Needs advice
on
SQLite
PostgreSQL
and
MySQL

I need to add a DBMS to my stack, but I don't know which. I'm tempted to learn SQLite since it would be useful to me with its focus on local access without concurrency. However, doing so feels like I would be defeating the purpose of trying to expand my skill set since it seems like most enterprise applications have the opposite requirements.

To be able to apply what I learn to more projects, what should I try to learn? MySQL? PostgreSQL? Something else? Is there a comfortable middle ground between high applicability and ease of use?

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7 upvotes·131.3K views
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Recommends
SQLite

You can easily start with SQlite. Really easy to startup since it doesn't require you to install any additional software since is self-contained. It has interfaces in almost any language and also GUIs. Start learning SQL basics and simpler data models and structures. There are many tutorials, also available in the official website. From there you will easily migrate to another database. MySQL could be next, sonce it's easier to learn at first and has more resources available. PostgreSQL is less widespread, more challenging and has the fewer resorces, but once you have some experience with MySQL is really easy to learn as well. All these technologies are really widespread and used accross the industry so you won't make a wrong decision with any of these.

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8 upvotes·1 comment·71.8K views
Dimelo Waterson
Dimelo Waterson
·
November 10th 2020 at 4:13AM

This was a very reassuring take and I appreciated reading it. One of my biggest concerns (something that Stephen mentioned) is that SQLite might be too simplified to translate into a broader operational experience, but your suggestion of starting somewhere (and somewhere simple) was definitely helpful when deciding how to invest my time.

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Senior DevOps Engineer at Vital Beats·

A question you might want to think about is "What kind of experience do I want to gain, by using a DBMS?". If your aim is to have experience with SQL and any related libraries and frameworks for your language of choice (python, I think?), then it kind of doesn't matter too much which you pick so much. As others have said, SQLite would offer you the ability to very easily get started, and would give you a reasonably standard (if a little basic) SQL dialect to work with.

If your aim is actually to have a bit of "operational" experience, in terms of things like what command line tools might be available as standard for the DBMS, understanding how the DBMS handles multiple databases, when to use multiple schemas vs multiple databases, some basic privilege management etc. Then I would recommend PostgreSQL. SQLite's simplicity actually avoids most of these experiences, which is not helpful to you if that is what you hope to learn. MySQL has a few "quirks" to how it manages things like multiple databases, which may lead you to making less good decisions if you tried to take your experience over to different DBMS, especially in bigger enterprise roles. PostgreSQL is kind of a happy middle ground here, with the ability to start PostgreSQL servers via docker or docker-compose making the actual day-to-day management pretty easy, while still giving you experience of the kinds of considerations I have listed above.

At Vital Beats we make use of PostgreSQL, largely because it offers us a happy balance between good management and backup of data, and good standard command line tools, which is essential for us where we are deploying our solutions within Kubernetes / docker, and so more graphical tools are not always appropriate for us. PostgreSQL is also pretty universally supported in terms of language libraries and frameworks, without having to make compromises on how we want to store and layout our data.

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6 upvotes·1 comment·69.6K views
Dimelo Waterson
Dimelo Waterson
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November 10th 2020 at 4:24AM

I appreciate the perspective on operational use- I couldn't quite phrase it, but that was the direction I was interested in. You hit the nail on the head when addressing SQLite's potentially too-convenient structure, which was the heart of my concern when I requested advice. To another point, I spend a lot of time on the command line in Docker instances when I'm trying to test or compare functionality, so while I didn't expect there to be deployment issues with any flavor, it's good to know that PostgreSQL is well-suited for that. I know little enough about the database field that it didn't occur to me that there were even graphical tools to use, so knowing powerful command line resources are available is a definite plus, since I would be working essentially entirely by CLI. Thanks for your perspective.

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Dimelo Waterson

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