Redis

Application and Data / Data Stores / In-Memory Databases
Shared insights

Light weight queueing and smart caching for our data collection processes. Redis

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1 upvote1.3K views
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CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt)

We make extensive use of Redis for our caches and use it as a way to save "semi-permanent" stuff like user-submit settings (that get refreshed on each login) or cooldowns that expire very fast. Additionally we also utilize the Pub-Sub capabilities that Redis has to offer.

We decided against using a dedicated Message-Broker/Streaming Platform like RabbitMQ or Kafka, as we already had a packet-based, custom protocol for communication between servers and services, and we only needed some "tiny" Pub-Sub magic to fill in the gaps. An entire additional service just for this oddjob would've been a total overkill.

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1 upvote4.3K views
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Avatar of shosti
Senior Architect at Rainforest QA

We recently moved our main applications from Heroku to Kubernetes . The 3 main driving factors behind the switch were scalability (database size limits), security (the inability to set up PostgreSQL instances in private networks), and costs (GCP is cheaper for raw computing resources).

We prefer using managed services, so we are using Google Kubernetes Engine with Google Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL for our PostgreSQL databases and Google Cloud Memorystore for Redis . For our CI/CD pipeline, we are using CircleCI and Google Cloud Build to deploy applications managed with Helm . The new infrastructure is managed with Terraform .

Read the blog post to go more in depth.

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Why Rainforest QA Moved from Heroku to Google Kubernetes Engine (rainforestqa.com)
13 upvotes1 comment455.7K views
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at

I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis 聽for cache and other time sensitive operations.

We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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19 upvotes700.1K views
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CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt)

We use GraphQL for the communication between our Minecraft-Proxies/Load-Balancers and our global Minecraft-Orchestration-Service JCOverseer.

This connection proved to be especially challenging, as there were so many available options and very specific requirements and we tried our hardest to put as little complexity into this interface as possible.

Initially we considered designing our very own Netty based Packet-Protocol. While the performance of this approach probably would've been noteworthy, we would have had to write a lot of packets as the individual payloads would differ a lot and for the protocol specification a new project would've been needed, so we scrapped that idea.

Our second idea was to use a combination of Redis Key/Value store (in particular the ability to write whole, complex sets as the values of keys) for existing data, Redis Pub-Sub for the synchronization of new/changed/deleted data and a Vert.x based REST API for the mutation requests of the clients. While this would certainly have been possible, we decided against it, as redis offers no real other data types than strings and typing was important to us.

So we finally settled for GraphQL as it would allow us to define dynamic queries and mutations and additionally has subscriptions in store, so we would only need one component instead of three separate. The proxies register as subscribers to the server changes channel and fetch the current data set in advance. If they need to request changes, this is done through a mutation in GraphQL aswell.

The status of the invidiual servers is fetched through Docker healthchecks and a Docker client in the orchestration service, that subscribes to changed HEALTHINESS values in docker. If a service becomes unhealthy it is unregistered and synchronized through GraphQL. The healthcheck is comparable to a ping packet that expects a response in a given time frame.

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5 upvotes12.3K views
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Avatar of zimoony
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH

Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
  • Respectively Git as revision control system
  • SourceTree as Git GUI
  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
  • SonarQube as quality gate
  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
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27 upvotes2 comments1.6M views
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Repost

Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

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16 upvotes2 comments211.7K views
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Avatar of fdjiwani
Software Engineer at IVP
Needs advice
on
Dynatrace
Datadog
and
AppDynamics

Hey there! We are looking at Datadog, Dynatrace, AppDynamics, and New Relic as options for our web application monitoring.

Current Environment: .NET Core Web app hosted on Microsoft IIS

Future Environment: Web app will be hosted on Microsoft Azure

Tech Stacks: IIS, RabbitMQ, Redis, Microsoft SQL Server

Requirement: Infra Monitoring, APM, Real - User Monitoring (User activity monitoring i.e., time spent on a page, most active page, etc.), Service Tracing, Root Cause Analysis, and Centralized Log Management.

Please advise on the above. Thanks!

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5 upvotes317.7K views
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Needs advice
on
Redis
Kafka
and
Django

I'm building a website where users can participate, like and dislike any given challenge.

Problem : If 10k or 1 million users join the given challenge at a time it can cause a race condition in my database MySQL and in also Redis.

What I want : Aggregating joined participated users, likes and dislikes.

Solution : I'm thinking about using Kafka as a Queue message broker then users event one by one saving into Redis, database and aggregate them.

One problem is also here saving and doing aggregate takes time now; how can I show users they have successfully joined the challenge?

One solution is that when a user joins the challenge I send a request to the Kafka queue then update the current user UI and show a success message (not updating the other users' joined messages to current user because I am not using Websockets)

Other App example Take the same example of https://stackshare.io posts. On posts users can like, dislike and comments.

Estimated users : 1 million Stack : Django, Mysql, Redis and Kafka

Questions

  • How I can manage these kinds of things?
  • How do big tech companies handle this?
  • Where am I right or wrong?
  • Are there other tools that can help me in this situation?
  • I am using locks in Redis when total like, dislike and joined users increment or decrement. Should I be doing this? Is it the same for transactions in MySQL?

I need the best approach to handle this situation that can also be scalable.

Thanks in advance for reading my post and giving me suggestions on this. 鈽猴笍

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3 upvotes20.8K views
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Avatar of Oirere-Jr
Software Engineeer at Serftre Inc
Recommends
Kafka

Consider using SQL support on Apache Pinot, which is an online analytic processing datastore which can write complex SQL queries and also join different tables in Pinot with those in other datastores. Pinot enables you to build dashboards for quick analysis and reporting on aggregated data.

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4 upvotes4.7K views
Needs advice
on
Redis
and
RabbitMQ

Hello there, We're developing a team chat application which would consist of direct (one-to-one) conversations and channel (group) conversations. I'm not the developer (of course), but my team suggested to go with Redis.

I've seen tech stacks of BIG team chat applications like Slack and Flock...but they haven't used RabbitMQ and used Redis instead.

A quick question, what's a good choice to go with for RabbitMQ or Redis for a message queue system in our case?

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8 upvotes31.5K views
Replies (2)
Recommends
RabbitMQ

This is of course determined by the needs of your application. It is important how many of your estimated instant users in your application will be. Also, the features of the application will affect the architecture of the application. For example, if the message data would be processed on the server, I would prefer a distributed server solution such as akka actor with the rabbitmq cluster. I would definitely use Redis. Both technologies are incomparable lanes. Redis is a database and its purpose is to process data from a different memory with the memory used by the code running on the server. Rabbit is a messaging queue system. It contributes to the architecture in a different dimension. Performance and stability are keywords.

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8 upvotes1 comment6.5K views
Avatar of aparedes
Lead Senior Software Engineer at InTouch Technology
Recommends
RabbitMQ

Each tool supports different use cases. RabbitMQ is a middleware peace supporting message driven reqs like you are trying to accomplish and Redis, on the other hand, allows to store data if performance, cache is important. If we are taking about a message queue system approach you could use RabbitMQ, Amazon SNS/SQS or Apache Kafka

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3 upvotes6.5K views