Alternatives to Distelli logo

Alternatives to Distelli

Jenkins, Chef, Octopus Deploy, AWS CodeDeploy, and Laravel Forge are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Distelli.
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What is Distelli and what are its top alternatives?

Build, test, and deploy your code from GitHub and BitBucket (or no repository at all) to any server in the world regardless of provider. Distelli customers iterate and ship faster with complete transparency.
Distelli is a tool in the Deployment as a Service category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Distelli

  • Jenkins
    Jenkins

    In a nutshell Jenkins CI is the leading open-source continuous integration server. Built with Java, it provides over 300 plugins to support building and testing virtually any project. ...

  • Chef
    Chef

    Chef enables you to manage and scale cloud infrastructure with no downtime or interruptions. Freely move applications and configurations from one cloud to another. Chef is integrated with all major cloud providers including Amazon EC2, VMWare, IBM Smartcloud, Rackspace, OpenStack, Windows Azure, HP Cloud, Google Compute Engine, Joyent Cloud and others. ...

  • Octopus Deploy
    Octopus Deploy

    Octopus Deploy helps teams to manage releases, automate deployments, and operate applications with automated runbooks. It's free for small teams. ...

  • AWS CodeDeploy
    AWS CodeDeploy

    AWS CodeDeploy is a service that automates code deployments to Amazon EC2 instances. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications. ...

  • Laravel Forge
    Laravel Forge

    Provision, host, and deploy PHP applications on AWS, DigitalOcean, and Linode. ...

  • ReleaseHub
    ReleaseHub

    It makes it incredibly easy to manage environments so your team can focus on building value for your customers. It can build environments in our cloud or yours, from the simplest (static javascript) to the most complex (microservices with many cloud-native dependencies) applications. It supports production and pre-production environments and every step from code push to environment creation is completely automated. ...

  • ElasticBox
    ElasticBox

    Configure and deploy applications using CM tools like Docker, Chef, and Puppet. Your application is fully mobile across all major cloud environments because it’s decoupled from underlying cloud infrastructure. ...

  • Dockbit
    Dockbit

    Dockbit is the continuous delivery platform that helps teams ship software faster, together and without fear. Connect dozens of services together and kick-off deployments with a single Slack command. ...

Distelli alternatives & related posts

Jenkins logo

Jenkins

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An extendable open source continuous integration server
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PROS OF JENKINS
  • 522
    Hosted internally
  • 466
    Free open source
  • 316
    Great to build, deploy or launch anything async
  • 242
    Tons of integrations
  • 211
    Rich set of plugins with good documentation
  • 111
    Has support for build pipelines
  • 75
    Open source and tons of integrations
  • 67
    Easy setup
  • 63
    It is open-source
  • 54
    Workflow plugin
  • 11
    Configuration as code
  • 10
    Very powerful tool
  • 9
    Continuous Integration
  • 9
    Many Plugins
  • 8
    Git and Maven integration is better
  • 8
    Great flexibility
  • 7
    100% free and open source
  • 6
    Github integration
  • 6
    Slack Integration (plugin)
  • 5
    Easy customisation
  • 5
    Self-hosted GitLab Integration (plugin)
  • 4
    Docker support
  • 4
    Pipeline API
  • 3
    Platform idnependency
  • 3
    Excellent docker integration
  • 3
    Fast builds
  • 3
    Hosted Externally
  • 2
    Customizable
  • 2
    AWS Integration
  • 2
    It's Everywhere
  • 2
    JOBDSL
  • 2
    Can be run as a Docker container
  • 2
    It`w worked
  • 1
    Easily extendable with seamless integration
  • 1
    Build PR Branch Only
  • 1
    NodeJS Support
  • 1
    PHP Support
  • 1
    Ruby/Rails Support
  • 1
    Universal controller
  • 1
    Loose Coupling
CONS OF JENKINS
  • 12
    Workarounds needed for basic requirements
  • 9
    Groovy with cumbersome syntax
  • 7
    Plugins compatibility issues
  • 6
    Lack of support
  • 6
    Limited abilities with declarative pipelines
  • 4
    No YAML syntax
  • 3
    Too tied to plugins versions

related Jenkins posts

Tymoteusz Paul
Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 23 upvotes · 5.6M views

Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

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Thierry Schellenbach

Releasing new versions of our services is done by Travis CI. Travis first runs our test suite. Once it passes, it publishes a new release binary to GitHub.

