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Amazon RDS vs Oracle: What are the differences?

What is Amazon RDS? Set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a familiar MySQL, Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server database engine. This means that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases can be used with Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS automatically patches the database software and backs up your database, storing the backups for a user-defined retention period and enabling point-in-time recovery. You benefit from the flexibility of being able to scale the compute resources or storage capacity associated with your Database Instance (DB Instance) via a single API call.

What is Oracle? An RDBMS that implements object-oriented features such as user-defined types, inheritance, and polymorphism. Oracle Database is an RDBMS. An RDBMS that implements object-oriented features such as user-defined types, inheritance, and polymorphism is called an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS). Oracle Database has extended the relational model to an object-relational model, making it possible to store complex business models in a relational database.

Amazon RDS and Oracle are primarily classified as "SQL Database as a Service" and "Databases" tools respectively.

"Reliable failovers" is the primary reason why developers consider Amazon RDS over the competitors, whereas "Reliable" was stated as the key factor in picking Oracle.

According to the StackShare community, Amazon RDS has a broader approval, being mentioned in 1437 company stacks & 526 developers stacks; compared to Oracle, which is listed in 106 company stacks and 92 developer stacks.

Decisions about Amazon RDS and Oracle
Daniel Moya
Data Engineer at Dimensigon · | 4 upvotes · 124.4K views

We have chosen Tibero over Oracle because we want to offer a PL/SQL-as-a-Service that the users can deploy in any Cloud without concerns from our website at some standard cost. With Oracle Database, developers would have to worry about what they implement and the related costs of each feature but the licensing model from Tibero is just 1 price and we have all features included, so we don't have to worry and developers using our SQLaaS neither. PostgreSQL would be open source. We have chosen Tibero over Oracle because we want to offer a PL/SQL that you can deploy in any Cloud without concerns. PostgreSQL would be the open source option but we need to offer an SQLaaS with encryption and more enterprise features in the background and best value option we have found, it was Tibero Database for PL/SQL-based applications.

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We wanted a JSON datastore that could save the state of our bioinformatics visualizations without destructive normalization. As a leading NoSQL data storage technology, MongoDB has been a perfect fit for our needs. Plus it's open source, and has an enterprise SLA scale-out path, with support of hosted solutions like Atlas. Mongo has been an absolute champ. So much so that SQL and Oracle have begun shipping JSON column types as a new feature for their databases. And when Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) announced support for JSON, we basically had our FHIR datalake technology.

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In the field of bioinformatics, we regularly work with hierarchical and unstructured document data. Unstructured text data from PDFs, image data from radiographs, phylogenetic trees and cladograms, network graphs, streaming ECG data... none of it fits into a traditional SQL database particularly well. As such, we prefer to use document oriented databases.

MongoDB is probably the oldest component in our stack besides Javascript, having been in it for over 5 years. At the time, we were looking for a technology that could simply cache our data visualization state (stored in JSON) in a database as-is without any destructive normalization. MongoDB was the perfect tool; and has been exceeding expectations ever since.

Trivia fact: some of the earliest electronic medical records (EMRs) used a document oriented database called MUMPS as early as the 1960s, prior to the invention of SQL. MUMPS is still in use today in systems like Epic and VistA, and stores upwards of 40% of all medical records at hospitals. So, we saw MongoDB as something as a 21st century version of the MUMPS database.

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Pros of Amazon RDS
Pros of Oracle
  • 163
    Reliable failovers
  • 154
    Automated backups
  • 129
    Backed by amazon
  • 92
    Db snapshots
  • 86
    Multi-availability
  • 29
    Control iops, fast restore to point of time
  • 27
    Security
  • 23
    Elastic
  • 20
    Automatic software patching
  • 20
    Push-button scaling
  • 4
    Replication
  • 3
    Reliable
  • 2
    Isolation
  • 42
    Reliable
  • 29
    Enterprise
  • 15
    High Availability
  • 5
    Hard to maintain
  • 4
    Maintainable
  • 4
    Expensive
  • 3
    Hard to use
  • 3
    High complexity

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Cons of Amazon RDS
Cons of Oracle
    Be the first to leave a con
    • 13
      Expensive

    Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

    What is Amazon RDS?

    Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a familiar MySQL, Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server database engine. This means that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases can be used with Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS automatically patches the database software and backs up your database, storing the backups for a user-defined retention period and enabling point-in-time recovery. You benefit from the flexibility of being able to scale the compute resources or storage capacity associated with your Database Instance (DB Instance) via a single API call.

    What is Oracle?

    Oracle Database is an RDBMS. An RDBMS that implements object-oriented features such as user-defined types, inheritance, and polymorphism is called an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS). Oracle Database has extended the relational model to an object-relational model, making it possible to store complex business models in a relational database.

    Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

    What companies use Amazon RDS?
    What companies use Oracle?
    See which teams inside your own company are using Amazon RDS or Oracle.
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    What tools integrate with Amazon RDS?
    What tools integrate with Oracle?

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    What are some alternatives to Amazon RDS and Oracle?
    Amazon Redshift
    It is optimized for data sets ranging from a few hundred gigabytes to a petabyte or more and costs less than $1,000 per terabyte per year, a tenth the cost of most traditional data warehousing solutions.
    Apache Aurora
    Apache Aurora is a service scheduler that runs on top of Mesos, enabling you to run long-running services that take advantage of Mesos' scalability, fault-tolerance, and resource isolation.
    MySQL
    The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.
    Heroku Postgres
    Heroku Postgres provides a SQL database-as-a-service that lets you focus on building your application instead of messing around with database management.
    Google Cloud SQL
    MySQL databases deployed in the cloud without a fuss. Google Cloud Platform provides you with powerful databases that run fast, don’t run out of space and give your application the redundant, reliable storage it needs.
    See all alternatives
    How developers use Amazon RDS and Oracle
    Pathwright uses
    Amazon RDS

    While we initially started off running our own Postgres cluster, we evaluated RDS and found it to be an excellent fit for us.

    The failovers, manual scaling, replication, Postgres upgrades, and pretty much everything else has been super smooth and reliable.

    We'll probably need something a little more complex in the future, but RDS performs admirably for now.

    AngeloR uses
    Amazon RDS

    We are using RDS for managing PostgreSQL and legacy MSSQL databases.

    Unfortunately while RDS works great for managing the PostgreSQL systems, MSSQL is very much a second class citizen and they don't offer very much capability. Infact, in order to upgrade instance storage for MSSQL we actually have to spin up a new cluster and migrate the data over.

    Wirkn Inc. uses
    Amazon RDS

    Our PostgreSQL servers, where we keep the bulk of Wirkn data, are hosted on the fantastically easy and reliable AWS RDS platform.

    Digital2Go uses
    Amazon RDS

    We use Aurora for our OLTP database, it provides significant speed increases on top of MySQL without the need to manage it

    fadingdust uses
    Amazon RDS

    RDS allows us to replicate the development databases locally as well as making it available to CircleCI.

    Onezino Gabriel uses
    Oracle

    Gerenciamento de banco de dados utilizados por odos os serviços/aplicações criados

    Adrian Harabulă uses
    Oracle

    recommended solution at school, also used to try out alternatives to MySQL

    Satoru Ishikawa uses
    Oracle

    データベース構成設計や実際のデータ操作など。実作業では9i, 10g, 11gを触った。

    Hyunwoo Shim uses
    Oracle

    Oracle을 통해 RDB를 학습하였습니다.

    douglasresende uses
    Oracle

    I'm expert database.