
  • 1
    Faster workflow
  • 1
    Google's support
  • 1
    .net
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    Serverless
  • 1
    Good Free Limits
  • 1
    Large
CONS OF FIREBASE
  • 31
    Can become expensive
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    No open source, you depend on external company
  • 15
    Scalability is not infinite
  • 9
    Not Flexible Enough
  • 6
    Cant filter queries
  • 3
    No Relational Data
  • 3
    Very unstable server
  • 2
    No offline sync
  • 2
    Too many errors

related Firebase posts

Stephen Gheysens
Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 611.9K views

Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

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Tassanai Singprom

This is my stack in Application & Data

JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

My Utilities Tools

Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

My Devops Tools

Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

My Business Tools

Slack

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AWS Mobile Hub logo

AWS Mobile Hub

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Build, test, and monitor usage of your mobile apps
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PROS OF AWS MOBILE HUB
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF AWS MOBILE HUB
      Be the first to leave a con

      related AWS Mobile Hub posts

      AWS Amplify logo

      AWS Amplify

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      JavaScript Open Source Library with React, React Native Extensions
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      PROS OF AWS AMPLIFY
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        GraphQL
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        Better with Relations and Security
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        Flexible Auth options
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        Cheaper
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        Continuous deployment
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        Backed by Amazon
      CONS OF AWS AMPLIFY
      • 2
        Free tier is limited
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        Steep Learning Curve

      related AWS Amplify posts

      I am currently working on a long term mobile app project. Current stack: Frontend: Dart/Flutter Backend: Go, AWS Resources (AWS Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, etc.) Since there are only two developers and we have limited time and resources, we are looking for a BAAS like Firebase or AWS Amplify to handle auth and push notifications for now. We are prioritizing developing speed so we can iterate quickly. The only problem is that AWS amplify support for flutter is in developer preview and has limited capabilities (We have tested it out in our app). Firebase is the more mature option. It has great support for flutter and has more than we need for auth, notifications, etc. My question is that, if we choose firebase, we would be stuck with using two different cloud providers. Is this bad, or is this even a problem? I am willing to change anything on the backend architecture wise, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated as I am somewhat unfamiliar with Google Cloud Platform. Thank you.

      See more

      I am now building a React Native app, and I don't know what to choose for my backend between AWS Amplify and Firebase. Which one fits more with react native?

      See more
      Realm logo

      Realm

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      Realm makes it easy to build reactive apps, realtime collaborative features, and offline-first experiences.
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      PROS OF REALM
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        Good
      • 3
        Elegant API
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        Cloud Syncing
      • 2
        React Native Support
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        Strong Adoption Growth
      CONS OF REALM
      • 1
        No offline support for web till now

      related Realm posts

      Firebase Realtime Database logo

      Firebase Realtime Database

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      Store and sync data in real time
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      PROS OF FIREBASE REALTIME DATABASE
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        Very fast
      CONS OF FIREBASE REALTIME DATABASE
      • 1
        Poor query

      related Firebase Realtime Database posts

      We are building a social media app, where users will post images, like their post, and make friends based on their interest. We are currently using Cloud Firestore and Firebase Realtime Database. We are looking for another database like Amazon DynamoDB; how much this decision can be efficient in terms of pricing and overhead?

      See more
      Apollo logo

      Apollo

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      GraphQL server for Express, Connect, Hapi, Koa and more
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      PROS OF APOLLO
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        From the creators of Meteor
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        Great documentation
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        Real time if use subscription
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        Open source
      CONS OF APOLLO
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Apollo posts

        Nick Rockwell
        SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 44 upvotes · 1.9M views

        When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

        So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

        React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

        Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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        Adam Neary

        At Airbnb we use GraphQL Unions for a "Backend-Driven UI." We have built a system where a very dynamic page is constructed based on a query that will return an array of some set of possible “sections.” These sections are responsive and define the UI completely.

        The central file that manages this would be a generated file. Since the list of possible sections is quite large (~50 sections today for Search), it also presumes we have a sane mechanism for lazy-loading components with server rendering, which is a topic for another post. Suffice it to say, we do not need to package all possible sections in a massive bundle to account for everything up front.

        Each section component defines its own query fragment, colocated with the section’s component code. This is the general idea of Backend-Driven UI at Airbnb. It’s used in a number of places, including Search, Trip Planner, Host tools, and various landing pages. We use this as our starting point, and then in the demo show how to (1) make and update to an existing section, and (2) add a new section.

        While building your product, you want to be able to explore your schema, discovering field names and testing out potential queries on live development data. We achieve that today with GraphQL Playground, the work of our friends at #Prisma. The tools come standard with Apollo Server.

        #BackendDrivenUI

        See more
        Hasura logo

        Hasura

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        An open source GraphQL engine that deploys instant, realtime GraphQL APIs on any Postgres database.
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        PROS OF HASURA
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          Fast
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          Easy GraphQL subscriptions
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          Easy setup of relationships and permissions
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          Automatically generates your GraphQL schema
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          Minimal learning curve
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          No back-end code required
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          Works with new and existing databases
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          Instant production ready GraphQL
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          Great UX
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          Simple
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          Low usage of resources
        CONS OF HASURA
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          Cumbersome validations

        related Hasura posts