Common tasks such as installing dependencies for the Go project, or building a binary are automated using plain old Makefiles. (We know, crazy old school, right?) Our binaries are compressed using UPX.

Travis has come a long way over the past years. I used to prefer Jenkins in some cases since it was easier to debug broken builds. With the addition of the aptly named “debug build” button, Travis is now the clear winner. It’s easy to use and free for open source, with no need to maintain anything.

#ContinuousIntegration #CodeCollaborationVersionControl

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Chef logo

Chef

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Build, destroy and rebuild servers on any public or private cloud
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PROS OF CHEF
  • 110
    Dynamic and idempotent server configuration
  • 76
    Reusable components
  • 47
    Integration testing with Vagrant
  • 43
    Repeatable
  • 30
    Mock testing with Chefspec
  • 14
    Ruby
  • 8
    Can package cookbooks to guarantee repeatability
  • 7
    Works with AWS
  • 3
    Has marketplace where you get readymade cookbooks
  • 3
    Matured product with good community support
  • 2
    Less declarative more procedural
  • 2
    Open source configuration mgmt made easy(ish)
CONS OF CHEF
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    related Chef posts

    In late 2013, the Operations Engineering team at PagerDuty was made up of 4 engineers, and was comprised of generalists, each of whom had one or two areas of depth. Although the Operations Team ran its own on-call, each engineering team at PagerDuty also participated on the pager.

    The Operations Engineering Team owned 150+ servers spanning multiple cloud providers, and used Chef to automate their infrastructure across the various cloud providers with a mix of completely custom cookbooks and customized community cookbooks.

    Custom cookbooks were managed by Berkshelf, andach custom cookbook contained its own tests based on ChefSpec 3, coupled with Rspec.

    Jenkins was used to GitHub for new changes and to handle unit testing of those features.

    See more
    Marcel Kornegoor

    Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

    For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

    For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

    Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

    See more
    Octopus Deploy logo

    Octopus Deploy

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    465
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    A single place to release, deploy and operate your software
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    PROS OF OCTOPUS DEPLOY
    • 30
      Powerful
    • 25
      Simplicity
    • 19
      Easy to learn
    • 15
      .Net oriented
    • 14
      Easy to manage releases and rollback
    • 7
      Allows multitenancy
    • 4
      Nice interface
    CONS OF OCTOPUS DEPLOY
    • 4
      Poor UI
    • 2
      Config & variables not versioned (e.g. in git)
    • 2
      Management of Config

    related Octopus Deploy posts

    Oliver Burn

    We recently added new APIs to Jira to associate information about Builds and Deployments to Jira issues.

    The new APIs were developed using a spec-first API approach for speed and sanity. The details of this approach are described in this blog post, and we relied on using Swagger and associated tools like Swagger UI.

    A new service was created for managing the data. It provides a REST API for external use, and an internal API based on GraphQL. The service is built using Kotlin for increased developer productivity and happiness, and the Spring-Boot framework. PostgreSQL was chosen for the persistence layer, as we have non-trivial requirements that cannot be easily implemented on top of a key-value store.

    The front-end has been built using React and querying the back-end service using an internal GraphQL API. We have plans of providing a public GraphQL API in the future.

    New Jira Integrations: Bitbucket CircleCI AWS CodePipeline Octopus Deploy jFrog Azure Pipelines

    See more
    Shared insights
    on
    Octopus DeployOctopus DeployJenkinsJenkins

    What is the difference between Jenkins deployment and Octopus Deploy? Please suggest which is better?

    See more
    AWS CodeDeploy logo

    AWS CodeDeploy

    383
    593
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    Coordinate application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances
    383
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    PROS OF AWS CODEDEPLOY
    • 17
      Automates code deployments
    • 9
      Backed by Amazon
    • 7
      Adds autoscaling lifecycle hooks
    • 5
      Git integration
    CONS OF AWS CODEDEPLOY
      Be the first to leave a con

      related AWS CodeDeploy posts

      Chris McFadden
      VP, Engineering at SparkPost · | 9 upvotes · 148.9K views

      The recent move of our CI/CD tooling to AWS CodeBuild / AWS CodeDeploy (with GitHub ) as well as moving to Amazon EC2 Container Service / AWS Lambda for our deployment architecture for most of our services has helped us significantly reduce our deployment times while improving both feature velocity and overall reliability. In one extreme case, we got one service down from 90 minutes to a very reasonable 15 minutes. Container-based build and deployments have made so many things simpler and easier and the integration between the tools has been helpful. There is still some work to do on our service mesh & API proxy approach to further simplify our environment.

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      Sathish Raju
      Founder/CTO at Kloudio · | 5 upvotes · 75.9K views

      At Kloud.io we use Node.js for our backend Microservices and Angular 2 for the frontend. We also use React for a couple of our internal applications. Writing services in Node.js in TypeScript improved developer productivity and we could capture bugs way before they can occur in the production. The use of Angular 2 in our production environment reduced the time to release any new features. At the same time, we are also exploring React by using it in our internal tools. So far we enjoyed what React has to offer. We are an enterprise SAAS product and also offer an on-premise or hybrid cloud version of #kloudio. We heavily use Docker for shipping our on-premise version. We also use Docker internally for automated testing. Using Docker reduced the install time errors in customer environments. Our cloud version is deployed in #AWS. We use AWS CodePipeline and AWS CodeDeploy for our CI/CD. We also use AWS Lambda for automation jobs.

      See more
      Laravel Forge logo

      Laravel Forge

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      255
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      Painless PHP Servers by Laravel
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      PROS OF LARAVEL FORGE
      • 4
        Simply to use
      CONS OF LARAVEL FORGE
      • 2
        Monthly subscription

      related Laravel Forge posts

      Hello, I'm currently writing an e-commerce website with Laravel and Laravel Nova (as an admin panel). I want to start deploying the app and created a DigitalOcean account. After some searches about the deployment process, I saw that the setup via DigitalOcean (using Droplets) isn't very easy for beginners. Now I'm not sure how to deploy my app. I am in between Laravel Forge and DigitalOcean (?Apps Platform or Droplets?). I've read that Heroku and Laravel Vapor are a bit expensive. That's why I didn't consider them yet. I'd be happy to read your opinions on that topic!

      See more
      Sujith Kattathara Bhaskaran

      Heroku is unable to handle payment issues arising due to Indian Reserve Bank's decision to stop recurring card payments. I am using the following Heroku services:

      1. Web Dyno
      2. Worker Dyno (Scheduler)
      3. Cron To Go (Queue)
      4. ClearDB (MySQL)
      5. Heroku Redis (Queue Driver)

      I have to migrate my Apache/ PHP/ Laravel/ HTML/ CSS/ jQuery/ MySQL application hosted on Heroku to a new provider. My current options visible are:

      1. AWS Fargate
      2. AWS Beanstalk
      3. Quovery
      4. Microsoft Azure
      5. Laravel Vapor
      6. Laravel Forge

      Does anyone have any guidance on which of the above options (or any other option not identified above) is recommended for migrating away from Heroku? and why?

      See more
      ReleaseHub logo

      ReleaseHub

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      On-demand environments for development, staging and production
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      PROS OF RELEASEHUB
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        CONS OF RELEASEHUB
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          related ReleaseHub posts

          ElasticBox logo

          ElasticBox

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          Develop, deploy and manage applications on any cloud
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          PROS OF ELASTICBOX
          • 1
            Greate integration using Jenkins plugin
          CONS OF ELASTICBOX
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            related ElasticBox posts

            Dockbit logo

            Dockbit

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            Turn your software deployments into repeatable workflows.
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            PROS OF DOCKBIT
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              CONS OF DOCKBIT
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                related Dockbit posts